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PostPosted: Fri Aug 09, 2013 3:08 pm 
retrobike rider
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As a complete tubeless tyre novice I have what are probably a couple of dumb questions so bear with me!

The bike I have just bought has got tubeless tyres already fitted by the previous owner, but here's the think...They have been fitted with the rotational direction the wrong way round! :facepalm:

So my questions:

- Can I remove the tyre in the regular way with levers?
- Will I need to clean off the old latex solution before I can re-fit?
- Will I need a new valve?
- Whats the best kind of sealant to use?
- Will a track pump be adequate to inflate the tyre or should I use a compressor?

Thanks in advance for any help!

Doug


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 09, 2013 9:13 pm 
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true tubeless tyres should not have latex, they have bead that seals on the rim.

anwers in order: yes, no, no, ?, unlikely.

they may be harder to get off so push the tyre into the cenre of the rim in order to help get them off.

once fitted, you need to get the edges of the tyre to the sides of the rim for sealing - I found that putting the tyre onto the ground and then pressing it so the tyre flattens helps out the edes into the side but not all the way.

you need to put in a large volumne of air rapidly to forve the edges out to seal - a tack punp won;t do that but give it a try - dribble some wate + washing up solution arind the edges of the tyte to help make the seal .... but expect having to resort to using the compressor.

oh, and whilst you are at it, check the tyre for foreignb object embedded in the tread.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 09, 2013 9:43 pm 
retrobike rider
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I've had a thought and thinking stuff it I'll live with the tyres being the wrong rotational direction! My LBS even said that some people choose to run them that way by choice...the tyres are Schwalbe Racing Ralph snake skin 29er...I think I may need something more knobbly in the winter mud though!

Doug


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 09, 2013 9:51 pm 
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Well, just in case:
After you 'pop' the tyre bead into the well of the rim and release one side, use a syringe to decant the old sealant into a container - you can reuse.
You may find a sliver of dried sealant around the tyre bead which may stop it resealing so worth checking around the tyre. 'Cauliflower' globules inside the tyre typically indicate a sealed puncture - may be worth repairing?
When you reseat the tyre, it needs to be snug or it'll be difficult to seal - I try and tease the bead out towards the edge of the rim.
Removing the valve core helps to get high volume of air into the tyre for initial inflation - if the bead 'snaps' in position then you've probably been successful.
I've always had success with Stans sealant and a track pump.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 09, 2013 10:05 pm 
retrobike rider
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monty dog wrote:
Well, just in case:
After you 'pop' the tyre bead into the well of the rim and release one side, use a syringe to decant the old sealant into a container - you can reuse.
You may find a sliver of dried sealant around the tyre bead which may stop it resealing so worth checking around the tyre. 'Cauliflower' globules inside the tyre typically indicate a sealed puncture - may be worth repairing?
When you reseat the tyre, it needs to be snug or it'll be difficult to seal - I try and tease the bead out towards the edge of the rim.
Removing the valve core helps to get high volume of air into the tyre for initial inflation - if the bead 'snaps' in position then you've probably been successful.
I've always had success with Stans sealant and a track pump.



Thanks for that...I will be changing them out for winter tyres at some point...I thought that the latex would have all hardened? Interesting to know that there would still be liquid inside...I do have a small compressor so maybe that would be easier...

...btw did you see what I got 29er wise Monty??


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 10, 2013 12:48 am 
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Mine popped on well with no valve core, soapy water and a co2 cartridge :D

WD :D


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 10, 2013 1:25 am 
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Depends what tyres they are...
"Proper" tubeless tyres that need no sealant are a waste of time. Use "Tubeless ready, TLR, " tyres. They are much lighter and with sealant will repair themselves after a puncture.
Remove the skanky blobs of sealant around the bead before fitting. This will help them seat. Manually, try and help the tyre into position and slosh the sealant around by spinning and tilting the wheel.
An old tyre should only need a track pump to inflate. Some new ones need a compressor, or alternatively fit it with a tube for a couple of rides to soften up the sidewalls. after all, it's been folded in a shop for a few months so will need re-educating.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:51 am 
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WD Pro wrote:
Mine popped on well with no valve core, soapy water and a co2 cartridge :D

WD :D


a co2 cartidge is no track pump - is able to supply a large volume of air pretty quickly, unlike the TP.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:53 am 
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Or turning new tyres inside out and leaving them for a day or two before fitting gets them into a much nicer place.

If you have a compressor and a bit of time, it should be possible to (carefully) take them off, refit and reinflate without losing the sealant. (I do it quite often, and have a 24l compressor, which can pop almost any tyre on in seconds, and the rest of them given a few minutes!)

And proper tubeless tyres really do need sealant, but not much, or the first thorn turns into an utter nightmare.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 10, 2013 10:21 am 
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02gf74 wrote:
WD Pro wrote:
Mine popped on well with no valve core, soapy water and a co2 cartridge :D

WD :D


a co2 cartidge is no track pump - is able to supply a large volume of air pretty quickly, unlike the TP.


I know, that's why I used one ;-) instant inflation and two loud bangs as the beads seat :lol:

WD :D


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