Scanning and 3D printing impossible to find vintage parts

SuperSid

Devout Dirtbag
For a bike project I recently finished, I wanted to fit some Shimano 600 AX brake calipers, I found some second hand ones cheap and also received some 600 AX brake levers with my purchase.
As you might have guessed there were no hoods, they had obviously shriveled up and disintegrated with age. Unfortunately you can't find replacement hoods unless you pay a fortune for extremely rare NOS items still in their plastic packet. So my AX brake levers will most likely remain in my parts bin (I realise there are some Dia compe hoods or others that might fit over the levers but they don't look right)

I'm an industrial designer, I know how to 3D model and have produced quite a few useful 3D printed parts for my bikes. I have scanned several parts and used the scan data as a base to recreate the product with my 3D software.

It got me thinking, if someone somewhere could get an intact AX brake hood 3D scanned at a 3D scanning/modelling/printing specialist, an accurate 3D model could be created and 3D printed in soft TPU to cover all those naked AX levers lying in parts bins around the world.

There are websites from where people with 3D printers at home (that are able to print flexible filaments) can download the file and print the model in the filament and colour of their choice:


I suggest that you list the part that you need here with pics and other relevant info just in case someone has that part and can get it scanned, (you might have to agree to pay for the scanning costs) There might be other 3D modellers on this website that are able to model the part from the scan.
It's like an open source project where retrobike lovers help each other out.
 

Yogi bear

Retro Guru
The best bet would be to use an intact hood to create a mold rather than scan it. Then use the mold to cast a silicone or rubber part. There is someone on here that is doing this for Onza porcipaw grips and other plastic parts, but i can remember their name.
 

SuperSid

Devout Dirtbag
The best bet would be to use an intact hood to create a mold rather than scan it. Then use the mold to cast a silicone or rubber part. There is someone on here that is doing this for Onza porcipaw grips and other plastic parts, but i can remember their name.
That's a good solution too but the 3D scan/print route provides a solution to everyone, anywhere in the world with access to the internet and a 3D printer.
 

mdvineng

Senior Retro Guru
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You would need to scan the exterior while fitted to a former or brake lever, then scan the the lever and merge the two filles, as they tend to sit deformed when free and the older the hood, the smaller they become.
 

SuperSid

Devout Dirtbag
Here is an example of a handlebar grip I 3D modelled, finely printed in a flexible TPU filament (Recreus Filaflex).
It was printed vertically and the 0.1mm layer lines are barely visible.
 

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    Grip.jpg
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SuperSid

Devout Dirtbag
You would need to scan the exterior while fitted to a former or brake lever, then scan the the lever and merge the two filles, as they tend to sit deformed when free and the older the hood, the smaller they become.

Yes and preferably the scan would be of a pristine NOS set like these, although even a used set in good condition would probably be good enough.



1618643846822.png
 

fastpedaller

Dirt Disciple
Here is an example of a handlebar grip I 3D modelled, finely printed in a flexible TPU filament (Recreus Filaflex).
It was printed vertically and the 0.1mm layer lines are barely visible.
That's impressive! One question though....... If the original is a tight fit of the bar, is there a need to factor into the file a small 'shrinkage' so the new one is a tight fit?
 

SuperSid

Devout Dirtbag
That's impressive! One question though....... If the original is a tight fit of the bar, is there a need to factor into the file a small 'shrinkage' so the new one is a tight fit?
Thanks!
The inner diameter of those grips was exactly the same as the handlebar, at first it felt loose after I slid it on but it seems to be firmly attached now, possibly a vacuum effect?
There might need to be a few adjustments like you suggest to get the best fit. The TPU I used is probably the softest that I can use with my 3D printer, it's slightly less flexible than most modern hoods but not as soft as old school rubber ones. If you get them printed by a specialist with a more suitable printer, the softness and flexibility can be increased. so maybe the 3D model needs to be adjusted again for a tighter fit.

Here is an older YouTube video demonstrating the various flexible filaments that were available then.

It will be a challenge to get everything looking nice, I suspect for the hoods, some extra support material might be required that will be trimmed away at the end in order to get a smooth looking finish.

This flexible filament is close to the original Shimano AX groupset's special mint green colour.

1618739490744.png
 
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mdvineng

Senior Retro Guru
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My 3D printing was mostly in Ti6-4AV powder or Mg, some extensive WAAM and ALM research too. Now retired but still helping the research group on occasions. My Partner is investigating ALM Mg for internal body use in the Medical field at Madrid University as part of her research and lecturing role.
 
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