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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 6:02 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2011 7:28 am
Posts: 300
Location: Fife
Plants are great, but they belong outside.


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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 8:02 am 
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Joined: Tue Aug 07, 2007 12:22 pm
Posts: 2942
Location: Platsa, Messinias, Greece
As promised, a photo of the clivia in bloom.
My wife got it about thirty-five years ago and she tells me that it seemed quite old and established then.
Anyway, if we treat it properly it rewards us with flowers like this, once every year.
What's not to like?

I'd rather have plants in the house than bikes, any day. The only bike related task that I do in the house is wheel building.


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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 8:07 am 
South East AEC
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Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2007 3:39 pm
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You ask is there any point to house plants, the answer is a resounding yes, and here you go -

Breathing Easier

When you breathe, your body takes in oxygen and releases carbon dioxide. During photosynthesis, plants absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen. This opposite pattern of gas use makes plants and people natural partners. Adding plants to interior spaces can increase oxygen levels.

At night, photosynthesis ceases, and plants typically respire like humans, absorbing oxygen and releasing carbon dioxide. A few plants – orchids, succulents and epiphytic bromeliads – do just the opposite, taking in carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen. Place these plants in bedrooms to refresh air during the night.

Releasing Water

As part of the photosynthetic and respiratory processes, plants release moisture vapour, which increases humidity of the air around them. Plants release roughly 97 percent of the water they take in. Place several plants together, and you can increase the humidity of a room, which helps keeps respiratory distresses at bay. Studies at the Agricultural University of Norway document that using plants in interior spaces decreases the incidence of dry skin, colds, sore throats and dry coughs.

Purifying Air

Plants remove toxins from air – up to 87 percent of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) every 24 hours, according to NASA research. VOCs include substances like formaldehyde (present in rugs, vinyl, cigarette smoke and grocery bags), benzene and trichloroethylene (both found in man-made fibres, inks, solvents and paint). Benzene is commonly found in high concentrations in study settings, where books and printed papers abound.

Modern climate-controlled, air-tight buildings trap VOCs inside. The NASA research discovered that plants purify that trapped air by pulling contaminants into soil, where root zone microorganisms convert VOCs into food for the plant.

Improving Health

Adding plants to hospital rooms speeds recovery rates of surgical patients, according to researchers at Kansas State University. Compared to patients in rooms without plants, patients in rooms with plants request less pain medication, have lower heart rates and blood pressure, experience less fatigue and anxiety, and are released from the hospital sooner.

The Dutch Product Board for Horticulture commissioned a workplace study that discovered that adding plants to office settings decreases fatigue, colds, headaches, coughs, sore throats and flu-like symptoms. In another study by the Agricultural University of Norway, sickness rates fell by more than 60 percent in offices with plants.

Sharpening Focus

A study at The Royal College of Agriculture in Circencester, found that students demonstrate 70 percent greater attentiveness when they’re taught in rooms containing plants. In the same study, attendance was also higher for lectures given in classrooms with plants.


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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 8:10 am 
South East AEC
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Pyro Tim wrote:
True that about lilys, but, cut the stamens out, and you can still have them with cats ;)


No its not, All parts of the lilly are poisonous to cats, you cut the stamens out when you use them in wedding bouquets, so the pollen does not stain the wedding dress. Tulips and daffodils also contain poison but generally are not found in packets of Felix.


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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 8:33 am 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
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Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2013 6:26 pm
Posts: 16935
Location: 54 Festive Road Winchcombe GLOUCS Yarp...
Which plants do you find in cat food then?

We have few house plants as they tend to die :facepalm: but a Garden full of shrubs and fruit and nut trees.


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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 9:16 am 
Karma Queen / Cake Meisterin
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Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2006 10:02 pm
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Location: North Yorkshire
TheGreenRabbit wrote:
You ask is there any point to house plants, the answer is a resounding yes, and here you go -

Breathing Easier

When you breathe, your body takes in oxygen and releases carbon dioxide. During photosynthesis, plants absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen. This opposite pattern of gas use makes plants and people natural partners. Adding plants to interior spaces can increase oxygen levels.

At night, photosynthesis ceases, and plants typically respire like humans, absorbing oxygen and releasing carbon dioxide. A few plants – orchids, succulents and epiphytic bromeliads – do just the opposite, taking in carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen. Place these plants in bedrooms to refresh air during the night.

Releasing Water

As part of the photosynthetic and respiratory processes, plants release moisture vapour, which increases humidity of the air around them. Plants release roughly 97 percent of the water they take in. Place several plants together, and you can increase the humidity of a room, which helps keeps respiratory distresses at bay. Studies at the Agricultural University of Norway document that using plants in interior spaces decreases the incidence of dry skin, colds, sore throats and dry coughs.

Purifying Air

Plants remove toxins from air – up to 87 percent of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) every 24 hours, according to NASA research. VOCs include substances like formaldehyde (present in rugs, vinyl, cigarette smoke and grocery bags), benzene and trichloroethylene (both found in man-made fibres, inks, solvents and paint). Benzene is commonly found in high concentrations in study settings, where books and printed papers abound.

Modern climate-controlled, air-tight buildings trap VOCs inside. The NASA research discovered that plants purify that trapped air by pulling contaminants into soil, where root zone microorganisms convert VOCs into food for the plant.

Improving Health

Adding plants to hospital rooms speeds recovery rates of surgical patients, according to researchers at Kansas State University. Compared to patients in rooms without plants, patients in rooms with plants request less pain medication, have lower heart rates and blood pressure, experience less fatigue and anxiety, and are released from the hospital sooner.

The Dutch Product Board for Horticulture commissioned a workplace study that discovered that adding plants to office settings decreases fatigue, colds, headaches, coughs, sore throats and flu-like symptoms. In another study by the Agricultural University of Norway, sickness rates fell by more than 60 percent in offices with plants.

Sharpening Focus

A study at The Royal College of Agriculture in Circencester, found that students demonstrate 70 percent greater attentiveness when they’re taught in rooms containing plants. In the same study, attendance was also higher for lectures given in classrooms with plants.


Wow! :shock: you have really made an extremely strong argument in favour of the humble house plant. Although they are still just a nuisance in this house. But I cannot argue with you, for the majority there're many benefits to be had from them.

Alison


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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 9:21 am 
Karma Queen / Cake Meisterin
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Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2006 10:02 pm
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Location: North Yorkshire
Andy R wrote:
As promised, a photo of the clivia in bloom.
My wife got it about thirty-five years ago and she tells me that it seemed quite old and established then.
Anyway, if we treat it properly it rewards us with flowers like this, once every year.
What's not to like?

I'd rather have plants in the house than bikes, any day. The only bike related task that I do in the house is wheel building.


I have to concede that is a magnificent bloom. As to bikes we have nowhere else to put them, they and their components are our ornaments at the moment, until someone fixes the roof on the shed :(

Alison


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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 11:12 am 
MacRetro rider
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Joined: Fri Feb 09, 2007 4:16 pm
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As regards health, during daylight due to photosynthesis plants do indeed convert CO2 to O2 but at night they dont just switch off, they use energy stores gained during day and give off CO2 again.
When I worked as a nurse we collected all the plants around the ward and moved them to the side room at night. You dont want patients with dodgy respiratory systems sleeping next to CO2 production systems.
If you have lots of plants, keep the air circulating by an opened window when you sleep at night especially if you have breathing problems.
Triffids may be fictional but maybe they're still out to get you :wink:


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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 11:39 am 
Karma Queen / Cake Meisterin
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Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2006 10:02 pm
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Location: North Yorkshire
velomaniac wrote:
As regards health, during daylight due to photosynthesis plants do indeed convert CO2 to O2 but at night they dont just switch off, they use energy stores gained during day and give off CO2 again.
When I worked as a nurse we collected all the plants around the ward and moved them to the side room at night. You dont want patients with dodgy respiratory systems sleeping next to CO2 production systems.
If you have lots of plants, keep the air circulating by an opened window when you sleep at night especially if you have breathing problems.
Triffids may be fictional but maybe they're still out to get you :wink:


I remember when I was 12 in the late 70's the removal of flowers at night from the wards, can't say I've noticed it being done these days, although I tend to only stay two to three days when I've stayed, even after c sections I've been gone in less than 48 hours despite the recommended 5 days.

Alison


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PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 1:26 am 
Gold Trader / MacRetro rider
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Joined: Sun May 25, 2008 11:03 am
Posts: 18215
Location: Sunny Glasgow
velomaniac wrote:
If house plants think then perchance they wonder whats the point of humans, imprisoning us indoor with inadequate water, food and light. People who like plants which are a form of living thing will feel a duty of care toward them. Your hubby now feels said duty and he cant murder them. I dont have houseplants because if they dont move and attract my attention like my cat I forget they're there plus of course the stupid cat would eat them and throw up everywhere :facepalm:



Ground control to Major Tom :shock: Back down to Earth Velo youre getting a bit lost in it there.


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