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 Post subject: Re: Retrobike Touring.
PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 11:08 am 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 10124
Location: New Forest, UK
Quite. If you have gears lower than you can possibly imagine you will still use them!


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 11:19 am 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 10:55 am
Posts: 3427
Location: Dorset
Thanks for the info :D

I'll be tackling flat-ish routes, sadly as a man with more hernia repairs than thumbs my days of powering up hills are over :(

I'll start with the 7x3 set up with a 11-28 cassette and work from there. I have those parts in the spares box so makes sense.

I was planning on starting with a LX groupset, ditching the cantilevers for some v brakes, probably some Dia-compe levers with XT thumbies.


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 Post subject: Re: Retrobike Touring.
PostPosted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 11:23 am 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:42 am
Posts: 3589
hamster wrote:
Gearing depends on terrain and how much stuff you are taking.
Very much this. I've done road tours that require 1:1 gearing or lower (fairly laden in the mountains, 3-4 hours of climbing at walking pace. Then 15 minutes at 60+kph with the smell of burning rubber.). I've also done road tours where something like a 50/34 and 12/28 was more than adequate. (both the Netherlands and Sweden, lightweight/credit card touring, averaging 26-28kph for the day, usually knocked out 120+km by the time you stop for a late lunch, and a few beers....)


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 16, 2020 1:36 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 10:55 am
Posts: 3427
Location: Dorset
A few questions for those that have used stoves such as the Trangia liquid fuel stoves.

How long does the fuel last ?

Can it be stored in something like a Sigg bottle ?

Does the fuel make the food smell ?

Does the simmer setting work well ?


Swinging between a folding stove with pipe and canister or a Trangia liquid fuel one.

There's too much choice :D


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 16, 2020 2:27 pm 
GOLD | PoTM | Rider | rBOTM
GOLD | PoTM | Rider | rBOTM
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Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2013 6:26 pm
Posts: 22146
Location: Northest North Yorkshire. whippet real good...
I have a vango canister operated ground level one going spare as I went titanium last year.


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 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 16, 2020 2:57 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 10124
Location: New Forest, UK
A few questions for those that have used stoves such as the Trangia liquid fuel stoves.

How long does the fuel last?

Meths: a large 0.5l Sigg will do 3-4 days, depending on how much long cooking like pasta you do. Using white gasoline in a pressurised liquid stove (e.g. MSR Whisperlite / Coleman) it's more than a week.
Can it be stored in something like a Sigg bottle ?
It's perfect for the job. They make a special fuel version with a different seal. MSR do them too.
Does the fuel make the food smell ?
No. Meths burns cleanly.
If you run a pressurised liquid stove on petrol it can taint cookware with fingertip transmission.
Does the simmer setting work well ?
On the Trangia - badly. Gas or pressurised liquid fuel are far better. Small ultra light gas burners are not great either.

If you fancy a demo I've got gas, meths and white gasoline stoves. They each have their advantages.
For a quick weekend with hot drinks, a bowl of noodles and a boiled egg for breakfast, a gas jetboil is unbeatable. But the little cyclinders aren't cheap and you are limited in what you can cook successfully.
Gas: easy to use, generally simmer OK, good heat. Needs a windshield to work well, cylinders bulky. Performance can fade badly in the cold.
Trangia is most reliable, brilliant windshield system, but slow and hard to control heat.
White gasoline: massive heat output, fast, generally simmers OK, most compact fuel source. But you can burn yourself badly if careless.

I generally go for a white gasoline stove for longer trips where I'm actually going to cook. I use Aspen4T as fuel (a super-clean organic-based petrol substitute) rather than Coleman fuel.

A Trangia is a great starting point - you can use the burner on its own as a lightweight stove, the pots are superb (I use them with the other stoves).
Avoid titanium cookware, it's a poor conductor of heat and suffers from hotspots worse than aluminium. It's for bragging rights only (I've not seen a carbon fibre coffee mug yet :facepalm: )


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 16, 2020 3:10 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 10:55 am
Posts: 3427
Location: Dorset
Wow !!!

Thanks for that, 8)


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 Post subject: Re: Retrobike Touring.
PostPosted: Thu Jul 16, 2020 9:32 pm 
Dirt Disciple
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Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 12:34 pm
Posts: 37
I've just read this whole thread through, love the write ups - and it's really got my appetite up for some overnighting on the south coast or rural Kent. Never done wild camping before so need to get a few items... any recommendations for a light tent and air mattress? I am on quite a strict budget.

Also discovered that nearly 3 years off the bike has put me back a bit in the old fitness department so will need to build up to any sort of distance!


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 Post subject: Re: Retrobike Touring.
PostPosted: Fri Jul 17, 2020 8:43 am 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 10124
Location: New Forest, UK
A lot of people will tell you to go with a tarp plus bivvy bag!

Wild Country Zephyros 2 or Jack Wolfskin Gossamer would be my choice for lightweight durable tents. A lot depends on how tall you are. I've got both - bought the Gossamer 1 for solo touring, then the Zephyros 2 for out with my second son.
To be honest the Zephyros 2 is OK with adult + child, but a bit of a squeeze for two adults. The Gossamer 1 is tough and just on the tent side of the dividing line between a hooped bivvy and a tent.

For something suitable for anything that the weather can throw at you, but a bit more costly, consider the Terra Nova Voyager. I'm on my second one, having replaced the first after using it solidly for 20 years.

Like bikes, there is no single right answer. If you are over 6' then try to crawl inside before you buy.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 17, 2020 10:58 am 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2011 10:55 am
Posts: 3427
Location: Dorset
I have nearly all my kit sourced, but one thing I am still unsure of is sleeping mats.

As a wonky middle aged man I value a good night's sleep. I have seen lots on websites but want peoples actual experience of them.

Comfort crucial, weight not an issue and if possible modestly priced.


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