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PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2019 7:27 am 
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Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2014 1:13 pm
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Location: London
Hi guys,

I've finally gave up and admitted that my 57cm Peugeot is too big for me. I really like it because it's my first road bike (I bought it almost exactly a year ago) and it is from 1985, same year as I was born, but it's time for me to move on.

I'm toying with the idea of assembling a bike myself. Maybe carrying over some parts, like the wheels which I proudly built myself.
Do you have any advice on what frame to start with?
The bike would be a commuter (20 to 30 miles a day), all seasons, very little touring and limited to short trips.
I would not be against some clearance for wider tires, just in case I get around building a new set of wheels and fit some grippier rubber to go have fun on unpaved paths. But this is a plus, definitely not a requirement.

I'm told that basically anything is better than Carbolite 103 frames, so I'm lucky on that sense, because everything is going to feel like an improvement.
As a matter of fact I have a HLE frame (Peugeot) at home, which I understand is marginally better than the 103, but I haven't properly ridden it yet, so I can't judge.

If I was to buy a new bike, I'd go for a Genesis Equilibrium or Condor Fratello, but my budget for a vintage bike will be lower, if anything because I anticipate some trial and error in the building process, so I need to leave some room for the inevitable mistakes and/or for a recoating job.
I also eyed a Wilier Tristina, which is kind of nice, but I don't like some of the components and I don't know anything about this frame.
So, say, £300 budget for a frameset, with some leeway if something really nice was to come along.

Thanks for any input :)


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2019 2:22 pm 
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Vitus 979 is pretty winter-proof compared to a steel frame. The bigger frames are a bit flexy but a 55cm would be fine if you're not an all-out sprinter. 28mm tyres fit fine.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2019 3:09 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2014 1:13 pm
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Wow, that's a beautiful frame.
You mean compared to a non-stainless steel frame?


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2019 9:35 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2011 8:41 pm
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Location: Cumbria
I know it goes against the grain but how about buying something new, don't have to worry about rust, stripped threads etc.

London Road is 200 quid...


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2019 9:44 pm 
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Location: Barry
Look out for something local, I see loads on LFGSS


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 18, 2019 7:43 am 
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Midlife wrote:
I know it goes against the grain but how about buying something new, don't have to worry about rust, stripped threads etc.

London Road is 200 quid...



How dare you coming up with such ludicrous idea?!?!

...

actually....


You have a point :D
In a way I'm struggling a bit with the idea, mainly because I tend not to like the aesthetics of modern bikes, but especially for daily, hassle-free use, it would make a lot of sense.
I've been looking at some bikes, this is not bad: https://www.steel-vintage.com/wilier-tr ... ike-detail

In principle I'd like to get something built around a good frame. Then the rest can be upgraded with time.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 18, 2019 10:09 am 
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Quote:
mainly because I tend not to like the aesthetics of modern bikes


It might be helpful to undestand what it is about them that you don't like? Both the Condor and Genesis you mention look 'modern' to me, in as much as they both have a sloping top tube with some seat tube sticking up beyond it, and an 'ahead'set?

You could study some of the copious bike-sizing info online to know what size frame you need? That is fundamental. Don't buy a frame that is not your size (or weight) if you are intending to ride it.

If you like the idea of an '80s steel frame (with an horizontal top tube) look out for something made from Reynolds, Columbus, or Vitus in your size (and weight) and make sure it is in good alignment with good threads and free of corrosion.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 18, 2019 10:24 am 
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Location: London
All very valid points.

I will try to elaborate: It's not so much the sloping tube as the tubing size that I tend not to like about modern bikes. I think the skinny tubes of the 80s are much more pleasing to the eyes. But I understand that up to a certain point pleasure of riding trumps aesthetics, so something like the Condor Acciaio would be acceptable.
I definitely don't like disc brakes, and in general modern components (from threadless headset to huge cassettes with 9 and more cogs) are less elegant than those found on older bikes.
But I hear myself saying that, I admit that sounds a bit fussy...


This is very nice, I think: https://www.purecycles.com/products/pro ... 4403799113


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 18, 2019 5:02 pm 
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You don't have to worry about sounding 'fussy' where I'm concerned.. as I've said before, I have studiously ignored every bicycle 'innovation' since the six-speed freewheel :)


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 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2019 7:43 am 
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Ugo51 wrote:
Wow, that's a beautiful frame.
You mean compared to a non-stainless steel frame?


Basically yes. Conventional steel frames really suffer from salt and wet roads. A couple of winters will kill a nice frame if you’re not careful! You don’t want anything too thin because a just small amount of corrosion in the wrong place will weaken it. Something like normal grade Reynolds 531 is pretty resilient though, the frame will be lighter and more lively than Carbolite too.


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