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 Post subject: Disc brake dilemma
PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 2:09 pm 
Devout Dirtbag

Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2012 8:06 pm
Posts: 123
Location: Dorset
Hi
I am having problems with the brakes on my bike its more modern than i am allowed to say but i think you all may be clued up to know the answer !
I have changed the front and back pads but now i have a gratey sound from the front and i am not sure if thats due to the brakes needing bedding in ? On the back i now have the back wheel sticking a bit, On the back i pushed the pistons back and they went back fine i think and i have re centralized the the brake caliper but no difference.
The bike has tektro draco front caliper and the back is hayes stroker ryde.


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 Post subject: Discs
PostPosted: Sun Dec 23, 2012 6:11 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2007 12:15 am
Posts: 7563
Location: North Yorkshire
Problems with disc brakes after they are a few rides old, is the most common mechanical problem on MTBs. They are just so unreliable (And heavy) The only set that were ever any good, were the original Hope C2's that were a closed system.
My only advice is to stick with either Canti's or V brakes, lighter, easier to set up, reliable and it teaches you to ride a line properly and keep off the brakes.
Most race frames still come fitted with V brake bosses for this reason and why between 25 and 50 percent of most starters at Mtb races steer well clear of discs. Drag is a real problem and has never really been addressed by any of the manufacturers succussfully.
Hope this helps? :oops:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 23, 2012 6:58 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider

Joined: Thu Apr 17, 2008 1:24 am
Posts: 7563
Location: Manchester
I'm no expert on discs, but when trying to align them I undo the caliper bolts then squeeze the lever repeatedly, then pull the lever as hard as I can and do up the bolts while still pulling the lever. This seems to work for me.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 23, 2012 7:58 pm 
Devout Dirtbag

Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 3:35 am
Posts: 115
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
If you're getting that grating sound from the front when the lever is released, try doing the same as you've done with the rear. Use the flat blade of a screwdriver against the pads to lever the pistons back in. Then try the brake again and adjust the caliper if necessary.

If the sound is happening when applying the brake, it could just be the nature of the rotor drilling or slot pattern and your pads.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2012 12:47 am 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Sun Sep 05, 2010 1:10 am
Posts: 4756
Location: Heathfield, East Sussex
Rampage wrote:
I'm no expert on discs, but when trying to align them I undo the caliper bolts then squeeze the lever repeatedly, then pull the lever as hard as I can and do up the bolts while still pulling the lever. This seems to work for me.


This... 8)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 24, 2012 8:35 am 
Devout Dirtbag

Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2012 8:06 pm
Posts: 123
Location: Dorset
I have done the undoing of the caliper mount to adj the caliper it improved things but still not great :( I think its off to a bike shop in the new year for a service, at least i have the back up of my old Cinder cone V brakes are less trouble some !! Just need to sort the puncture in the un punctureable inner tube on that :?


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 Post subject: Re: Discs
PostPosted: Tue Dec 25, 2012 12:16 am 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2007 7:21 am
Posts: 794
Location: Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Wold Ranger wrote:
Problems with disc brakes after they are a few rides old, is the most common mechanical problem on MTBs. They are just so unreliable (And heavy) The only set that were ever any good, were the original Hope C2's that were a closed system.
My only advice is to stick with either Canti's or V brakes, lighter, easier to set up, reliable and it teaches you to ride a line properly and keep off the brakes.
Most race frames still come fitted with V brake bosses for this reason and why between 25 and 50 percent of most starters at Mtb races steer well clear of discs. Drag is a real problem and has never really been addressed by any of the manufacturers succussfully.
Hope this helps? :oops:


How does that textbook retrogrouching help? Clearly you've never ridden a decent disc brake if a crusty old C2 is 'the only set that were ever good'!
Unless this post has magically come across the web from 2001, you need to update your experience a bit before you start dispensing advice.


Anyway, it would be really helpful if we could know what brake the issue is with. I'm going to predict its an Avid, which have significant issues with the pistons seizing due to rubbish sealing and poor tolerances. If not, we'll work it out.


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 Post subject: Re: Discs
PostPosted: Tue Dec 25, 2012 5:29 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2007 12:15 am
Posts: 7563
Location: North Yorkshire
shogun wrote:
Wold Ranger wrote:
Problems with disc brakes after they are a few rides old, is the most common mechanical problem on MTBs. They are just so unreliable (And heavy) The only set that were ever any good, were the original Hope C2's that were a closed system.
My only advice is to stick with either Canti's or V brakes, lighter, easier to set up, reliable and it teaches you to ride a line properly and keep off the brakes.
Most race frames still come fitted with V brake bosses for this reason and why between 25 and 50 percent of most starters at Mtb races steer well clear of discs. Drag is a real problem and has never really been addressed by any of the manufacturers succussfully.
Hope this helps? :oops:


How does that textbook retrogrouching help? Clearly you've never ridden a decent disc brake if a crusty old C2 is 'the only set that were ever good'!
Unless this post has magically come across the web from 2001, you need to update your experience a bit before you start dispensing advice.


Anyway, it would be really helpful if we could know what brake the issue is with. I'm going to predict its an Avid, which have significant issues with the pistons seizing due to rubbish sealing and poor tolerances. If not, we'll work it out.



Had just about everything, right up to present day, and they are all as bad, it's the modern open systems that are the problem, no vaccum from the lever to pull the pistons back in and grunge finds it's way inside very soon and they drag.
Avids are rated as one of the better, but are still very poor. I would say Shimano are the most reliable, but piston retraction is still an issue, with the dreaded rotor drag.
Advice Huh? :D All the bikes I service and the No 1 fault i with modern Mtb's is Disc brake drag. We also get a lot more Mud and rain here than most other countries! BTW :cry:
Also He clearly states Tektro front and Hayes Stroker rear, no mention of Avids at all. :roll:


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 Post subject: Re: Discs
PostPosted: Tue Dec 25, 2012 6:15 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Fri May 01, 2009 7:11 pm
Posts: 8479
Location: Fircombe.
Wold Ranger wrote:
shogun wrote:
Wold Ranger wrote:
Problems with disc brakes after they are a few rides old, is the most common mechanical problem on MTBs. They are just so unreliable (And heavy) The only set that were ever any good, were the original Hope C2's that were a closed system.
My only advice is to stick with either Canti's or V brakes, lighter, easier to set up, reliable and it teaches you to ride a line properly and keep off the brakes.
Most race frames still come fitted with V brake bosses for this reason and why between 25 and 50 percent of most starters at Mtb races steer well clear of discs. Drag is a real problem and has never really been addressed by any of the manufacturers succussfully.
Hope this helps? :oops:


How does that textbook retrogrouching help? Clearly you've never ridden a decent disc brake if a crusty old C2 is 'the only set that were ever good'!
Unless this post has magically come across the web from 2001, you need to update your experience a bit before you start dispensing advice.


Anyway, it would be really helpful if we could know what brake the issue is with. I'm going to predict its an Avid, which have significant issues with the pistons seizing due to rubbish sealing and poor tolerances. If not, we'll work it out.



Had just about everything, right up to present day, and they are all as bad, it's the modern open systems that are the problem, no vaccum from the lever to pull the pistons back in and grunge finds it's way inside very soon and they drag.
Avids are rated as one of the better, but are still very poor. I would say Shimano are the most reliable, but piston retraction is still an issue, with the dreaded rotor drag.
Advice Huh? :D All the bikes I service and the No 1 fault i with modern Mtb's is Disc brake drag. We also get a lot more Mud and rain here than most other countries! BTW :cry:
Also He clearly states Tektro front and Hayes Stroker rear, no mention of Avids at all. :roll:


You must be doing something very wrong then.
One set of Shimano and a set of Martas here and no brake drag at all in the dry, and minimal in the filth until the lever is given a squeeze to clear the pads; it's certainly much less than any rim brakes I've ever used...
Cantis are the answer? :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: Discs
PostPosted: Tue Dec 25, 2012 8:19 pm 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner
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Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2011 2:35 pm
Posts: 2785
suburbanreuban wrote:
Cantis are the answer? :lol: [/i]


Nah, rod pull rim brake with leather pads :roll:


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