What is light for a retro MTB ??

Matttymm

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Hello

I’ve been working on my first proper bike project:
1995 Marin Team Titanium.

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=424108

I’ve been trying to lighten the ride, Aerothan tubes made a big difference, changing to an Ergon saddle (needing some comfort). Titanium crank bolts - bit of luxury.

It’s a smidgen over 24lbs, and was wondering whether that’s light in comparison. I know that taking the toe clips off would get me under 24lbs but I actually like them.

Know there are some sweet rides out there so please let me know where it’s at !?

Thanks

Matt
 

My_Teenage_Self

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Re: What is light for a retro MTB

How about 20lb with maguras, front suspension and full 24 speeds? All period correct, of course... :twisted: :twisted:

But, 24lb is a very good weight for a ride-able retro. Looking at your build, without starting from scratch and honing the weight from every component, I don't think you'll save any significant weight anywhere.
 

Matttymm

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Crikey !! I can’t imagine where I could lose 4lbs - is it titanium ?

I assume carbon doesn’t really count on a retrobike !

Thanks for the feedback, I don’t know either where to go but am really wondering how it compares
 

My_Teenage_Self

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It's a 1993 Trek 9800 in carbon and every component is from 93-95 (including the air-B innertubes!!). There were plenty of carbon frames and components around in the 90s! link is in my signature.

But, every component was chosen for weight and as I said, to lose any significant weight from yours would need (almost) a total rebuild...

The key bits that jump out on your bike would ruin the build completey;

Quill stem & headset = heavy. You could save 1/2 lb changing to aheadset, and you have heavy stem, bars and seatpost. Your forks aren't the lightest by a long way. Different wheels could easily shave another 1/2 lb. Cranks - XTR are lovely, but you can save a lot of weight there. again, a Ti BB knocks weight off. LIghter brakes, shifters and levers are all easily available.

Buuuuuut... it looks great the way it is!! My lotus has a similar build to yours, and also comes in about 24lb. I reckon that's the sweet spot for retro unless you're very light (I'm not a big guy) or don't intend to ride it :)
 

Matttymm

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Re:

I’m not a retro bike expert with any stretch of the imagination. I remember carbon coming in later in the 90s, a lot of the bikes I see on here seem to make mine look young.

Agreed I’m not looking to change anything on mine. I toyed with finding the Titec titanium bar as I think it was on the Ultimate Titanium but that moves away from the period accuracy and I lose the Marin logos.

Your comment on forks is an interesting one. I always thought the Manitous were one of the lightest that year. I thought the early Rockshox were much heavier.

So 20lbs is the benchmark so far!!

If I lose any weight anywhere it will be me, not the bike.
 

FluffyChicken

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For an early 90's large framed stell bike, using period stuff, with front sus, then 23lb is nice and light, 24lb is light, 25lb is normal light and anything lower is either a lie, dodgy scales or a really went for it build or using a light frame and small sized (probably skinny silly unusable tyres too ;-) )

Been there, done that and aim for
Mid 90's if you can get to 23lb with comfort and usability with front sus, you're doing well.
Or get a thin Ti/Carbon/Alu frame.

You need to weight everything and be pedantic about it, check your balances with known good weights to check they are at least reasonable.
I checked mine against calibrated masses in the 10g, 100g, 300g range and the heavier ''digital hanging scale' with 1kg to 15kg masses. But then I had access to them.
 

Matttymm

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Re:

Thanks that’s super useful.

I told myself that if I get to the stage of weighing bolts then I probably need another hobby. I weight my toe clip straps and had a word with myself.

Seems it’s all about where you want to compensate to get any lighter. I could go for an uncomfortable titanium saddle, lose the toe clips, take the bottle cage off and be at 23lbs. None of those I’m going to be doing.

24lbs seems like a good effort all round them and I’m totally stoked with that.

What would be fork options - although my Manitous are sweet and are correct for the Marins. !?
 

legrandefromage

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My Zaskar is 24lbs and thats a lump

I get away with it as it has some funky brakes and lots of Venhill aluminium bolts where it counts
 

fearfactoryüberalles

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Your frame should be under 1.6 kg weight (my similar one in 17.5" comes at 1.5 kg). If you aim for a weight weenie build, always start with a bare frame, then choose the parts wisely.

A full rigid bike - with some classic-looking non-period parts if needed (alu, titanium, light tires) - should reach the sub-9kg level. Threaded cro-mo forks under 700 gr. do exist, even some steel tri-butted A-head ones reach the sub-750 gr. target (at least I've managed to find a set somehow)-usually takes time to find a good one or you can always choose Ti.

Being over 15st or 96 kg, I've found any bike under 10 kg feels a bit weird and fragile, even if it's perfectly safe to ride for me. Perhaps it's because the rider/bike' weight ratio, dunno, man.

Until my mid-20's I was barely 70 kg, so they might have felt vastly different - sadly I had no access to such machinery back then :roll:
I was happy on my '87 13 kg alu bike with chainstay U-brake :LOL:

XTR stuff - while classy-, not the final word on the ultimate weenie category of MTB parts. So with lots of dough it can be done, BUT
there's one more thing: would you dare to ride it if you are anything but a featherweight :facepalm: :D ?
 

FluffyChicken

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I added a few comments on your build, which is lacking lots of photos ;-)

I missed of switch the hubs out OR find an M950 Ti freehub and Ti axles, undo the wheel nipples and fit Alu ones...

You're getting into silly territory after going for the easy ones and you end up not actually having the bike you wanted, (like the pedals, seat, post, stem, frame, ring three sizes too small, no suspension and holes in everything.


The forks are perfect for the build by the way. Manitou and Marin go well together.
 
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