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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 11:43 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 11:25 pm
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Location: North Herts
Stunning 8)


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 3:10 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 3:12 pm
Posts: 3911
Location: The Shire
I think I've just found my new favourite bike! :shock:

Stunning, I love the brazed detail under the lacquer....beautiful.

Oh, and welcome! :wink: :D


Last edited by cherrybomb on Mon Nov 10, 2008 11:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 7:15 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2006 8:50 pm
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Location: RUGBY
Very,very beautiful! You just can't beat a bit of steel!
Thanx Max


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 7:51 pm 
retrobike rider
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Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2007 11:22 pm
Posts: 7306
Location: Hove
That's superb, and a very tasteful build too.

I believe Reynolds 653 is very similar in its dynamic characteristics to 853, isn't it? But Reynolds had to develop 853 because 653 can't be TIG-welded, as it can only withstand the lower temperatures involved with brazing. I must say I'm surprised the bike is so light, but the tubes look very skinny, perhaps all of them 28.6. And as others have said, the confidence to show off the brazing under the clear powdercoat is a very nice touch indeed.

I think it's also very clever for a hand builder to be able to design a full-suspension frame so well, but to be realistic I guess the design must have been preempted to a large extent by adopting the AMP rear end, mustn't it? The AMP must surely dictate that the pivot point be exactly where it is, which would take some of the more difficult theorising out of the equation. But even so, it's impressive for any year, let alone as early as 1993.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 8:10 pm 
Gold Trader
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Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2008 3:12 pm
Posts: 8433
Location: Oh Canada!
cjax wrote:
That's fillet brazing not welding.

Love the way he's laquered over the bare steel, looks really neat :wink:

Chris.


'scuse my ignorance, how does fillet brazing work?


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 8:17 pm 
Retro Guru
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8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)

Saw this on VRC too. Loved it then, love it now, this has to be one of the most beautiful machines on the planet.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 9:19 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Tue Apr 17, 2007 4:50 pm
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Location: Yorkshuh
This takes jealousy to a whole new level...

Hand made for you :shock:
Still looks brand new :shock:
Family built :shock:

Makes my interest in Retrobikes seem completely insignificant...

As close to absolute zero as I have seen 8)


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 9:29 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 8:44 pm
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Location: Wherever it is, I'm being just that little bit more Lance
Brazed steel - that's how a bike should be built! The fillets look gorgeous, a real work of art, congratulations!


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 6:11 am 
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Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2008 8:45 pm
Posts: 8
Location: SoCal US
Thanks, everyone, for the kind words and the warm welcome.

For those unfamiliar with fillet brazing (though I'm certainly no expert): Unlike Tungsten Inert Gas arc-welding, which actually melts the tube material at around 2000 degrees F. in order to fuse the tubes together, brazing uses brass (or occasionally silver) - which has a lower melting point than the steel tubes - as a metal filler to 'glue' the tubes together.

The tubes are heated to the melting point of the brass filler (1600 degrees F.) and the brass flows onto the tubing, diffusing into the steel to form a metallurgical bond. The same process is called soldering when working with low temperature fillers like lead or tin.

A fillet brazed frame will be around 4 oz. heavier than a welded one but, IME, they tend to be damn strong, even with stupid-thin steel.

Before filing and sanding (a critical stage; any filing mistakes can create stress risers in the steel tube):
Image

After:
Image

Bead-blasted and clear-coated:
Image


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 10:55 pm 
Retro Guru
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Posts: 807
Location: hiding under the bed
fantastic. ive got a few curtis frames from the uk www.curtisbikes.co.uk gary brazes frames together usually from t45, but he doesnt file the frames, he is a master at making the brass look like tig welds, very impressive stuff. he is also a fan of clearcoat on a blasted frame.


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