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 Post subject: Fitting a Fixed Chain.
PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 6:56 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 7:18 pm
Posts: 3798
Location: Staffordshire
I am fitting a new chainring to my fixed. I will therefore need a new chain which I have purchased. The bike has track ends and my question is this; where in the dropouts is the axle best located?

Also, is the chain best having a little slack? If so, how much up and down movement is recommended?


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 7:06 pm 
Pumpy's Bear
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Posts: 8145
Location: Hereford
Iwasgoodonce wrote:
I am fitting a new chainring to my fixed. I will therefore need a new chain which I have purchased. The bike has track ends and my question is this; where in the dropouts is the axle best located?

Also, is the chain best having a little slack? If so, how much up and down movement is recommended?


I've always assumed/guessed that somewhere in the middle of the dropouts is good - you don't want a chain so short that the wheel has to be in the forward part of the dropout as you'll never get it in/out!

Regarding tension, my rule of thumb is to get it as tight as possible without binding. That will give a bit of up and down play, perhaps half an inch, when you press on the chain - it definitely shouldn't droop!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 7:11 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Location: Staffordshire
Cheers Ed. 52x18 goodness here I come!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 7:52 pm 
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In the middle of the drop-outs is good - then you have a little allowance for the chain stretching and you allow yourself enough movement for a ratio either side.

Tension is a bit of a personal thing. You can run it tight, but spin the wheel and crank and make sure there aren't any tight spots. A tight chain makes a grinding noise, which I don't like, so I run a tiny bit of slack, but only enough so that it runs silently. You'll feel a slack chain when you ride because you'll feel the movement back and forth on the cranks. Don't run it so slack that the chain hangs down because you don't want to throw the chain. Keep then chain oiled and it won't rattle.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2012 8:06 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:57 pm
Posts: 774
Yes - need to leave some room to get the wheel out. Likewise, running the chain bar tight makes it noisy and wears the chain quicker too. Whilst you could get away with it using pukka NJS kit and an Izumi chain, in the real world about 10mm of vertical movement keeps things a lot quieter and a bit less 'graunchy'


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