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 Post subject: Re: New Korean war ?
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:01 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Well the news is showing things, hotting up a bit inc china moving troops close to the border etc ............i think this is going to happen...........i haven't felt comfortable with irac or afgan etc...........but these nut cases in north korea need taking down before they actually do something stupid.........but as i said i think that is what china wants.........hell china are not moving troops to the north border to attack the north korean's are they now !


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 Post subject: Re: New Korean war ?
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:29 pm 
Gold Trader
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cant help thinking it would all calm down by itself if America just backed off, not much chance of that though


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 Post subject: Re: New Korean war ?
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:36 pm 
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lumos2000 wrote:
cant help thinking it would all calm down by itself if America just backed off, not much chance of that though



What's the US done then?


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 Post subject: Re: New Korean war ?
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:38 pm 
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greenstiles wrote:
but these nut cases in north korea need taking down before they actually do something stupid

Disagree. I don't think North Korea is going to do stupid things. It can't afford it, and if it comes to war it will lose... big time.

lumos2000 wrote:
cant help thinking it would all calm down by itself if America just backed off

Agree.


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 Post subject: Re: New Korean war ?
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:52 pm 
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Retro Cat wrote:
lumos2000 wrote:
cant help thinking it would all calm down by itself if America just backed off, not much chance of that though



What's the US done then?


err where shall I start ?


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 Post subject: Re: New Korean war ?
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 5:51 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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The US has not reacted unreasonably. Low key I would say.

Should all simmer down in a few weeks.


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 Post subject: Re: New Korean war ?
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 8:12 pm 
Retro Guru
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lumos2000 wrote:
Retro Cat wrote:
lumos2000 wrote:
cant help thinking it would all calm down by itself if America just backed off, not much chance of that though



What's the US done then?


err where shall I start ?


How have the US acted unreasonably in this scenario? Or is this more anti-American yawn?


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 Post subject: Re: New Korean war ?
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:25 pm 
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whats it got to do with them? its the other side of side of the world. they should sort out there own problems before playing world police. maybe if Truman had kept out of it in the first place korea would be in a different situation today, countries need to evolve by themselves. not have foreign ideals imposed on them by force.

please explane to me what good America are doing if not just antagonising the situation for there own means, or are you just jumping on the anti korea bandwagon

its not just some anti American yawn as you put it (anti war not anti American) :facepalm: , I wonder if the American people are happy to be sucked into another drawn out war with a possible nuclear outcome?


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 Post subject: Re: New Korean war ?
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:52 pm 
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lumos2000 wrote:
whats it got to do with them? its the other side of side of the world. they should sort out there own problems before playing world police. maybe if Truman had kept out of it in the first place korea would be in a different situation today, countries need to evolve by themselves. not have foreign ideals imposed on them by force.

please explane to me what good America are doing if not just antagonising the situation for there own means, or are you just jumping on the anti korea bandwagon

its not just some anti American yawn as you put it, I wonder if the American people are happy to be get sucked into another drawn out war with a possible nuclear outcome?


The timeline below shows how fond North Korea are at sabre rattling - indeed this scenario can be traced back to 2002. Now the US has acted in a reasonable manner in monitoring the situation and entering into dialogue with North Korea.

Now as you know empty vessels make the loudest din and I believe each side knows that starting a conflict would be extremely foolish but I do value what the US are doing in the absence of any other so called super-power in this situation.

2013

2 April: North Korea says it will restart its main Yongbyon nuclear complex, including a reactor mothballed in 2007.

30 March: North Korea says it is entering a "state of war" with South Korea, amid increasing tension in the peninsula.

27 March: North Korea cuts a key military hotline with South Korea, the last official direct link between the two.

19 March: The US flies B-52 nuclear-capable bombers over Korean peninsula, following several North Korean threats to attack US and South Korean targets.

15 March: North Korea accuses the US and its allies of attacks on its internet servers after some of its official websites become inaccessible.

11 March: The US begins annual joint military drills with South Korea. North Korea says it has scrapped the Korean War armistice, a pact with the UN says cannot be unilaterally scrapped.

7 March: The UN approves fresh sanctions on Pyongyang. North Korea says it has the right to a "pre-emptive nuclear strike" on the US.

12 February: North Korea has "successfully staged" a third underground nuclear test, state-run news agency KCNA says.

24 January: North Korea's National Defence Commission says it will proceed with a "high-level nuclear test".

22 January: UN Security Council passes resolution condemning North Korea's rocket launch and expands existing sanctions.

21 January: South Korea says the long-range rocket launched by North Korea in December was largely made using domestic technology.

2012

12 December: North Korea successfully puts a satellite into space, using a three-stage rocket. The test is condemned by the US and Pyongyang's neighbours as a banned test of long-range missile technology.

1 December: North Korea announces plans to test-fire a long-range rocket.

22 August: North Korea completes a ''major step'' by placing a dome on a light water reactor that could support its nuclear programme, an analyst says.

18 July: North Korean leader Kim Jong-un is given the title of marshal, state media announce.

17 July: North Korea appoints a new vice-marshal, Hyon Yong-chol, a day after the army chief, Ri Yong-ho, is removed from his post "due to illness".

9 June: North Korea says it has no plans to conduct a third nuclear test "at present", but hits out at what it says is provocation from South Korea.

16 April: UN Security Council condemns North Korea's failed rocket launch in a statement.

13 April: North Korea launches a long-range rocket, but it breaks up and crashes into the sea shortly after blast-off.

16 March: North Korea says it will launch a satellite mounted on a rocket to mark the 100th birthday of its late former President Kim Il-sung - a move that draws condemnation from Western nations and regional neighbours who say it will constitute a banned test of missile technology.

29 February: North Korea agrees to suspend uranium enrichment, as well as nuclear and long-range missile tests.

23 February: US and North Korean officials meet in Beijing, China, for talks on Pyongyang's nuclear programme - the first since the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong-il.

20 February: South Korea holds live-fire military drills near disputed sea borders with the North, despite threats of retaliation from Pyongyang.

20 January: Seoul says it will allow a private group to deliver 180 tonnes of flour to North Korea.

1 January: The Korean peninsula is at a "turning point" and there are opportunities for change, South Korean President Lee Myung-bak says in a New Year speech.

2011

31 December: Kim Jong-il's son, Kim Jong-un, is formally named supreme commander of the country's armed forces, state media say.

The move is seen as a clear sign that the young leader is fast consolidating power over North Korea.

19 December: State media announce that Kim Jong-il has died of heart attack, aged 69. Pyongyang's neighbours are on alert amid fears of instability and power struggle in the North.

30 November: The construction of an experimental light-water reactor and the production of low-enriched uranium are "progressing apace", an unnamed foreign ministry official in Pyongyang tells the KCNA state-run news agency.

25 October: The US and North Korea fail to reach a deal on restarting negotiations on the North's nuclear programme, after two days of talks in Geneva.

21 September: Nuclear envoys from the North and the South hold a rare meeting in Beijing. No details are given about the outcome.

24 August: North Korea's Kim Jong-il hold talks with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev in Siberia.

Mr Kim says he is ready to discuss ending nuclear tests if the talks on denuclearisation resume, Russia's media report.

1 August: Pyongyang says in a statement it is eager to resume the six-party talks "at an early date" and "without preconditions".

29 July: The US and North Korea hold "exploratory" talks in New York, aimed at gauging whether Pyongyang is serious about resuming the nuclear talks.

24 May: The US envoy for human rights in North Korea, Robert King, visits the North to assess the severity of its food shortages and whether Washington should resume its aid programme.

14 May: North Korea and Iran appear to have been exchanging ballistic missile technology in violation of sanctions, a leaked UN report shows.

1 March: South Korean President Lee Myung-bak urges the North to resume six-party nuclear talks and give up its nuclear programme.

28 February: US and South Korean troops stage major annual land, sea and air drills, prompting Pyongyang to threaten "all-out war" on the Korean peninsula.

20 January: South Korea agrees to high-level military talks with the North.

Seoul says it would join the talks only if the agenda includes the two events that have soured relations - the sinking of a southern warship last March, and the shelling of South Korea's island in November.

2010

6 December: South Korea begins major live-fire exercises off its coast despite warnings from the North.

23 November: North Korea shells South Korea's border island of Yeonpyeong, killing four people. The South returns fire.

12 November: A US nuclear scientist is given a tour by North Korean officials of an advanced uranium enrichment plant, and says he was "stunned" by its sophistication.

Senior officials in Washington, Tokyo and Seoul express concern.

30 August: US President Barack Obama imposes new financial sanctions on North Korea that will hit eight North Korean "entities" and four individuals, targeting the trade in arms, luxury goods and narcotics.

During his second visit to China this year, Kim Jong-il says he hopes for an "early resumption" of international talks on Pyongyang's nuclear programme, but gives no further details.

27 August: Former US President Jimmy Carter secures the release of an American citizen jailed in North Korea for eight years for illegally entering the country from China.

25 July: The US and South Korea stage a major military exercise in the Sea of Japan (East Sea) aimed at sending a message of deterrence to North Korea.

21 July: The US announces new sanctions on North Korea, following the crisis over the sinking of a South Korean warship, targeting Pyongyang's sale and purchase of arms and import of luxury goods.

28 May: A United Nations panel accuses North Korea of continuing to export nuclear and missile technology to Iran, Syria and Burma in defiance of a UN ban.

25 May: North Korea says it will cut all relations with South Korea and expel all South Korean workers from a jointly-run factory north of the border.

20 May: An international inquiry blames North Korea for sinking the Cheonan warship near the disputed inter-Korean maritime border. Pyongyang calls the claim a "fabrication".

26 March: A South Korean warship sinks killing 46 sailors, after an explosion caused by an alleged torpedo attack by the North. Pyongyang denies any involvement.

11 January: North Korea says it could return to talks on its nuclear disarmament in exchange for a peace treaty with the US and an end to sanctions.

2009

6 October: North Korea tells China it may be willing to return to six-party talks, if it sees progress in bilateral talks with the US.

5 August: Former US President Bill Clinton visits to help secure the release of two detained US journalists.

30 June: South Korea confirms that the North is going ahead with its threat to enrich uranium, which can be used to fuel a nuclear reactor, or be more highly-enriched for use in a nuclear weapon.

12 June: The UN Security Council votes unanimously to impose tougher sanctions on North Korea. Pyongyang responds by saying it will view any US-led attempt to blockade the country as an "act of war" and that it plans to "weaponise" its plutonium stocks and start enriching uranium.

27 May: North Korea says it will no longer guarantee the safety of US and South Korean vessels off its south-western coast and is no longer bound by the truce that ended the 1950-53 Korean War.

26 May: North Korea test-fires two short-range missiles hours after the UN Security Council condemns the nuclear test.

25 May: North Korea detonates an underground nuclear explosive device. This is North Korea's second nuclear test and is believed to be several times more powerful than the first one tested in 2006.

14 April: North Korea announces that it will pull out of the six-party talks and orders IAEA inspectors to leave the Yongbyon complex and the country in response to UN Security Council criticism of its recent rocket launch.

5 April: North Korea launches a rocket to international condemnation. It flies over Japan and lands in the Pacific Ocean. The launch is widely viewed as a pretext to test a type of missile capable of carrying a nuclear warhead.

24 February: North Korea announces that it is preparing to launch a satellite, Kwangmyongsong-2, from its north-eastern coast.

2008

10 December: Latest round of six-party talks ends without agreement on how to verify North Korea's account of its atomic activity.

11 October: The US says it has taken North Korea off its list of state sponsors of terrorism, after North Korea agrees to full verification of its nuclear sites.

9 October: The UN's nuclear watchdog, the IAEA, says North Korea has banned its inspectors from entering the Yongbyon nuclear complex.

24 September: IAEA says North Korea has removed seals preventing it using its main plant at Yongbyon. North Korean officials say UN inspectors will have no further access to the plant.

26 August: Two months after submitting its nuclear declaration, Pyongyang says it has stopped disabling its nuclear facilities in protest at the US failure to remove it from its list of state sponsors of terrorism.

24 July: The US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice meets her North Korean counterpart, Foreign Minister Pak Ui-chun, for informal talks at an Asean summit in Singapore - the first such meeting for four years. Ms Rice says the talks are "good", with no surprises.

27 June: North Korea demolishes the cooling tower at its Yongbyon nuclear reactor, in a symbol of its commitment to the talks on ending its nuclear programme.

26 June: After a delay of more than six months, the North hands over an account of its nuclear programme, enabling six-party negotiations to restart on 10 July.

13 May: North Korea hands over documents concerning its plutonium production programme.

25 April: The US accuses North Korea of helping Syria build a nuclear reactor that "was not intended for peaceful purposes"; US says it is concerned about Pyongyang's "proliferation activities".

8 April: US and North Korean negotiators hold more talks in Singapore; both say progress was made.

28 March: North Korea test-fires short-range missiles off its western coast.

26 February: The New York Philharmonic performs a groundbreaking concert in North Korea, seen as a major act of cultural diplomacy.

19 February: US and North Korean nuclear negotiators hold talks in Pyongyang, but no deal is reached.

31 January: North Korea has not changed its mind about ending its nuclear programme, Kim Jong-il reportedly says.

7 January: US nuclear envoy Christopher Hill call for patience towards North Korea and says that the US is ready to persevere with negotiations in order to secure a complete and correct declaration.

2007

31 December: North Korea fails to meet a deadline to disclose full details of its nuclear programme by the end of 2007.

6 December: US President George W Bush sends a letter to Kim Jong-il urging him to follow through on North Korea's pledge to reveal full details of its nuclear programme.

4 December: The top US envoy to North Korea, Christopher Hill, makes a rare visit for talks with the country's foreign minister. After visiting the Yongbyon facility, he says progress on disabling it is "going well".

6 November: US nuclear experts say they have made a "good start" disabling the reactor.

11 October: A team of nuclear experts arrives in North Korea to oversee the dismantling of reactors and other facilities.

3 October: Chinese officials say North Korea has agreed to disable its nuclear facilities at Yongbyon and give complete details of its nuclear programme by 31 December.

3 September: North Korea says Washington has agreed to take it off a list of countries that sponsor terrorism.

2 September: Following bilateral talks in Geneva, the US says Pyongyang has agreed to declare and disable all its nuclear facilities by the end of the year.

16 July: International inspectors confirm North Korea has shut down Yongbyon.

14 July: North Korea tells the US it has shut down its nuclear reactor after receiving the first shipments of heavy fuel oil. IAEA inspectors arrive for a monitoring visit to Yongbyon.

26 June: IAEA inspectors arrive in North Korea, the first time they have been allowed into the country since 2002.

21 June: US nuclear envoy Christopher Hill arrives for a surprise visit to Pyongyang.

14 April: North Korea misses the deadline to "shut down and seal" its Yongbyon nuclear reactor in exchange for energy aid, saying the banking row first needs to be resolved.

22 March: Six-party talks to discuss progress on the 13 February deal stumble after Pyongyang says it is unable to access its funds in a Macau bank.

15 March: The US ends an inquiry into the Macau-based Banco Delta Asia, paving the way for a block on North Korea's accounts, containing $25m (£13m), to be lifted.

13 March: Mohamed El Baradei goes to Pyongyang for talks. He says North Korea is "fully committed" to giving up its nuclear programme.

23 February: The head of the UN's nuclear agency, Mohamed ElBaradei, says he has been invited to North Korea for talks on its nuclear programme.

13 February: North Korea agrees to take the first steps towards nuclear disarmament, as part of a deal reached during talks.

8 February: Six-nation nuclear talks resume in Beijing.

9 January: Japan's PM Shinzo Abe tells the BBC his country cannot tolerate a nuclear-armed North Korea and calls for closer international co-operation to stop such an outcome.


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 Post subject: Re: New Korean war ?
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 10:10 pm 
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cant be botherd to read all that, im going on holiday and have bags to pack :D but from reading the first few lines its seem like America got there first and have been there done that and got the t-shirt. and your point is?


Last edited by lumos2000 on Thu Apr 04, 2013 10:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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