The Official Retrobike Fixed and S/S thread

aimme

Retro Newbie
early ~90's french cyfac fixie.

qX9rNW6.jpg
 

caemis

Senior Retro Guru
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Hi! No pics but a question:

Since my Gazelle is to big for me (63.5cm c-t with literarly no stand over left) I am looking for something to replace it. I want to keep it vintage, so a more modern approach (i.e. tracklocross) is out of question for now.

I might can buy a classic italian track frame probably from the 70s/80s but I am a bit uncertain of using it on light gravel (steep STA/HTA) and how a different fork (more rake same a-c but brake mounts) would affect the handling.

What do you think?
 

Nabeaquam

Dirt Disciple
Hi! No pics but a question:

Since my Gazelle is to big for me (63.5cm c-t with literarly no stand over left) I am looking for something to replace it. I want to keep it vintage, so a more modern approach (i.e. tracklocross) is out of question for now.

I might can buy a classic italian track frame probably from the 70s/80s but I am a bit uncertain of using it on light gravel (steep STA/HTA) and how a different fork (more rake same a-c but brake mounts) would affect the handling.

What do you think?
70s - 80s road geometry is pretty much the same as modern gravel geometry. Track geometry is different, not good for gravel. I have ridden a track bike on light gravel for about 8 miles, not too good in my opinion. Better in parking lots and bike paths. You would have to drill the fork, or use a road fork and a clamp on rear brake, or drill the frame for a rear brake mount, not a good idea for a vintage track frame In my opinion. If you have space I would use the Italian track bike frame for fixed gear with cages to keep your feet away from the tire when turning, and get something like a straight gauge 70s Japanese touring frame and fork for gravel. If you aren’t going to load down the Japanese frame with 50 pounds of touring stuff for gravel a butted frame would work. The stays may need spreading and if you go over 28s you will have to dimple the stays to accommodate wider tires. I have a 70s Japanese touring frame converted into a gravel shifty and 4 vintage fixed gear track bikes (East German, British and American) for the bike path. Most track bikes only take narrow tires, which could be disastrous if the gravel is fine or loose, especially with the upright and tight geometry of a track bike. It could be done but it’s far from good.
 

caemis

Senior Retro Guru
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70s - 80s road geometry is pretty much the same as modern gravel geometry. Track geometry is different, not good for gravel. I have ridden a track bike on light gravel for about 8 miles, not too good in my opinion. Better in parking lots and bike paths. You would have to drill the fork, or use a road fork and a clamp on rear brake, or drill the frame for a rear brake mount, not a good idea for a vintage track frame In my opinion. If you have space I would use the Italian track bike frame for fixed gear with cages to keep your feet away from the tire when turning, and get something like a straight gauge 70s Japanese touring frame and fork for gravel. If you aren’t going to load down the Japanese frame with 50 pounds of touring stuff for gravel a butted frame would work. The stays may need spreading and if you go over 28s you will have to dimple the stays to accommodate wider tires. I have a 70s Japanese touring frame converted into a gravel shifty and 4 vintage fixed gear track bikes (East German, British and American) for the bike path. Most track bikes only take narrow tires, which could be disastrous if the gravel is fine or loose, especially with the upright and tight geometry of a track bike. It could be done but it’s far from good.
Thanks for your answer. This was helpful indeed. If we would have a path/track racing option in Berlin (there is only one, the Velodrome, unfortunately inside and open just for those with fancy membership cards of cycling teams). So exept from occaisonally riding on the streets a pure track frame would make much sense for long and even offroad rides, especially with your insight on position...
 
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