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 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:26 am 
Retro Guru
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Location: It's not easy being a dolphin.
doctor-bond wrote:
https://www.amazon.com/Roads-Were-Not-B ... 1610916891


So - it goes something like this:

Bikes became; they were good - on rough roads, they were better with fat tyres. Bikes became popular; therefore, roads improved; so bikes with fat tyres weren't needed by most; some retro grouches kept building them anyway, because they could (and their roads were not that good and didn't go where they wanted to anyway).

[Some wars happened and people focussed on things other than bikes]

Bikes prevailed. Bikes got people around.

A few people tried to sell the bikes that they were building with fat tyres because they loved their bikes and wanted others to love their bikes, and still make money to eat.

People liked bikes with fat tyres because the bikes were comfortable and could go places. And now that life was easier, they had time to do shit that didn't involve fighting wars or getting food.

Many bikes with fat tyres were made, and bought: some were ridden.

Some guys with memories and beer habits tried to remember why they liked bikes with fat tyres. Some said it was because of the fantastic sport; others remembered riding through puddles or down a hill, maybe up one. A few had pictures of themselves and a fat-tyred bike in a strange place. All were convinced that bikes with fat tyres defined the limits of civilisation.

They can't all be wrong: bikes with fat tyres define the limits of civilisation. And while civilisation prevails, there can be no need to define what makes a fat-tyred bike.

8)


.....not forgetting the fact that some Japanese business men did their research properly before venturing out. At
that time, getting a Sushi and Saki in New York was easy. Back in York however, fritters and mushy peas washed
down with Theakstons was the order of the day.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:39 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:42 am
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More likely to be one of the Smiths in York. (Sam or John)


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:31 pm 
P.o.T.M. Winner / MacRetro Rider
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Location: In the foothills of the foothills of The Cairngorm Massif :D
mattr wrote:
More likely to be one of the Smiths in York. (Sam or John)


:D


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 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 2:59 pm 
North Wales Deputy AEC
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GrahamJohnWallace wrote:

However, It turned out that cycling over bumps was actually more fun than riding on smooth tarmac.
The same thing also applied to driving cars so speed bumps and pot holes were invented.



:lol:


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 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 3:16 pm 
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Location: N.E.England
GrahamJohnWallace wrote:
GrahamJohnWallace wrote:
Interestingly the earliest record of a US style mountain-bike being displayed at UK bicycle show was also 1981 at York. The bike was made by an nuclear physicist and amateur frame builder called Tony Oliver.

If the Japanese bike industry had attended York instead of New York that year, then they might have thought that the design originated here. In a report the reaction of the UK cycle trade to this lone mountain-bike appearing at York is described as "incredulous".


I bikepacked with an old friend about 9 years ago who had an Oliver. He'd done all sorts of rough stuff on it.

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 Post subject: Re: Re:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 4:10 pm 
retrobike rider
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rwm1962 wrote:
I bikepacked with an old friend about 9 years ago who had an Oliver. He'd done all sorts of rough stuff on it.

Thanks, "rwm1962. That's what I love about RetroBike, Google didn't produce a picture of a Tony Oliver mountain-bike but Retrobike members can.

Making a mountain bike in the UK in 1981 would have been dificult as you would be retricted to using the available motorbike, touring bicycle and BMX components. Until the Japanese started making 26" mountain bike specific rims and tyres the Americans would have had similar problems. Though they had the advantage of having a readily available supply of fat 26" Uniroyal 'Knobby' tyres.

In the Uk in 1981 the easiest way to get hold or 26" rims and fat, though not very nobbly, tyres was to take them off the newly launched Raleigh Bomber. However these has chrome plated steel rims and those that have riden such rims will know that they are heavy and absolutely useless when wet.

Alternatively Tony Oliver could have used high quality French 650B alloy rims and 40mm wide randonneur tyres. However this would make the his 1981 'York' bike very simmilar to custom made roughstuff bikes who's British origins appear to date from the 1950s.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:09 pm 
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Location: N.E.England
You're welcome. I'm pretty sure this was the bike he used for an epic trip in Norway in the 80's. I may still have the magazine article which may help narrow down the date on this one. Pretty sure it was custom or part custom made.
Some more pics:

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:17 pm 
King of the Skip Monkeys
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Location: Bournemouth's most wanted
blimey!!!


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:44 pm 
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Location: N.E.England
Not found the article yet but the trip was in 1986 to Lappland - the fella who owned the bike above & Tony Oliver himself


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 7:00 pm 
North Wales Deputy AEC
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This fellow?


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