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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:22 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider

Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2007 11:22 pm
Posts: 7305
Location: Hove
Just to be clear, I'm talking about a tyre that when you put it on, the straight line across when you have it partially on and have to start forcing is about 30cm, not the 10-15cm or so you might normally expect to get. I don't see what advantage there could be from using three levers. I don't think you could even get three levers under the bead. Even with two, I could only just turn them out and then the most I could separate them by hand was 2cm, which was a huge effort and then they were completely stuck. I thought I was making it clear that they were completely stuck when I said that it took hard hammering on the free one to force it down the rim - about a mm for every hammer blow. Could somebody explain please how a third lever would help, assuming you could get it under the bead?

You shouldn't have to use a hammer for any bike job except removing a headset cup in my opinion.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:26 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 5:17 pm
Posts: 3775
Location: Norn Iron
I used three levers and a strap when i had probs but the first ones i used were plastic and they broke - the alloy levers worked but i had to be careful with the rims. I think i was putting a Schalbe on a Wolber Alpine rim - total nightmare.

My memory has let me down but there is a tool which, apparently, is excellent - some form of 'super tyre lever' - someone should know what it is called.

Richard


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 8:14 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Mon Jun 17, 2013 11:07 am
Posts: 165
I'm also running 517s but with Continental Travelcontact and they are an absolute BITCH to get on the rims. Have to use at least 2 steel tyre levers.

Having said that, my MTB tyres are Continental Vapor 2.1 and they're alright to get on :? .


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 9:25 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2008 2:36 pm
Posts: 4007
Location: uk
make sure all the air is out of the inner tube..........and the tire bead that is on and in the rim well can then sit in the deepest part of the rim 'opposite' the last bit of bead your trying to squeese on,.......sometimes you arefighting against the bead opposite sitting futher away on a rim shoulder, instead of in the inner deeper (closer to you) bit (with tube nice and flat).......depends of the internal rim profile too of course


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 10:46 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 3:07 pm
Posts: 4211
Location: London for my sin's
Some tyre/rim combos are tight but modern tubeless are a bindingly tight fit before you add any slight variation.
I Know when i put contis on my old Crosslands it was a massive effort to get them pumped up and the beads seated corectly(track pump and 70 plus psi before a loud pin as the bead seated).

No real advice to give other than what you already know!
Tube deflated (no brainer if its a puncture).
Tyre pinched out of the bead on both sides and loose in the well/center channel.
Use two levers about 4" apart (or as far as you can hook them and turn them on the rim) and lock one onto a spoke and work the other one away from the locked lever.

I'm currently using pedros as they are wider and stronger but have still broken 2 in the last 6 months due to tight tyre bead/rim fit


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 11:16 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 5:17 pm
Posts: 3775
Location: Norn Iron
Just for clarity, i usually keep some air in the tube to make sure it does not get nipped - bad idea? I mean that there is just enough air to keep the tube in place inside the tyre and not enough pressure to cause problems when fitting the tyre.

Richard

p.s. does no one know what the 'super tyre lever' is actually called?


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 12:03 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2009 2:37 pm
Posts: 1726
Location: UK Southwest
If it works for you then its not a bad idea. For the record I do it too.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 04, 2013 10:44 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sat Jul 04, 2009 4:41 pm
Posts: 1696
spray mr sheen spray polish on the rim an tyre wait for a minute then try again


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 05, 2013 7:52 am 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Sun Sep 05, 2010 1:10 am
Posts: 4756
Location: Heathfield, East Sussex
I have some 700C Halo Twin Rails on Mavic rims that I dunno how I'm going to remove; had to use two steel tyre levers to get them on! :shock:

Having been born in the Jurassic Period I can remember when all tyres were like that... :oops:


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