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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2008 9:56 pm 
North Wales AEC / OWMTBC 2010 Champion
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Any body know which settings is which? Supposed to be able to move the rear shock between 2 holes, one was supposed to be downhill and other cross country :?

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2008 10:50 pm 
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I'm guessing the next hole on the left in the picture gives the full 3" of travel, but it's only a guess.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2008 11:00 pm 
retrobike rider
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remove the spring from the shock and measure the rear axle movement in both mount positions

im not too clued up on rear shocks but i think if you wind the preload collar off ( up ) the lower spring collar will slide out so the spring can be removed , but dont hold me to it :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2008 11:03 pm 
North Wales AEC / OWMTBC 2010 Champion
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Cheers guys, good tips there!


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2008 11:48 pm 
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You could also try measuring the sag in both mount positions, as the coil tension might change once the angle of the coil is changed in relation to the rocker arm. You'll have to use the eye to eye method, measuring the distance between both bolt mounts for the shock and measuring the same again while sitting on the bike in a normal ride position (yes, you'll need another person but don't have to remove the spring), then subtract the second measurment from the first. You might also just be able to feel which is more plush without measuring. It's pictured in the catalogue in the next mount position if that means anything, and the description mentions 3" of travel, so they may be showing the longer travel position (?) If all else fails: tech@konaworld.com


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 15, 2008 11:55 pm 
North Wales AEC / OWMTBC 2010 Champion
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Kona Paul wrote:
You could also try measuring the sag in both mount positions, as the coil tension might change once the angle of the coil is changed in relation to the rocker arm. You'll have to use the eye to eye method, measuring the distance between both bolt mounts for the shock and measuring the same again while sitting on the bike in a normal ride position (yes, you'll need another person but don't have to remove the spring), then subtract the second measurment from the first. You might also just be able to feel which is more plush without measuring. It's pictured in the catalogue in the next mount position if that means anything, and the description mentions 3" of travel, so they may be showing the longer travel position (?) If all else fails: tech@konaworld.com


That's the sort of lines I was thinking of, but so far have been too lazy to actually put it into action! I think you are right though, the left one will give more travel, but it also changes the angle. I may use that email, thanks :D

As an aside, I don't think my '98 Mokomoko is retro enough for retro chat, noticed it got moved :cry: Modern light seem to be retro though :?


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 12:21 am 
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:x :? id say a full suspension frame with 3 inches of travel and a canti hanger built in to the rear was pretty retro :?:


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 12:40 am 
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I'd say so, too. Many definitions for retro here, but a common one seems to be 10 years or more ago. 98 was 10 years ago. And yes, the idea of 3-4" being plenty of travel for freeride and DH bikes is pretty retro by today's 7-10" standards.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 2:02 am 
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I don't think the technical details for the 1998 range were ever put online, but the 97 and 99 seem very similar, so the following which is from 99 probably applies to 98 also:

"Cross-Country Dual Suspension
MANOMANO, MOKOMOKO, KING KIKAPU
Kona Cross-Country dual suspension bikes are suited for lightweight, cross-country trail performance. Ideal for long-distance mountain biking & cross-country racing. Frame without shock weighs less than 5 pounds. Lightweight components are used throughout. The latest in Fox suspension shocks, Air Vanilla, with Air Negative function is featured for high efficiency and light weight. Not recommended for downhill racing, dual slalom, tricks or stunts. Not designed for double clamp suspension forks - warranty is voided.

- Active, rising rate design built around a Fox Air Vanilla shock.
- With a leverage ratio of 2.33:1, the rear wheel has 3.5" of travel.
- Main chainstay pivot is located 30mm above the horizontal hub axle plane, minimizing "pogo" effects caused by changes in the effective chainstay length. This location keeps the drivetrain length very consistent. It also helps to eliminate pedaling force from activating the suspension.
- Rectangular tapered rear stays connect to cold-forged swingarms
- Cartridge bearing pivots on seat tube/rocker pivot, bushing and bottom bracket yoke.
- Custom valved Fox Air Vanilla (Manomano), Fox Air Vanilla R (Mokomoko) and Fox Air Vanilla RC (King Kikapu), all with Air Negative spring function."

The striking thing is that, although you are under the impression that moving the seat tube/rocker pivot is part of the design, there is no mention of moving it in the technical notes. You're also saying that one of the settings is a DH setting, but the description makes it clear that the MokoMoko was designed as a light xc bike and not as a DH bike.

The advice that Paul is giving is also in the tech doc, but you have to do that anyway to get the sag correct and you adjust the sag by adjusting the shock, not by moving the pivot.

I may be wrong, but I don't believe there is any intention that you move that pivot at all - I think you should be using the position on the corner of the V. I agree with Paul though - don't believe me, write to Tech@konaworld.com for authoritative advice.

There are modern bikes which you can reset to a DH mode, but this is generally in relation to setting an adjustable fork to max and by lowering the bottom bracket, so as to slacken the head angle right off, which is what you need for DH. But as you say, the 98 MokoMoko is a retro bike by any sensible definition, and I don't think it was designed for anything like that. It's just an XC bike.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2008 10:04 am 
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I was actualy wondering where the DH came into it, as it's not mentioned in the catalogue, but as I didn't have the tech document I assumed it might have been mentioned there instead. The only mention of DH is "Beyond pure downhill, the new Mokomoko is a fusion of the Stab's walking beam rear suspension and the Kula's freeriding trait's", meaning it shares the suspension design of the Stab (as did the Manomano, but not the U'hu and King Kikapu.) So if two mount posistions aren't mentioned in the tech doc., you should probably stick with the one pictured (one position left of where your's is now in the picture posted.)

Just to be sure, though I don't think this is what Anthony was saying, I wasn't suggesting that measuring sag has anything to do with changing mount positions, only that it could be measured in both positions. That's probably obvious though.

Definitely write tech. Where did you get the info that it has two mounting positions for the shock by the way?


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