Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Sat Dec 03, 2016 5:56 am

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 2:00 am 
rBoTM Winner
rBoTM Winner

Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2010 3:44 pm
Posts: 422
Location: at my computer
Mauro Fossati, was a frame-builder and mechanic who came from Novi Ligure. Novi Ligure is often referred to as the city of the campionissimi (city of super champions), this because it was the home town of Giardengo as well as Fausto and Serse Coppi.

You can find write-ups about Fossati as well as many prominent cyclists from Novi Ligure on the township website here: http://www.comunenoviligure.gov.it/serv ... ro_Fossati

It is only fitting that somebody who grew up in the hotbed of Italian cycling and had great mechanical aptitude would become a top-notch framebuilder and mechanic. Fossati was born in 1916 and passed away in 1977 after having spent over 40 years working in the bicycle industry and sport. His most prestigious work was undoubtedly as Fausto Coppi's head mechanic (with the Carpano-Coppi and Tricolfina Coppi pro teams), however if you ever get the chance to see one of his frames up close, you will see something special. The workmanship is absolutely first rate, especially when one considers that he did not have the benefit of modern mechanical tools and components. His file work is well-balanced and clean yielding lovely minimalist lugs.

If you have never looked closely at lugs, may I suggest that you look at these photos and then compare the lugs to those on the next bike that you come across. Observe how the transition from the greatest thickness of the lug gradually thins out as it reaches it edge (you can also close your eyes and simply feel the difference too). The consider how the shape of the various lugs fit together with one another.

As far as components go, the bike features the one seatstay lever Campagnolo derailleur which was given the name Paris Roubaix after Coppi won the 1950 race of the same name. This particular derailleur predates this race victory as it has not Paris-Roubaix marking on the chain guide. The hubs have 1949 cones, so I believe the bike dates from 1949 or early 1950. The chainset is a Magistroni Senior, the headset a Magistroni Zenith, the bars are Ambrosio Champion, the stem is an Ambrosio adjustable stem that is more commonly found on track bikes. The saddle is "butchered" Brooks B17; it may be original to the bike. It has been lowered and reshaped. It still shows the oval shaped logo on the skirts. Given the derailleur, I have fitted Clément Paris Roubaix tubulars. The brake calipers are Universal Mod. 39. The hubs are FB with Campagnolo Q/R skewers and Ambrosio rims.


Attachments:
8.JPG
8.JPG [ 136.24 KiB | Viewed 1350 times ]
7.JPG
7.JPG [ 179.49 KiB | Viewed 1350 times ]
6.JPG
6.JPG [ 96.57 KiB | Viewed 1350 times ]
5.JPG
5.JPG [ 146.03 KiB | Viewed 1350 times ]
Second_photo_Fossati.JPG
Second_photo_Fossati.JPG [ 211 KiB | Viewed 1350 times ]
First_photo_Fossati.JPG
First_photo_Fossati.JPG [ 228.23 KiB | Viewed 1350 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 2:03 am 
rBoTM Winner
rBoTM Winner

Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2010 3:44 pm
Posts: 422
Location: at my computer
some additional photos


Attachments:
16.JPG
16.JPG [ 194.18 KiB | Viewed 1348 times ]
15.JPG
15.JPG [ 121.35 KiB | Viewed 1348 times ]
14.JPG
14.JPG [ 177.67 KiB | Viewed 1348 times ]
13.JPG
13.JPG [ 201.31 KiB | Viewed 1348 times ]
12.JPG
12.JPG [ 184.77 KiB | Viewed 1348 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:14 am 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 16, 2010 9:15 pm
Posts: 343
Nice. A stunning example of a bike from that period is Coppi's 1949 TdF Bianchi, which is succintly described and lavishly photographed in Jan Heine's excellent book The Competition Bicycle. In case anyone thinks filing lugs was something top builders always did back then, have a look at the 1948 Wilier that Heine contrasts with the Bianchi. Heine also includes measurements on geometry that in themselves make quite fascinating reading.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 9:16 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Fri May 21, 2010 6:08 pm
Posts: 418
Location: U K
That is a thing of beauty!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 2:12 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Fri Oct 28, 2011 12:59 pm
Posts: 349
Location: Chez Vegas, Derbyshire
Nice bike and back history. Interesting that it's got mudguard fixings on.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 3:41 pm 
rBoTM Winner
rBoTM Winner

Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2010 3:44 pm
Posts: 422
Location: at my computer
vivelesalpes wrote:
Nice bike and back history. Interesting that it's got mudguard fixings on.


Back then virtually all bikes had mudguard fittings (even the bikes that the pros rode on!)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 9:21 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Aug 22, 2010 7:07 pm
Posts: 1321
Location: Cotswolds
C d M, What a classy example, it makes the best the big makers did look poor at best. And Bianchi were very heavy.
The fortunate racer who had this bike probably needed mudguards for training.
I last rode my P/R gear in an open road race in 1956. I had 14 - 24 with 48 x 51 on the front. No problem with the chain length in exreme gears, and used a Campagnolo H/B control to allow undoing the wheel, but pedalling forward to change the front. There is a neat adjustible cam and ratchet to move the wheel slightly forward as the QR tightens, to make sure the chain is not tight. The real problem with these and "Osgears" was the chain runs much better if fed onto the cogs in line. (apart from the obvious)

I could be wrong, but the front hub might have the alternate countersinks for the spoke holes, which were intended to suppport the bend, not hide the spoke head. European wheels were mostly built with the inside spokes in opposite directions, in this case it may be that the angle and stagger did not allow this.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 10:26 pm 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 7:45 pm
Posts: 10934
Location: kent
that is stunning .

any chance of a pic of the rear gears ?



i have an Oscar Egg bike fom same era in the garage in france .


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2012 5:29 am 
rBoTM Winner
rBoTM Winner
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 27, 2012 1:14 pm
Posts: 46
Location: Melb, Aus
Wow! That's hot!

Btw, what seatpost is that?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2012 9:27 am 
rBoTM Winner
rBoTM Winner

Joined: Sat Aug 28, 2010 3:44 pm
Posts: 422
Location: at my computer
Kevinwulf wrote:
Wow! That's hot!

Btw, what seatpost is that?


I have two seatposts for the bike. For show I generally fit the standard steel seat post, when I ride the bike I need the saddle a bit higher than is possible with the steel seatpost so I have turned the Nitor seatpost to fit the bike. If I have time, I'll take another photo with the other seatpost.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 22 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group