Neighbours child has forks on backwards - do I say something

Ian Raleigh

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A few Xmass's back I saw two kids on the street, both on brand new bikes - both wearing helmets - Both wearing the helmets on the 'backs' of their heads and the helmets the wrong way around, I spoke to one of them about it, who then said ''our dad has put our helmets on''

I knew the neighbour so popped around to tell him, after my advice I was met with abuse, telling me I know f*ck all about bikes' .... I told his missus and she stuck up for him! We've never spoken since! The kids for months after still rode with their helmets back to front and on the back of their heads.
 

CassidyAce

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Do these people not see other bikes and notice that the forks look somewhat different? Or that helmets are directional and look, er, 'unusual', the wrong way around?

Anyway, to the OP, it scarcely seems to matter if the neighbours never speak to you again, because they don't speak much anyway. The kid's safety is more of a concern and, admittedly, it's tricky if the parents/grandparents might dig their heels in if the mistake is pointed out. Perhaps consider telling them that the child is more likely to go over the bars with the fork that way around. :?:
 

k-rod

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The lack of foresight, clarity, intelligence, and common sense among the masses never ceases to amaze me ...
 

oaklec

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Do nothing.

Hopefully the kid will grow quickly out of that bike and into something assembled correctly.

Or....... sneak into their garage under the cover of darkness, dressed like a super ninja, armed with a ruck sack of park tools, correct the offending forks and slip away like Santa on a promise
 

MartinYorkshire

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CassidyAce":1v0rc6ye said:
Do these people not see other bikes and notice that the forks look somewhat different? Or that helmets are directional and look, er, 'unusual', the wrong way around?

Anyway, to the OP, it scarcely seems to matter if the neighbours never speak to you again, because they don't speak much anyway. The kid's safety is more of a concern and, admittedly, it's tricky if the parents/grandparents might dig their heels in if the mistake is pointed out. Perhaps consider telling them that the child is more likely to go over the bars with the fork that way around. :?:

I always thought the risk with having forks backwards was that the dropouts were wrongly oriented, meaning if the axle was loose or QR poorly fastenened, the wheel could free itself of the dropout under certain conditions, or is that what you mean as in, wheel gone, forks hit ground, ouch?
 

dyna-ti

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Saw the exact same thing today. Was at the supermarket and some teen(or early 20's pulled in an a giant escape disc. Forks on the wrong way around.
I let him know but was met with a shrug of the shoulders. Fair enough though sod knows how he manages to turn if his feet at level.
I suspect he needs the internet to tell him what to do :LOL: won't take advice from the guy on the £3K custom mtb :roll:

Personally, given theyre the neighbours I'd say something and point them in the direction of the nearest LBS, I'd also mention what happens if the forks come loose from the wheel and he plants face first into the tarmac. No parent wants to hear their their child's become horrifically injured, smashed jaw etc etc when they knew there was an issue.
I'd agree and decline fixing it, claim you get your work done as an lbs but stress the risks were too great for you not to say something. Could mention that theres probably you tube vids showing the danger.
Heres one, everyone get ready to wince :LOL:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CuFejyv ... nMcFarland
 

MartinYorkshire

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Ian Raleigh":2ckqfcem said:
A few Xmass's back I saw two kids on the street, both on brand new bikes - both wearing helmets - Both wearing the helmets on the 'backs' of their heads and the helmets the wrong way around, I spoke to one of them about it, who then said ''our dad has put our helmets on''

I knew the neighbour so popped around to tell him, after my advice I was met with abuse, telling me I know f*ck all about bikes' .... I told his missus and she stuck up for him! We've never spoken since! The kids for months after still rode with their helmets back to front and on the back of their heads.

Sounds about right.
 

MartinYorkshire

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dyna-ti":3v8jxfag said:
Saw the exact same thing today. Was at the supermarket and some teen(or early 20's pulled in an a giant escape disc. Forks on the wrong way around.
I let him know but was met with a shrug of the shoulders. Fair enough though sod knows how he manages to turn if his feet at level.
I suspect he needs the internet to tell him what to do :LOL: won't take advice from the guy on the £3K custom mtb :roll:

I am not a fan of the practice of banning stuff, but I have to say, I think the practice of selling BSO's in a box from new has to stop. As usual, it will take a fatality for people to realise the danger. It's a mode of transport and of course we don't want it stupidly regulated, but it IS a mode of transport capable of what, 40mph at a push, with a kid on it?

Teach a kid to shoot a rifle safely and everyone loses their minds. Stick a kid on a poorly assembled BSO and send them down a hill, it's somehow all fine!
 

MartinYorkshire

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CassidyAce":4wo25r4b said:
Do these people not see other bikes and notice that the forks look somewhat different? Or that helmets are directional and look, er, 'unusual', the wrong way around?

Anyway, to the OP, it scarcely seems to matter if the neighbours never speak to you again, because they don't speak much anyway. The kid's safety is more of a concern and, admittedly, it's tricky if the parents/grandparents might dig their heels in if the mistake is pointed out. Perhaps consider telling them that the child is more likely to go over the bars with the fork that way around. :?:

He's a good kid. He is polite, talkative and courteous. He's made a specific effort to make my (younger) son included in an older group. Any parent would know how important and appreciated that is.

I'll work it out, I just wanted to mash it all through first, with fellow forum members who'd likely experienced similar situations before.

The lad in question has been more into his scooter lately, allowing me some breathing space.

All of it sounds ridiculous, even to me, but then again I never expected to see safety labels on laundry tablets that say "do not eat", either.
 
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