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PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 7:53 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2015 8:11 pm
Posts: 93
Location: Telford, Shropshire
Hi everyone, returning to cycling after 35 years.

I have a saddle on my bike, which is as hard as a rock. I need a comfy saddle so I can get some miles in my legs. Condition not as important as comfort, so if anyone has got a saddle gathering cobwebs, give me a shout guys


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:27 pm 
Gold Trader
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Joined: Mon Jan 15, 2007 11:40 am
Posts: 3361
Would help to know what is comfortable for you... I have a turbomatic for sale, I just can't get on with them but others won't use anything else...


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:35 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2015 8:11 pm
Posts: 93
Location: Telford, Shropshire
I don’t not know what is comfy, to be honest. My existing saddle is a Brooks professional, which was great when I rode last in the early 80’s. I’ve tried softening it up and persevering riding with it, but it isn’t anything like it see to be


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:53 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 10:55 pm
Posts: 481
Location: YORKSHIRE
first thing to do is get your sit bones measured.A lot of riders are using saddles that are far too narrow for their pelvic bones and are supporting their weight on soft tissue.Read a while ago of one chap who was peeing blood after a long ride. Not my idea of a good day out.A decent road shop should have a measuring set up. After you have done that you can find a saddle that supports you based on the measurements that you have.Takes a lot of guesswork out of choosing a saddle. As an old guy with old guys problems I am now using a selle smp. Ugly thing but to be honest if they did not exist I would have been out of cycling by now. As it is I can sit on it all day . The difference between a good saddle and a bad one amounts to far more than just the amount of padding


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 8:58 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 10:55 pm
Posts: 481
Location: YORKSHIRE
Saddle is probably the same Mark but after 35 years you will have changed.Sorry but thats life.Could make it really depressing by telling you that it gets worse but those joys are yet to come.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:06 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2015 8:11 pm
Posts: 93
Location: Telford, Shropshire
Great advice!! I know my pelvic bones will have changed, but.....I am only just returning to cycling, because of a near fatal car accident. It resulted in me losing a leg, but I nearly lost my life. The way I actually propel a bike, with one leg doing all the work, means I don’t sit on a bike the way most ppl do.

I had no idea though, that good bike shops had measuring set ups


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 10:49 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 10:55 pm
Posts: 481
Location: YORKSHIRE
I live near stiff cycles in nidderdale and they did saddle measuring. You sit on a plastic pad and when you get up there are two oval marks imprinted from your sit bones.They will offer you saddles based on the results but I measured the external and internal measurements and made up a cardboard pattern like a dog bone so I have a permanent device to compare with.There must be other shops that can do this for you.I think your problems may be a lot more complicated than simple measuring though.I can imagine you sliding side to side a lot and that will cause problems.Have you tried various saddle heights and angles. Perhaps even twisting the saddle to one side slightly.I think you need to experiment before spending on a whole range of saddles.You may find the answer is a simple ajustment


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2018 11:37 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2015 8:11 pm
Posts: 93
Location: Telford, Shropshire
I’ve adjusted the saddle back and forth a few times, and I’ve also twisted the saddle, so it isn’t ‘square’ to the top tube.

You are correct with me sliding a little bit. Compared to my racing days of years ago, I ride nowhere near as smooth as I used to, and I only average inside 10mph, so I only ride gently, compared to averaging 20mph like I did.

I can’t afford to buy a new saddle every few weeks, which is why I wondered about going down the second hand route


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 12:13 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 10:55 pm
Posts: 481
Location: YORKSHIRE
Firstly.If no one near you does measuring I have heard of people using talcum powder and coloured card on a flat surface.Matter of trial and error. You are looking for two ovals about five or so inches apart.Try using an old fashion shamy short liner ( or make something up to try )Shamy sticks to the skin when it gets warm and that transfers the friction to the outside of your shorts. I have ridden thousands of miles with that as the only padding on brooks saddles and never a problem. Finally put the bike on a turbo and get the other half to look and see what is going on re the sliding.Could even take a video on the phone or camera so you can see.SMP saddles sorted my problems but they may not work for you.You may need to ditch the brooks though. It will be too contoured to your old self.You may just have to go through a few saddles to sort this so second hand may not be a bad thing. Start with the measurement and then at least you get saddles that fit.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2018 7:09 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2007 12:15 am
Posts: 7680
Location: North Yorkshire
It’s so much more than just the right saddle, very complex and comes down to needing a full bike fit!
Firstly racing bikes are designed to be ridden in a flat backed position, with weight evenly distributed between bars saddle and pedals. As we age we suffer with back problems, so prefer a higher hand position (you know the scene!—high stems. Bikes too big with tall head tubes, it no seatpost showing, positive rise stems. All this does is place more of your’ weight on the saddle and less on the bars and pedals=sore arse and worse. Also you may be less aero, so slower and make riding hard work!
Saddle width and profile is more important than padding, some are flat, some shelve some have pressure cut outs. It’s a long and oft expensive job finding the right saddle! I actually find a hard saddle far more comfy at 60 years young! Than a padded one. What height/ build are you?


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