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PostPosted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 12:53 am 
retrobike rider
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weeman_mtb wrote:
Nice attention to detail with the writing on the hub lining up with the valve, a sign of a confident wheel builder (so I've read :oops: ).


Makes sense! first wheel I built I was so confused I had no care with such things

I was so chuffed when I had done it though and it saved me £90 on the quote I had from a competent and decent LBS

Got my spokes £30 cheaper on t'interweb and saved £60 for labour

- Been told these are good prices, so wheel building is a skill worth aquiring :D

But now I know how much the hub will rotate when all the spokes are in, which you only get from having built a few wheels, so I tried to convey that as a rough calculation

I'm really happy I can build good strong true wheels!


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 10:12 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 5:16 pm
Posts: 200
Great write up on the wheel building hydorah :D just built my first wheel over Xmas, i'm not the fastest at doing then but I have to say I enjoyed doing it so much & did it the way your write explains. I love the look of the blue spoke nipple 8) i'm going to do the same (different colour) when i've got the funds


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 11:03 pm 
retrobike rider
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sweety wrote:
Great write up on the wheel building hydorah :D just built my first wheel over Xmas, i'm not the fastest at doing then but I have to say I enjoyed doing it so much & did it the way your write explains. I love the look of the blue spoke nipple 8) i'm going to do the same (different colour) when i've got the funds


That's brilliant, well done sweety

You have field tested the write up and it worked out!!!

My first pair took 3 hours, but this pair? about half hour for the rear, front isn't done yet! Grrr


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 Post subject: Wheels done!
PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 11:48 am 
retrobike rider
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After my wheel building escapades the time has come to finish them off

This involves trueing them up and replacing the freehub body

I trued them up first as it's not a good idea to attempt to unscrew a freehub from an unbuilt wheel with out a tyre on

In the tried and true style of this build I though I'd explore an alternative to trueing stands and dishing sticks

We've all straightened wheels on bikes, so I tough why not true a new wheel on a bike, alignment, centering will be easy but could do with a bit of precision... And what about vertical alignment...

This is my answer:

My trusty Univega is now a trueing station!

Image

And the rear:

Image

The brake blocks served as feelers for lateral truing and the steel rule as the feelers for vertical trueing and the scale was handy for alignment but to be honest it was obvious from the wheel being centred in the frame/fork

It was a geat plan, the only downside being there is a bit of bike in your way here and there!

Next job...

I want to run 11 tooth top gear on the rear and a 50t up front so the old freehub body had to be switched, you can't get an 11t cassette to mount securely

Original body was so old it had threads on it! (for uniglide compatability)

The real problem is the splines go all the way to the end, you need the spines to stop about 1mm from the end of the body to accomodate an 11t cog - Had one on another wheel

Here's the bad body:

Image

Freehub body removal is simply a case of removing the axle and sliding a 10mm allen key into the vacant hole, the freehub is held in by a hollow bolt which you can simply unscrew

It has normal threads (couter clockwise, to unscrew)

Removal:

Image

New cassette fitted:

Image

I got these sexy skewers from user "GaryTurner" on here too:

Currency converted price about £20, they are TEC titanium skewers they are sexy... I couldn't help it

Image

I almost bought X-Lite blue bar ends, but why fit stuff you don't need? And I'm trying to keep the cost of this build low

When I'm finished I'll post the specs ~ and the costings


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 12:28 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Sun Jun 27, 2010 9:37 am
Posts: 3976
nice work chap. the only prob with using a bike as a truing jig is that you are assuming the frame and forks are true in the first place. not a prob if you use the frame and forks the wheels are intended for. a proper jig and dish bar give a true result. conversely this may not be perfect for a misaligned set of forks or frame :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 12:53 pm 
retrobike rider
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jamabikes wrote:
nice work chap. the only prob with using a bike as a truing jig is that you are assuming the frame and forks are true in the first place. not a prob if you use the frame and forks the wheels are intended for. a proper jig and dish bar give a true result. conversely this may not be perfect for a misaligned set of forks or frame :lol:


Of course!

I'm just trying to be illustrative of the alternatives to specialist equipment, basically a trueing stand is by no means essential

And a good few trueing stands I've seen are far too flimsy to be relied upon, you can nudge the forks from side to side...

Last set of wheels I built, I built a dishing stick out of wood, then trued on the Univega frame and fork

Subsquently reused the wood in a woodworking project, so this time I tough I'd do something different

I used my daily rider and as I say I have seen how positively centred wheels sit in this frame, so I'm happy, but I'll do a quick check when they are in the project bike frame - Not a bad idea at all

Thanks for the input


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 1:11 pm 
retrobike rider
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hydorah wrote:
jamabikes wrote:
nice work chap. the only prob with using a bike as a truing jig is that you are assuming the frame and forks are true in the first place. not a prob if you use the frame and forks the wheels are intended for. a proper jig and dish bar give a true result. conversely this may not be perfect for a misaligned set of forks or frame :lol:


Of course!

I'm just trying to be illustrative of the alternatives to specialist equipment, basically a trueing stand is by no means essential

And a good few trueing stands I've seen are far too flimsy to be relied upon, you can nudge the forks from side to side...

Last set of wheels I built, I built a dishing stick out of wood, then trued on the Univega frame and fork

Subsquently reused the wood in a woodworking project, so this time I tough I'd do something different

I used my daily rider and as I say I have seen how positively centred wheels sit in this frame, so I'm happy, but I'll do a quick check when they are in the project bike frame - Not a bad idea at all

Thanks for the input


One thing we both forgot to mention: spoke tension!

You can buy spoke tensiometers...

Or you can true the wheel then grapple the crossed spokes around tweaking up any if they don't feel right and recheck the wheel

You can guess what I did :D


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 1:34 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Sun Jun 27, 2010 9:37 am
Posts: 3976
a lot of wheel builders, my self included, gently 'ting' a spoke tool on each spoke and make sure they sound the same. no good if you are tone deaf though :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 8:04 pm 
retrobike rider
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jamabikes wrote:
a lot of wheel builders, my self included, gently 'ting' a spoke tool on each spoke and make sure they sound the same. no good if you are tone deaf though :lol:


Awesome! I had to experiment with this!

Drive side rear A, Non drive rear side A#, front both sides G#

Sort of suspected these results the spokes have three different free lengths and the rear has unequal tension on each side due to dishing, but spokes are consistent to those with the same job

So it bloody works ~ tinging spokes is another good test, of at least even tension

As good as a tensiometer as long as you know or can find out what pitch you are aiming for...

http://www.bikexprt.com/bicycle/tension.htm Has some info but is a bit old!

And then you would need some means of generating reference pitches...

Which I guess starts becoming specialised again

I'm glad you commented, this is all very cool stuff


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 9:57 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Fri Jul 23, 2010 5:16 pm
Posts: 200
Another good write up :D Was starting to wonder how the build was going as you had been a bit quiet but then thought your prob still polishing away :lol: :lol:


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