How to revive a lacquered finish?

Duxuk

Retro Guru
40068450-4201-4e6a-aee6-0cf88005a930.jpeg

Apart from a complete strip and polish or new lacquer is there any other way to improve the corroded lacquer on my frame?
Are stickers available if I do strip it?
 

ishaw

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I dont think there's an easy way to revive that. I have a similar issue on a ti frame. Why it was lacquered I've no idea

Decals you can probably get from Gil_m on here.
 

Dami

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Hi,

You could try some polishing/restoring cream that might work on some of the oxidization. It though depends how deep to the lacquer it has spread. I use those polishing creams (and elbow grease) all the time to old frames and it really brings the shine back and takes away a lot of the surface damages.

At least it would be a cheap alternative to try out before full on lacquer removal and frame polishing work!

-Turkka
 

hamster

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The problem is that the discolouration is under the lacquer: the corrosion runs on the surface of the metal and lifts the lacquer. The only solution really is to strip the lot off and re-polish.
 

Peachy!

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If the blemishes or blooms are only in the lacquer then you can carefully cut this back with fine wet & dry (try 1200) then clear coat over the top.
This is relatively easy, but it’s time consuming.. the more time you take the better it will look, you could test a small area away from the graphics first.

Obvious tips;
Be very careful over the graphics not to ‘cut’ through.
Before you do the whole thing, cut back the lacquer somewhere not too visible and test spray the clear coat.
A spray can of a less aggressive paint like clear Acrylic should do the job.
The whole bike will need a fine cut, even the un-blemished bits so that the clear coat can get a key otherwise it could de-laminate.

**EDIT** as Hamster says, if it's corrosion in the alloy, it's a complete strip down. :cry:
 

Dami

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Good points from the gents here. Fingers crossed it's just some lacquer surface damage, not under it..
 

eshew

Retro Guru
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That looks like oxidized aluminum. You'll want to strip the frame and start researching the best way to remove it. Unfortunately aluminum oxide is harder than aluminum. So you'll want to be careful. Once that's done though, can't recommend mother's polish enough.

Most likely you'll want to follow a good guide on how to restore aluminum rims, as they commonly have the same issues such as https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source= ... hh&ampcf=1
 

Retro Spud

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Don’t want to come across all doom and gloom but are you sure it’s lacquer and not clear anodising

The latter is harder wearing and significantly harder to remove
 

Peachy!

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Page 4 of my Lotus thread...
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=394429&start=30

I took my frames to Allen Chrome, they carefully and profesionally stripped the anodising off for only a few quid..... then the hard work begins ;)
 

Bimly

Retro Guru
It's a problem with all polished alluminium. As a metal, It basically starts to corrode the second its cut or exposed to air. That's why it's a bitch to weld. If you decide to re lacquer the frame, it needs to be clean and done asap after polishing and de greasing. However, the reality is it will fail in time, especially if it's not sprayed in a very controlled environment. I personally dont bother, instead in the past I have lightly oiled the frame with acf50 or akin and then re polish whenever you like.
 
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