Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Fri Dec 09, 2016 6:28 pm

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: track cycling questions
PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 12:57 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 2:59 pm
Posts: 2257
Location: Bridport Dorset
watching the track cycling last night and two things come to mind...

1 why do they use toe straps not clipless pedals?

2 do they all have to run the same gear ratios?

is it all in the rules that the bikes and riders are as they are or just what has been found to work best? i dont know but i bet someone here does!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 1:30 pm 
MacRetro rider
MacRetro rider
User avatar

Joined: Sat May 22, 2010 7:25 pm
Posts: 4977
Location: Edinburgh
MCsanandreas wrote:
watching the track cycling last night and two things come to mind...

1 why do they use toe straps not clipless pedals?



The sheer power these guys pull at the start would have them popping out of clipless.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 2:27 pm 
BoTM Winner / Gold Trader
BoTM Winner / Gold Trader
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 26, 2010 12:36 am
Posts: 4715
Location: Burlington, ON Canada
Tazio wrote:
MCsanandreas wrote:
watching the track cycling last night and two things come to mind...

1 why do they use toe straps not clipless pedals?



The sheer power these guys pull at the start would have them popping out of clipless.


+1

If you look close, a lot of them run double toe straps.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:42 pm 
Gold Trader
Gold Trader
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2007 11:19 pm
Posts: 7006
Location: Odense, Denmark
Some of them even run clipless WITH straps.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:54 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider

Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 12:32 pm
Posts: 331
Location: Northants
I think the power is only half of the problem. The pedals are much more likely to release as soon as things start twisting and bending as a result of the high forces, and the force is no longer applied directly upwards.

The UCI rules are quite restrictive over bicycle design and riding position, but they don't specify the gear ratio.

That was one of the noticeable compromises in the olympic pursuit races, some people started quickly and led for the first couple of laps, but then were under-geared and got caught up.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 6:58 pm 
MacRetro rider
MacRetro rider
User avatar

Joined: Sat May 22, 2010 7:25 pm
Posts: 4977
Location: Edinburgh
phill77 wrote:
I think the power is only half of the problem. The pedals are much more likely to release as soon as things start twisting and bending as a result of the high forces, and the force is no longer applied directly upwards.



But you have to admit the power is massive. Quote below from Chris Hoy.

“I can’t talk about everything we do in the lab for obvious reasons but we work on stuff to improve our leg speed, high cadence work. Once a week I go in and work on an orgometer[check] set up in the lab which has a massive flywheel attached to a bike which is about 12feet long.
It has two sets of chains to make the gear even bigger. When you push down on the pedal you’d think the break was on because it just doesn’t move. They use that to measure the torque you are producing. The instantaneous torque we generate from pressing the pedal is nearly 700 newton-metres.
A Ferrari would produced 400 to 500 newton-metres (obviously they can maintain it) but for a split second we are generating a greater force through those cranks. That is what we are trying to improve, that ability to apply force quickly. You are trying to apply a force at as higher speed as possible."

And he produces way over 2000w of power on a sprint.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 8:23 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sat Aug 13, 2005 2:59 pm
Posts: 2257
Location: Bridport Dorset
cheers for the answers folks!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 23, 2012 11:21 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 08, 2008 4:18 pm
Posts: 2336
Us ordinary mortals can get away with normal clipless pedals (although I wind the tension way up on mine). Gearing is chosen for the particular event, the track and personal preference/riding style -- some tracks are shorter than others and need a lower gear. I think Hoy's on 50/14 or 52/14 depending on the event, probably bigger for the keirin.

For comparison, I use 49/16 (although I ride on a very short track, and have legs like pipe cleaners ;) )


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 12:01 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2012 11:06 pm
Posts: 460
Some of the chainrings are like dinner plates :shock:

Regards


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 10:15 am 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 08, 2008 4:18 pm
Posts: 2336
I think they look bigger than they are because they tend to use solid rings for stiffness, rather than normal spidered/cutaway ones. Generally the rings are no bigger than a normal road bike outer chainring.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], kvs766, M-Power, pigman and 22 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group