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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 8:56 am 
Classified Mod
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Joined: Wed Dec 30, 2009 8:34 pm
Posts: 14043
Location: Fife in Scotland
I think most of the riders in long distance winter MTB races like Rovaniemi use Pogies > https://www.runultra.co.uk/Events/Rovan ... inter-Race

And Iditasport > https://www.bicycling.com/rides/adventu ... sport-100k


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 9:37 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2011 10:51 am
Posts: 448
Location: Bolton
Last winter I generally wore a pair of wool gloves covered by a pair of huge winter motorcycle gloves, and even that didn't stop the circulation from cutting off!

The pogies are like a big sleeping bag for your hands eg, they 'retain the warmth from your hands' and stay warm. Whereas my hands aren't ever warm to begin with!! They go totally white, devoid of any blood in them.

I don't personally think any fabric medium alone will stop my issue. Hence I want to try something solid to keep the wind off.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 9:58 am 
Devout Dirtbag
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Joined: Tue Sep 24, 2013 6:51 pm
Posts: 121
HAND WARMERS?

I use theses under the bridge of my feet ... not red hot but you can feel them, maybe place them between gloves and the back of your hand. :wink:


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 12:30 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2011 10:51 am
Posts: 448
Location: Bolton
Dragging up an old thread, however a quick update from me as winter draws near once more.

I bought some of these special Raynauds gloves which have silver in them for heat conductivity; https://www.raynaudsdisease.com/raynaud ... loves.html, and they seem to be working very well under another pair of gloves so far. I know that it's still been quite mild recently, but where the circulation would usually be completely cut off to my hands previously, they have been warm when I arrive at my destination.

Hopefully these are going to help me in the proper cold months. We will see.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 3:05 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:42 am
Posts: 3149
You tried chucking a handwarmer in a pogie? I know a couple of guys in our club do that. Get half a dozen of those rechargeable (either chemical or electrical) ones and then they can top up half way through the ride, or before the commute home. (and it gets *really* cold here. I've started a night ride at below -15.

And i saw a pair of battery powered heated gloves a couple of weeks ago, will see if i can find them again.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 3:36 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2011 10:51 am
Posts: 448
Location: Bolton
I've seen the battery powered heated gloves yes, but a decent pair are pretty serious money! I would also prefer a more slightly organic solution.

Handwarmers in pogies sounds like a good idea, I think I may try that next if my "special" gloves don't work.

I actually don't really mind having hands that are cold (ish). But there is a difference between cold and literally no blood circulation in my fingers whatsoever! (and when they start to thaw out it can be absolute agony!!)


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 4:04 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Tue Aug 21, 2018 3:43 pm
Posts: 257
Location: Cambridgeshire - flatlands (the horror, the horror)
I have spend many hours (days) at crazy low temp on mountains. I have spent many hours with my feet clipped into pedals despite no longer feeling that I have any feet at all. So......what’s the remedy?

I suffer from mild Reynauld’s and certainly from bad blood flow due to frostbite damage. So I have to take careful action.

The key thing in my view is not to say ‘my hands are cold so I need to make my hands warm’. That’s not right in terms of physiology really...what you want this to get the blood into your extremities. It is restricted by unsuitable bends in the body - at the ankle, at the wrist, and by restrictions such as over-tight shoes - the blood to the foot is carried over the arch in the main, and a restriction here can create real problems. But blood flow will be restricted by the body when it thinks ‘it’s cold outside’ and interestingly can reduce blood flow to hands and feet if your core is cold and your extremities are warm. The big thing is to get the core temp up, and then the blood flow really gets to the extremities. Before investing in hand warmers, get the angles right for your wrists, make sure the blood flow to your feet is not restricted, and really get your core temp up. This means layers, including merino wool, but with long zip which allow venting, to stop perspiration building up - that’s a real killer, chilling will occur really quickly. Idea is: temp up, sweat whicked away from the body. Job done.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 4:44 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2011 10:51 am
Posts: 448
Location: Bolton
@ 2manyoranges

Thanks, yes totally agree with that, some of which I am aware of, but some is new to me.

It's a funny old syndrome, and is very much related to the nervous system. I've had it occur in the middle of August when I was about to do my best-man's speech (a hot and sunny day).

I've been putting the gloves on straight off the radiator (warm) so that by the time the wind-chill has cooled them down, my core temperature is on the rise (as I will have cycled a mile or so). Working so far but will see when it's freezing.

I've found that even if I start to cool down, maybe after a pit-stop, I rarely get a 2nd attack if I have warmed up properly on the initial ride out.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2018 6:21 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:42 am
Posts: 3149
Yes, they aren't cheap, but they have got a lot less expensive. We first started looking ~10 years ago when we moved to Sweden as my wife really suffered with cold hands and feet. Would have been near enough £600 for heated insoles and gloves, and they were massive, cumbersome and short battery life (60-90 minutes). They are now near enough £200 for both hands and feet, far smaller, and less cumbersome and batteries will do 3-4 hours (and are half the size/weight).

Try www.bucken.se

Oh yeah, we fixed the wife's problem. She was wearing far too much and restricting blood flow. (i did suggest that might be the cause several times, but was disagreed with, so another extra layer was added, and it got worse. :/ )


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