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PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2012 11:40 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Thu Aug 06, 2009 10:30 pm
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Location: Desk
So, my second book review, if I may :)

This book is by Jean Bobet and is another translation from French completed by Adam Berry. The book is called, 'Tomorrow, we ride'.

This book is about the brothers, Louison and Jean Bobet and their shared cycling career. Louison won the Tour de France 3 years in a row in the post-war era. His Brother, a scholar and keen anglophile was also his team-mate for most of Louison's career.

Jean Bobet puts a lot of very well written and insightful words around their experiences and triumphs, he also does this in quite an understated and humourous way. One of the nice things about the book is his play on words, plus his own thoughts and feelings regarding his time riding with his famous brother.

The book is, in my own opinion, very good. Really good.

Jean was invited to the Tenth world University Games in Budapest, in which he won the road race. He plays it down quite a bit but one of his memories is the train journey.

"Our train stopped at the first Hungarian railway station in order to receive the local serenade of a military fanfare and a welcome from the local populace"... "such a warm welcome could not be ingored, and that we ought to show the crowds our appreciation with a popular song, if not with an official anthem. And so it was, at the fourth station, that our hosts, standing to attention, were treated with a rendition of 'O Balls of our fathers'. A good half-dozen of Hugarian stations were made to echo with the glory of our ancestors' testicles, and thus came to experience a particular sub-section of the French intelligentsia".

A bit like the Paul Fournel book, he has very emotive feelings about the bike and his joy and pain with it. His 'La volupté' explanation is, again, important to those who find the bike a bit more than just chugging along trying to lose weight or a means to an end.

Genuinely, a good book. It is romantic, saddening and great all rolled into one. Worth a read.

Incidentally, its one of the few books I handed to my SO to read, and yeah, she really got on with it.


ISBN: 978-1-874739-51-7


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2012 12:42 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2010 10:08 am
Posts: 847
Location: French Alps/Annecy
Richards Mountain Bike Book by Nick Crane & Charles Kelly. All about mountain bikes, maintainance and the birth of mtb. Great book.
Wouldn't mind reading The Bicycle Diaries by David Byrne.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2012 10:06 am 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader

Joined: Thu Aug 06, 2009 10:30 pm
Posts: 1255
Location: Desk
New book on Cinelli available soon.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0847 ... d_i=468294

:cry: I think thats now the next 2-3 months of books already planned.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2012 12:04 pm 
The Guv'nor
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Joined: Sun Jul 03, 2005 11:19 pm
Posts: 23176
Location: Retrobike HQ
Nice thread idea. Read quite a few cycling books (or I will once I finish the 50 shades series). Few I've read fairly recently and enjoyed.

Racing Through the Dark - David Millar.

Fairly mixed feeling on Millar based on his past along with interview 'persona' but think he really comes across well in the book which is a good read too > http://www.amazon.co.uk/Racing-Through- ... 296&sr=8-1


Born to Ride - Stephen Roche.

Good in parts, especially dealing with his golden season. Also some good inisghts into the mind of the man. Seems to gloss over his early career a little. Final segment also a little too long imho. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Born-Ride-Autob ... 441&sr=8-1


Slaying the Badger - Richard Moore

Really enjoyed Moore's previous books and this is no exception. A great story well written. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Slaying-Badger- ... 539&sr=8-2


Bike Snob

Read the blog on and off. So far enjoying this more than I expected > http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bike-Snob-Syste ... 598&sr=8-1


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2012 12:08 pm 
The Guv'nor
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Location: Retrobike HQ
It's All About the Bike - Rob Penn

He owns a retrobike t so it's always going to be a good review ;) Interesting concept and good read, worth checking the tv show too > http://www.amazon.co.uk/Its-All-About-B ... 0193881_49


We Were Young and Carefree - Fignon / Fotherington

Gave me a new appreciation of Fignon, good story which is well written and translated > http://www.amazon.co.uk/We-Were-Young-C ... 0193881_55


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2012 3:35 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader

Joined: Thu Aug 06, 2009 10:30 pm
Posts: 1255
Location: Desk
As per a previous post I bought 'The Obree Way' by Graeme Obree.

There are paper-back editions of the book (http://www.obree.com/store.php) which are the same sort of size and format as Privateer, cost is around £30.00 plus post. It is also available in iTunes and Amazon for about £6.00 and can be viewed with a free download Kindle viewer.

So, 'The Obree Way'. In short, for £6.00 (or £4.00 as it cost on the early-bird launch) I was to say the least, very happy with the book. It covers a great deal about bike training in a manner that is easy to read and understand. It covers physical prep, mental prep, measuring your efforts, nutrition, breathing, pedaling. It does the lot and it doesn't have a printed, rigid training regime in there for you to follow.

The book is more directed at cycle racers or perhaps the sort of people who like to look at verifiable numbers to determine that they are improving their fitness or speed, and not just checking out their latest Strava KOM's (moi? shurely shome mishtake). Its also good because it asks you to perform unusual and cruel surgery on your Turbo Trainer (but bad because it then asks you to use said Turbo trainer). It is also one of the more enthusiastic books I have read.

Finally, the main thing about the book is, its accessible. Obree is famous for making his name on a bike constructed out of old spares, making him a World Champion.

The book therefore does not ask you to go and buy an SRM or expect you to join a Gym, buy lots of supplements or do anything more than own a bike, eat heathily, learn to breathe, pedal and, well, yeah, there is the Turbo Trainer bit... But I can forgive him that :)

Best £4 quid I spent in a long time.*

*OK, I bought the paper based one too




Amazon link: http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Obree-Way-e ... 091&sr=8-1


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 9:17 pm 
retrobike rider
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Joined: Fri Apr 23, 2010 9:29 pm
Posts: 625
Location: He doesn't live in "The You-Kay"; he lives in GREAT BRITAIN!
http://www.amazon.com/Campagnolo-75-Yea ... campagnolo
Campagnolo Seventy Five Years of Cycling Passion by Paulo Facchinetti, coffee table books can be a bit naff but by golly this is gorgeous, I wanted to lick every page especially the one with the photo of the full Euclid groupset on it. A book for all the twisted gadget monsters out there.

http://www.amazon.com/Mountain-Racing-G ... sr=1-2-ent
Mountain Bike Racing by Tim Gould and Simon Burney. I must have read this zillions of times and it gets better with age, especially their odd predictions about the future- always a dangerous business- such as the one about how one day all shifters will be like Campagnolo Bullets... Cleverly it doesn't try to be all things to all people, so for the bit about bike set up it explains what works for them and why they chose that. A nice snapshot of the past, written when they were star rider and manager of Team Pugeot.

The only book on "Cycling" I've not really been impressed by was http://www.amazon.com/Stumpjumper-25-Ye ... tumpjumper Stumpjumper 25 years of mountain biking by Mark Riedy, which felt a bit like vanity publishing by Specialized and didn't really get to the important points, like how the stumpy got to be the VW Golf of the mountain bike world.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2012 9:41 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2010 10:11 am
Posts: 1227
Location: Birmingham
Wide eyed and legless: The ANC Squad in the 87' Tour
LA Confidentiale: Never translated from French, but why we're getting excited about Lance now. It was in here all these years even with my rusty French...
Currently reading a biography about a local framebuilder (Orbit & Sirius) and road racer in the 50's 'Frank Clements'.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2012 8:13 pm 
retrobike rider
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Location: Nth Somerset, UK
Just finished 'How I won the yellow jumper' by Ned Boulting.

It is an excellent read as it's both funny and a fascinating look behind the scenes of the tour. There are some very interesting views on Cav, Wiggo, Armstrong, doping and Team Sky (amongst other things).

I got my copy from the bay for £6.50. Money well spent.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2012 8:46 pm 
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Location: On my sofa
Although I'm not the knit-your-own-yoghurt kind of person I'm fond of books about cycle touring;

1. Anne Mustoe - A Bike Ride 12,000 miles around the globe

2. Josie Dew - Slow Coast Home

3. Alaistair Humphries - Thunder and sunshine

4. Christopher Smith - Why don't you fly?

And cycling 'individuals'

1. Richard Moore - In search of Robert Millar

2. Matt Rendell - The Death of Marco Pantani


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