Help with understanding bike sizing

Ugo51

Retro Guru
Hi guys,

I've riding my Peugeot for a couple of years, but never really found it comfortable. I don't quite understand why it is not comfortable though, and although ultimately it's the feeling that counts, I would like to at least attempt to understand where the problem lies. I'm quite attached to this bike as it is my first road bike, and I would like to keep it, and keep on using it.

About a year ago I had some shots taken to see how I fit on it, and I must say, by looking at the picture it doesn't look too bad. Aside from the hunched back, do you spot anything "wrong"?


I have somewhat unusual body measurements, with very short femurs and short arms compared to my torso legth. The bike is a size 56, and I have the seat fully slammed forward.

Thanks!



 

hamster

Retro Wizard
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pigman

Senior Retro Guru
Re:

unfortunately, we are all different - not just in body part measurements, but in preference too.

A lot of my buddies have saddles forwards and like to sit "over" the pedals. I for some reason cannot get comfy doing this and feel perched on a bike, rather than sat on it. So, I like a slack seat angle and a layback seatpost to feel i'm "in the saddle".

Having a back condition also means I ride a long, slammed stem, as stretching my back is relaxing. Sitting more vertically means my back acts as a vertical shock absorber and goes into spasm. Im sure if you looked at me, you'd think I need a shorter stem.

I like a long top tube, as the bike feels to corner and descend better.

There is no correct answer, its a case of years of experience trialling and erroring.

A proper scientific bike fit might help though, never had one
 

Ugo51

Retro Guru
hamster":c878y3rq said:
There is a lot of good info on the Cycling UK forum, for example these:
https://forum.cyclinguk.org/viewtopic.p ... n#p1221164
https://forum.cyclinguk.org/viewtopic.p ... 5&start=30

I agree, you don't look to be in a very odd position. What is uncomfortable?
One of the good things about the comments there is the idea of balancing your body - you should find that you are in balance when pedalling and you won't have too much weight on your wrists.

Thanks. The links are indeed useful, if anything to realize how difficult is to offer any kind of advice via a forum.
The bike feels very tiring. There is a bit too much load on my wrists for the ride to be comfortable, but other than that, which is solvable somewhat easily, I suspect it's a matter of fine tuning.
 

Ugo51

Retro Guru
Re: Re:

pigman":1brz934s said:
unfortunately, we are all different - not just in body part measurements, but in preference too.

A lot of my buddies have saddles forwards and like to sit "over" the pedals. I for some reason cannot get comfy doing this and feel perched on a bike, rather than sat on it. So, I like a slack seat angle and a layback seatpost to feel i'm "in the saddle".

Having a back condition also means I ride a long, slammed stem, as stretching my back is relaxing. Sitting more vertically means my back acts as a vertical shock absorber and goes into spasm. Im sure if you looked at me, you'd think I need a shorter stem.

I like a long top tube, as the bike feels to corner and descend better.

There is no correct answer, its a case of years of experience trialling and erroring.

A proper scientific bike fit might help though, never had one


hehe, looks like we like opposite riding positions!

I have to say that I don't know my preferences that well, yet. I've only ridden that Peugeot and only recently (last October) got a modern road bike, which feels so different I cannot even compare the two!

Yesterday I tried fitting a flat bar on the Peugeot. Looks aside (I kinda like, actually), it's definitely comfortable as far as loads on the wrists goes, but the steering is unbearably twitchy, as the stem is very short.
 

hamster

Retro Wizard
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It's counter-intuitive but you could try moving the saddle backward say 2cm.
What it will do is place your trunk over the back of the bike and balance your core weight a bit more. In turn this can take weight off your wrists.
 
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