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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 8:39 pm 
Gold Trader / MacRetro rider
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Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2008 6:36 pm
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Location: Edinburgh
File a slot in the head of the bolt to allow you to get a screwdriver in there,
Then before attempting to job with real force,
Get the kettle boiled and pour some water over the bolts
It should help break the thread lock as the hubs aluminium will expand a little bit more than the steel bolts
Has worked for me every time I use it :wink: GOODLUCK

G


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 8:59 pm 
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Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 1:32 pm
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Location: Staffordshire
I think they are steel so are a pain when the Hulk does them up. Even getting a slot in them can be tricky.

The boiling water trick has got to be worth a punt before breaking out the Black and Decker.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 9:31 pm 
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Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2010 10:08 am
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Location: French Alps/Annecy
Thanks gents, top advice. Off to the diy shop tomorrow for a file, and give that a go with the boiling water nefore I start drilling.

Cheers


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 10:09 pm 
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B77 wrote:
Thanks gents, top advice. Off to the diy shop tomorrow for a file, and give that a go with the boiling water nefore I start drilling.

Cheers


If you do decide to drill, I'd use a fairly large drill that will only drill the bolt head. This way you will have the maximum amount of stud left to get your Mole Grips on.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 10:53 pm 
retrobike rider
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I had the rounded torx head problem. I drilled the head just enough to get a flat bladed screwdriver into it and then a couple of short sharp taps with a small hammer on the screwdriver to get it to bite. Then simply turn the screwdriver and out comes the bolt sweet as you like.

IMPORTANT Refit rotor using Allen headed bolts 8)


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 10:53 pm 
Moderator /Lincs, E & S Yorks Deputy AEC
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Enid_Puceflange wrote:
File a slot in the head of the bolt to allow you to get a screwdriver in there,
Then before attempting to job with real force,
Get the kettle boiled and pour some water over the bolts
It should help break the thread lock as the hubs aluminium will expand a little bit more than the steel bolts
Has worked for me every time I use it :wink: GOODLUCK

G


This method is very good

If I find a rotor bolt that's stubborn & I've not rounded it off I'll go straight for the kettle & make a cup of tea

oh and use some of the hot water to soften the threadlock

Then they're much easier

If the head is rounded off, it's cut a slot time & use a screwdriver. I like the ones that have a hexagonal part to the shaft as you can use a spanner on it to turn the screwdriver whilst applying maximum downward pressure on the screwdriver to stop it slipping out of the slot you've cut

Then it's drill the little *@!$*? out if all else fails..


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 9:03 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 9:55 am
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Location: The land of Lea & Perrins
I had this exact same problem a couple of weeks ago.

The bolts were torx (T25), and I managed to round one of them off using my T25 tool.

I swapped my T25 tool for a better quality one (Sealey, from memory), and it managed to find some purchase on whatever was left of the bolt heads, and the bolt came out easily.

What I'm saying is that it might simply be worth trying a good quality T25 tool before going down other avenues, as you could save yourself a lot of hassle ;)


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 10:35 am 
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Location: Herts UK
if you are able to support the rear of the bolt holes - I suspect not - then an impact driver would help - this is basically a tool that has a ratchet that you hit with a hammer, when hit, it will turn - the idea being that it will not slip in the bolt head.

if you end uo having to drill the bolts out - good luck - it isn't going to be easy.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 10:35 pm 
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Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2010 10:08 am
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Location: French Alps/Annecy
Got all the bits lined up, gonna have a crack at them tomorrow.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 23, 2012 9:37 am 
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Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2010 10:08 am
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Location: French Alps/Annecy
And they're off ! about a gallon of boiling water and a good twatting with the impact driver and they're out, had to do 3 on one wheel and 4 on the other, threads absolutely covered in locktite blue.
Thanks for all the sparklingly great advice.


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