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PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2013 12:45 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2008 11:16 pm
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Location: #2058
I was thinking of converting my wheels to tubeless using the "No Flats Joe's Eco Tubeless System".
A couple of questions:
1 - Has anyone used it and if so is it any good?
2 - Can you use 'normal' tyres for it? (I don't want to have to shell out for new tyres also).
Cheers :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2013 7:34 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 05, 2011 10:53 pm
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Location: Single Speeding in the Capital of the FoD,UK
Cheapest way is to get some Schwalbe type tubes with removable valve cores.Then put the Stans fluid in the tubes. Double protection and a cheap solution


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2013 8:16 pm 
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I'm already running DH tubes with Bell's sealant squirted in them. Never had a puncture either (wait until next ride :facepalm: ).
I was just curious if it's worth it, rotational weight and all that stuff.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2013 10:03 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:42 am
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Joes isn't up to much. The Stans kit is far better.
There generally isn't much rotational weight saving, but if you are using dh tubes with sealant now. You'll save loads.
Any tyre should work. But have a good look around before you start for all the hints and tips you can find.

And putting sealant in tubes is pretty much the worst of both worlds.

btw. The reason for doing tubeless is really so you can run lower pressures, get more traction with less punctures.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 9:10 pm 
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Why is it the worst of both worlds? Extra puncture protection can only be a good thing if your not set up for tubeless. I run tubeless on one bike and filled tubes on another three, early days but can't see any negatives for doing this if you haven't got or can afford a running tubeless.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 05, 2013 8:24 am 
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Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:42 am
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You are carrying the extra weight (sealant plus tube)
Filled tubes don't actually seal as well as just tubeless (the tube moves against the tyre and keeps breaking the seal, it's more noticeable with larger holes).
You can't run the low pressures that you can with tubeless, as you may get pinch damage to the tube (leading to large holes in the tube, which might not seal), low pressures (and its knock on effects of lower rolling resistance and more traction) is the single biggest advantage of tubeless. FWIW I run between 20 and 30 psi on all my MTBs, so does the wife. Her 29er and our CX bikes (all running tubeless) have been down below 20.
Eventually the tube will stick to the inside of the tyre due to the sealed punctures (thorns etc), and you *might* end up splitting or tearing the tube.
Many tubes are filled with powder (chalk or talc), you can end up with a solid lump of rubber bouncing round your tube, mixture of the powder and sealant. (You get this with proper tubeless as well, but it takes ages. >12 months usually.)
Can't use tubes with latex in them (not with latex based sealants anyway).

If you are just doing it to puncture proof a hack/winter/commuter bike, it's good. For anything else, you may as well go tubeless.

BTW, if you have some old tubes, you *could* go ghetto tubeless. Which won't cost you anything but the sealant and/or a couple of 24" tubes.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 11, 2013 9:59 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2012 10:02 am
Posts: 212
Location: Devon
Just done it on the rear wheel of my 1991 Cannondale Beast of the East as an experiment.I did use a Specialized Ground Control Tyre (which is tubeless ready) plus a Stans No Tubes kit,but the rims are old school Mavic 237.Used a compressor on first inflation,it held air,so I deflated and added a scoop of sealant.Held initially but went down overnight,so the next day I added another scoop and it has remained inflated.

Reason I did it is that I have now gone two seasons tubeless on my 2004 Enduro without a puncture.At the same time I changed the rear tyre on my Enduro and took it down my lane to spread the sealant around,about a mile.The next day pressure was slightly down and I noticed a tiny white spill of sealant on the tyre where I had got a thorn puncture which had then sealed.

Hope this helps


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 19, 2013 8:00 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:57 pm
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You don't need to buy the Stan's kit - google ghetto tubeless. A rim strip can be made from a split 20" inner tube. Running tubes with sealant is pointless, you're just adding weight, increasing rolling resistance for limited benefits. Conti tyres on Stan's rims are a good combo IME.


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