Crank Removal Tool

Ian W

Retro Guru
I'm stripping my 93 Zaskar for a bit a refresh and I need to remove the crank set.

Can anyone recommend a reasonably priced tool? Cheap ones on eBay / Amazon haven't got great reviews but I also don't want to spend a shed load on what is likely to be a one time use....

Planning on replacing the crankset so it does have to come off :)

Thanks :D
 

Tootyred

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For what my advice is worth.....dont get one with a handle on it......its what spanners are for! Even a cheap spanner (or even better socket) will give you a stronger handle.

As for make. If your not an animal (which is often the reason tools get broken) try the draper one, normally 4 quid. Ive had one years and use it all the time with no problems.

If it feels stuck.....it might well be, so instead of jiggering the tool and the thread .......spray it with supercrack, wd40, anything......then try later.

All imo.
 

Nabeaquam

Retro Guru
I have a 70s Peugeot that I found in a dumpster behind a bicycle shop. They used a BSA threaded extractor instead of a French thread and stripped the threads and were unable to pull the arms. It was a nice vintage crank set so I removed the arms so it could be repacked by using a small automotive pickle fork tool. It came right off. This is only a last resort because the pounding will put small dents in the back of the arms. You really can’t see the dent but I know it’s there.
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DrGooGoo

Retro Guru
I'm stripping my 93 Zaskar for a bit a refresh and I need to remove the crank set.

Can anyone recommend a reasonably priced tool? Cheap ones on eBay / Amazon haven't got great reviews but I also don't want to spend a shed load on what is likely to be a one time use....

Planning on replacing the crankset so it does have to come off :)

Thanks :D
Buy a Park Tool one.
Park Tools are usually worth the investment.
 

ishaw

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As with a lot of things, especially tools, you get what you pay for. I still have one I bought decades ago, can't remember the brand but from my lbs, still works. That said, I treated myself to some nicer tools as I was building more bikes. Park tool one I got is great, one with a handle, can't remember the model number. Removed many a BB with it, no hassles or issues. Worth the investment, even if you only use it a few times. You know you've got the right tool for the job if you ever need it.
 

sunympholepsy

Kona Fan
I have used many different ones at work. Park, Var, Cyclo etc. They all do the job pretty well. My favourite though is a Shimano. You only need a 15mm spanner instead of two different ones you usually need for others. Made really well too. I have had mine for over a decade and is as good as new.
 

raidan73

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I've had plenty of the little ones where you supply your own spanner to extract the crank. I've stripped threads a few times over the years and this may be down to me being ham fisted, and it may be just a coincidence, but this has never happened since I got the Park tool with the handle. The handle isn't that long but you can always slide an extension bar over it for extra leverage
 

Nabeaquam

Retro Guru
Park tool Is the one. They no longer come with the reversible extractor, one side BSA the other French, just BSA. The lever is short enough that the pedals don’t get in the way. I’ve had these starting in the 1970s. I wore my first one out, but recently acquired a vintage one with both extractor heads. I also have a new one and it’s identical except for the missing French side. I also have the Shimano version, but that is in my traveling tools. I’ve only used it once, so I can’t speak for long term durability but it would probably last and it worked as well as the Park. I don’t like it because it’s not as convenient as the Park. I have many shop grade tools, shop grade is the way to go. Mainly Park and Var. I weld so I have made alignment tools. No need to buy them if your not a shop because they are almost never used. I tossed out my homemade frame table when we moved because it was made from pored concrete and melamine boards. I kept the jig rails. I only used the frame table once to build a klunker mountain bike frame. I made an error in my frame design (weak spot in down tube where the seat post ended) and the frame cracked In 3 months. It’s now hanging, for many years bolted to a wood post, on a mountain bike trail called the Rusty Bike Trail. Someone walked off with the original rusty bike so I replaced it, permanently. Ha.
 
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