A Netflix build special… (JMC Replica)

Joe*Pro

Senior Retro Guru
Looks like you've cut them a little short?! Were these complimented by a ripped and tanned torso just like JMC back in the day? 😜

Back to the bike itself. What an absolute beauty. Great to see how this has progressed over the years and well done sticking with it. I'd be grinning from ear-to-ear too if I rode this.
I assure you they are not hot pants 🙈 and yes I’ve had the six pack abs since birth. 🤣. I just can’t find the period correct woolly hat for the topless shot ! 🤪 Or a decent monkey puzzle tree back drop 🌲
 

Joe*Pro

Senior Retro Guru
To finish the week off, all the way from Wrocław, Poland, a box fresh Shimano Deore XT SQ-M730 seat post quick release, for not NOS money, instead of the knock off I had, minor tweaks to go now. The only difference in this tweak is the little nut on the top 🙈 but I know it’s now correct 🧐

but should I paint that titanium seat collar black to match the original of jmc‘s ? …if I’d do it with the mrs nail varnish it’ll be easy enough to wipe off if change mind.
 

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nicklej

Old School Hero
What a lovely build! I also like the added detail of where the parts were sourced from and how much they cost. It puts rebuilding a bike into perspective and the difficulty of sourcing parts that are required :)
 

Joe*Pro

Senior Retro Guru
What a lovely build! I also like the added detail of where the parts were sourced from and how much they cost. It puts rebuilding a bike into perspective and the difficulty of sourcing parts that are required :)
Thanks v much. As it was my first proper nut and bolt build from scratch rather than the usual buy a full bike and tweak it builds. It really stood out to me that parts are spread and acquired world wide, justifying the cost of some rare parts is also part of the challenge, so seemed obvious to me to document and illustrate As part of the journey.

I’m surprised others don’t do it more. If I’d of known this earlier on things might have been a bit quicker. ‘World wide searches and get realistic on price with certain parts’.
 
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nicklej

Old School Hero
I also would like to see that more often. I'm a lover of stats and details so seeing small extra details like that are interesting :)
It's shame when you need a certain part and theres not many of them but the price isn't right. I have that problem now with a few parts i need for a build I am working on! 🚲
 

Joe*Pro

Senior Retro Guru
I also would like to see that more often. I'm a lover of stats and details so seeing small extra details like that are interesting :)
It's shame when you need a certain part and theres not many of them but the price isn't right. I have that problem now with a few parts i need for a build I am working on! 🚲
The XT seat quick release was exactly that, they have been available NOS £40-£50 from the start, but that seems ridiculous money, I’m still doing this on a £50 a week hobby budget,(average cost of build has been less than £10 a week in total) just couldn’t bring myself to spend that on such a small part with fair few available. The crud bung and other rarer parts I’d of paid triple figures in the blink of an eye, as you see them once in 5 years.
 
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Joe*Pro

Senior Retro Guru
Is it ok if I drop this JMC image here?

1993, Mammoth. Snowboard goggles

View attachment 638782
Some of Jason’s storey as written by his dad, which I think goes with that picture:

A bit of telephonic persuasion by his mum had got him an entry for the Eliminator in California and that was our next stop. It was there that he earned his big break, riding down the infamous Kamikaze course in his skin suit against armoured riders. I should say riding out of his skin suit, because his performances – all ten of them – were World class. His mechanical back-up was one spare tyre carried by Rory Hitchens at the bottom and two spare inner tubes, compared with full mechanical, and even spare bike back up enjoyed by the other riders. The night before the Eliminator, I had to go begging to the GT truck for a rear triangle for the RTS, as the one on the bike had cracked under the strain of the season’s racing. They gave me one which had come off a team bike and had been replaced as part of their ongoing maintenance program.

We sat on the floor of the apartment that night with some tools borrowed from the guys downstairs rebuilding the bike for the next day’s race. His second place in the Eliminator did two things – it gave us enough money (second place money was $3,000) to go to the next round of the Grundigs in New York, and it was to be the deciding factor in his sponsorship deal in 94.

The GT finally gave up the ghost at Hunter Mountain in New York, when the top tube parted company from the rest of the bike. His ‘cautious’ run with the broken bike was enough to give him seventh spot. Returning tired but victorious to the UK, he wrapped up his season by grabbing his first national downhill title. The last Grundig was in Kaprun, where his ninth placing left him with an overall ranking of ten. The World’s in Metabief were a total disaster for him – he crashed, and was disqualified for leaving and entering the course at different places.

words by Jim McRoy
 
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