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PostPosted: Sat Jun 08, 2013 8:32 am 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 8:44 pm
Posts: 3584
Location: Wherever it is, I'm being just that little bit more Lance
Iwasgoodonce wrote:
Watch out for them chillies!


I'm not stupid enough to eat them :lol:

I give them to chilli heads I know who claim they can eat anything, turns out most of them can't.

I make chilli oil out of them too, add a tea spoon when making roast potatoes, yum!


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 3:05 pm 
rBoTM Winner
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Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2008 11:54 am
Posts: 1059
Location: Derby
Sweet corn.
Durning the first 3 years of 5 on the plot so to speak, the Missus & I had good success with growing sweet corn . How ever the last 2 summers which as you all know have been very wet and not very warm.Hence little or no crop.
Apart from the weather anyone any tips.The plants we have set are not coming on very well :?:
Watering x3 weekly at present.Is this enough .Good soaking each time.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 3:31 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 7:18 pm
Posts: 3798
Location: Staffordshire
bagpuss wrote:
Sweet corn.
Durning the first 3 years of 5 on the plot so to speak, the Missus & I had good success with growing sweet corn . How ever the last 2 summers which as you all know have been very wet and not very warm.Hence little or no crop.
Apart from the weather anyone any tips.The plants we have set are not coming on very well :?:
Watering x3 weekly at present.Is this enough .Good soaking each time.


Corn has a very shallow root system. So keep up with the watering and occasionally add a liquid feed to the water as the corn uses all the shallow nutrients.

We have a saying, "How do you know when your corn is ready to harvest?"

"When the squirrels eat it all."

Edit: Did you grow them in pots and then plant out? Most in the UK do. I have read that the best way to do this is in individual cells. If you plant a few seeds in a pot, and they all grow, the roots will be well entwined. Corn hates having its roots interfered with.

I didn't have time to plant any of my own thanks to the cold spring so have bought some. I had to take the root ball apart and they have been sulking ever since. Past experience tells me that they will get going in good time.

If you plant your own, use individual cells next time.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 6:49 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 7:08 pm
Posts: 1248
Location: I know where the stash is – the secret's safe with me. The flying squad will never find us...
Our hens love to peck at a corn cob, keeps em happy for ages. Last year's crop didn't do well because of a poor summer, so the resulting small cobs were used as chicken treats.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 10:26 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 06, 2010 9:20 pm
Posts: 1087
Location: Chained to the mash tun.
Sweetcorn in and watered today. Dad spent the day there and i rocked up after work to claim all the glory :lol: I took some great photos and then realised that the memory card wasn't in :facepalm: I'll take some more tomorrow. Found a great seed catalogue, i'll post a link tomorrow as well. All old veggies and cross pollinated so you can save the seeds.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 12:48 am 
Dirt Disciple
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Joined: Fri May 20, 2011 4:54 pm
Posts: 33
Location: Deepest Darkest Warwickshire
Mayflies by Richard Wilbur

It was no muddled swarm I witnessed, for
In entrechats each fluttering insect there
Rose two steep yards in air,
Then slowly floated down to climb once more,
So that they all composed a manifold
And figured scene,
And seemed the weavers of some cloth of gold,
Or the fine pistons of some bright machine.

The whole thing is here: http://www.ablemuse.com/erato/showthread.php?t=413 but I just like the pistons of the bright machine.

K


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 10:56 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 7:08 pm
Posts: 1248
Location: I know where the stash is – the secret's safe with me. The flying squad will never find us...
grumpycommuter wrote:
Sweetcorn in and watered today. Dad spent the day there and i rocked up after work to claim all the glory :lol: I took some great photos and then realised that the memory card wasn't in :facepalm: I'll take some more tomorrow. Found a great seed catalogue, i'll post a link tomorrow as well. All old veggies and cross pollinated so you can save the seeds.


Looking forward to the great photos....


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 11:05 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 7:18 pm
Posts: 3798
Location: Staffordshire
What can I say? Thanks for all the mayfly poems. I am not a poetry fan, although I love books and literature. The two mayfly poems I really like though. I may even look up some of the authors' other works!

To celebrate the mayflies' all too short lives, I have tied a couple of the fishing variety. I made them up rather that look at a book of fly patterns and I'll try them at the weekend if the weather is suitable.

So far you have seen one of our plots. I'll try and get a couple of pictures of the other one now that everything apart from gherkins have been planted.

Everything is in now so it'll be a case of weeding and picking hopefully. Anyone want some runner beans in a few weeks?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 5:48 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 01, 2009 2:49 pm
Posts: 2578
Location: Boiling in a Bivvy Bag
What a great thread! Your plot looks fantastic, Iwasgoodonce.
I used to love growing most my own veg but sadly have been too ill for the last few years, though I did manage a hundred or so leeks a year ago. They had to cope without any watering at all bless 'em, other than when they were first planted out and once again during the driest period. I didn't fancy their chances at all (nor did anyone else), but after hardly growing and just about hanging on for most of the summer, they came to life when the rain came in August and actually managed to catch up with every one elses pampered ones.
All in all the 'no water' experiment was a resounding success really - seems if you treat their roots mean when they're young, you keep 'em keen. :)

Hopefully I'll be able to do a bit more next year, the farmer next door's offered a patch of land, though the Dock's and Couch are mocking any intentions at the mo'
Soo miss me homegrown kale and tom's and spuds and, and... :(


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:39 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Thu Jul 19, 2007 7:18 pm
Posts: 3798
Location: Staffordshire
ferrus wrote:
What a great thread! Your plot looks fantastic, Iwasgoodonce.
I used to love growing most my own veg but sadly have been too ill for the last few years, though I did manage a hundred or so leeks a year ago. They had to cope without any watering at all bless 'em, other than when they were first planted out and once again during the driest period. I didn't fancy their chances at all (nor did anyone else), but after hardly growing and just about hanging on for most of the summer, they came to life when the rain came in August and actually managed to catch up with every one elses pampered ones.
All in all the 'no water' experiment was a resounding success really - seems if you treat their roots mean when they're young, you keep 'em keen. :)

Hopefully I'll be able to do a bit more next year, the farmer next door's offered a patch of land, though the Dock's and Couch are mocking any intentions at the mo'
Soo miss me homegrown kale and tom's and spuds and, and... :(


Hope you're well enough to get back to it soon, ferrus. I'm not going to get any kale this winter either now. Bloody pigeons have had the lot!

The potatoes are flowering now so I'll have a look in a couple of weeks. Gherkins are in although the slugs have had a couple of the squash plants. I didn't put any pellets down as we had seen a big old toad on the plot and we didn't want to poison him. The very least he could have done was eat the slugs. Perhaps he did, he just waited for them to be 'squash stuffed!'

Did anyone else's broad beans get battered by the unseasonable winds last weekend?


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