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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2012 12:19 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2009 2:12 pm
Posts: 3050
Location: Yateley, Hants.
dyna-ti wrote:
Have to ask as its relevant :)
OP.Do you ever clean you bike ? :lol: as in at the end of a ride or just leave it till the next time :?
Im not saying thats wholly the reason but ive got sram cassette and mine is fine.I spray water through using a plant sprayer so as not to cause any internal grease removal you can get if you pressure wash.I do this 90% of the time after riding,admittedly im more on road than off so there isnt the grinding paste issue but im convinced keeping it clean prolongs its life.


The picture was taken in the car park before I drove home.

9 times out of 10 it gets washed when I get home (and it's always cleaned with in a week and before it's ridden again), usually the pressure washer to remove lumps of mud from the frame, tyres and rims (never going near the bearings) and then a soft brush with soapy water to clean the rest and then a quick rinse with clean water and re-lubed with TF-2 spray afterwards.

The cassette was perfect when I left the carpark and that cog just collapsed when I changed up on the first climb.

Carl.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2012 7:28 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Mar 07, 2012 12:41 am
Posts: 816
What chainring You had selected at the moment of breakage?
Was that shifting done under heavy load?
Any chance of chain too short or rear mech wrongly adjusted?
I wonder what happened. Is metal on SRAM cassette so soft or You as strong.
:)
No offence, I'm just try to learn from other peoples mistakes instead of (so often)mine own. :oops:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2012 8:37 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Posts: 3050
Location: Yateley, Hants.
rider wrote:
What chainring You had selected at the moment of breakage?
Was that shifting done under heavy load?
Any chance of chain too short or rear mech wrongly adjusted?
I wonder what happened. Is metal on SRAM cassette so soft or You as strong.
:)
No offence, I'm just try to learn from other peoples mistakes instead of (so often)mine own. :oops:


Lower I think as I had just put the rear wheel in, never got into big ring all day as there were no big downhill sections.
Chain will do big crossover if needed but it's never done because it's not good. Gears are well set up and were shifting perfectly on the rest of the block.
I think the metal is too soft on this particular cassette, probably a manufacturing fault.

Carl.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2012 9:04 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Mar 07, 2012 12:41 am
Posts: 816
drcarlos wrote:

Lower I think as I had just put the rear wheel in, never got into big ring all day as there were no big downhill sections.
Chain will do big crossover if needed but it's never done because it's not good. Gears are well set up and were shifting perfectly on the rest of the block.
I think the metal is too soft on this particular cassette, probably a manufacturing fault.

Carl.


Bad luck!
Hope they change it under warranty. No real reason for it being much worse than low end Shimano on which I never seen anything like this (apart from accident damage or wrong setup was culprit), but it was 6 7/8 speed sprockets.
I found this site when searching for parts that was worn on mine bike.
Only to found they are retro now! :facepalm:
And mine bike is not even 20 years old yet. :lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:59 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
Posts: 8222
Location: New Forest, UK
highlandsflyer wrote:
Done thousands of miles touring on seven speed, and would put forward the argument it is still the hardiest balance.


I have to agree. Also the narrower cassette means a wheel with less dish, which is stronger. I'm still stuck on 7 speed for touring.

What really makes me laugh is that people are now going to 2x10 setups as they don't need all the ratios on 3x10...

2x10 seems suspiciously similar to 3x7. :lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 9:07 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2011 9:29 pm
Posts: 1877
Location: Somerset
shimano 10sp road chains are only good for 1000 miles, yes one thousand, and if not changed take rings & cassette out very quickly. I have to say it's too many gears, most of the time I have to change two gears to actually make any difference!!!

Common knowledge is to use 10sp KMC chains that last much much longer.

8sp for the win, 7sp is just hard to find good bits for.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 9:42 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Sat Oct 03, 2009 2:37 pm
Posts: 1728
Location: UK Southwest
Yep, should have stopped at 8. 8 speed shouldn't be any less durable than 7!!!

I think there would be a market for a quality high end tough 8 speed mtb groupset in this world of 10 and 11 speed BS.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 10:26 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 12:33 pm
Posts: 11108
Location: The Home Of Mountain Biking, And All Great Things.
Russell wrote:
Sometimes shit fails.

BITD, 7 speed stuff broke too.

Do we, as consumers, honestly expect 100% reliability in everything we buy?


Not like that.

Heavier gauge materials, stronger materials generally on seven speeds.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 10:27 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 12:33 pm
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Location: The Home Of Mountain Biking, And All Great Things.
gtRTSdh wrote:
shimano 10sp road chains are only good for 1000 miles, yes one thousand


1000 miles?

Wow, ten years riding for most of the lycra warriors!

:)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2012 10:33 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 12:33 pm
Posts: 11108
Location: The Home Of Mountain Biking, And All Great Things.
Russell wrote:
The only kit I've ever had fail on me has been due to crash damage, poor spanner work on my behalf, or plain old bad luck (bits of tree through rear mechs or rocks hitting the chainset and breaking the chain, that kind of thing).


You have been a very lucky rider.

Never had a dropout fail?

Nothing at all?

Incredible really.


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