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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 2:29 pm 
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I realise that this is probably a very silly question, but I've got a Shimano HG93 chain and I need to remove a few links from it. It's currently fitted to the bike and I can't see any special links/pins as an easy clue on how to remove it.

I've tried removing it with a standard chain tool, but the pins won't budge. Is it just a case of winding on one of the pins until it pushes through, or is there a special pin which I should be looking out for, which I've missed?

Again, sorry if this is an obvious question - I've removed and refitted lots of chains but this one has me a bit stumped!

Edit - the pins all look like this:

Image


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 8:29 pm 
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There should be a pin that looks different to the rest (maybe only from one side though) but that's the one it was joined with last time so it's not the one you want to remove this time. Split it at any of the other pins, push the pin all the way out and then re-join using either the proper Shimano over sized pin or a SRAM power link, either of which you will have to buy.

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... elID=52598 - the leading part is a guide to make it easier to press in the actual pin. The guide goes all the way through and out the other side, you then snap it off with some pliers

I'd go with a power link myself, much easier and they work fine with 9 speed shimano chains.

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... odelID=871


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 8:44 pm 
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Not sure I believe that 'need a new pin' thing that Shimano say, I've broken and joined a lot of HG chains and reused the pin with no problems, thie most important thing is not to bend the link halves. As James said the power links seem to work well and have a good reputation.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2012 9:44 pm 
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Never bother with the aftermarket pins either, I do add a SRAM link when bodging one for someone else, to allow them future convenience.

Good quality splitter is the answer, and a good old manual flex and jiggle once she is back together to make sure all the links are free.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 9:04 am 
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Thanks for the advice :)


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 9:44 am 
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The pins on Shimano chains (and some others) are peened over at the ends once installed. Pushing the link out therfore enlarges the hole in the outer link, thats why you are suposed to re-join them with a new oversized pin. I think alot of people don't bother joing them with said proper over sized pin but instead just push the standard pin back through the now enlarged hole. At the same time Shimano chains have a bad rep for breaking, you have to wonder if there is a common factor here? Also If you shift under heavy load (changing down whilst pedaling up a steep hill, as many people do) you are putting alot of sidways load on the links too which will try to pull the outer plates off and the one with undersized pin/oversized hole will be very suceptible.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 10:31 am 
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JamesM is spot on.

... but back to OP - all but one of the pinsw will be identical - the one that is not is usally more black in colour - not being racist but that is how it is - and the other giveaway is that the ends will not be dimpled like the rest.

i spllit such a chain - lemme get down and take a photo to sjhow what I mean .... hopefully it is as I remembered it.

laters ......


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 22, 2012 10:58 am 
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Them chains, you spill the chain, you'll destroy the pin while doing so (KMC are also like this) as the bulge at the side will snap and then it'll push the pin easily.

Just keep going with your tool until it gives (or in some cases the cheap tool gives ;))

Use their pins in my opinion or the quick links
The pins don't cost a lot really (quick search) http://www.rosebikes.co.uk/article/shim ... /aid:38211


or how Shimano put it
http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/techd ... 686193.pdf


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 23, 2012 9:02 am 
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you usaully - or used to - get a spare pin when you bought a shimano chain.

£ 1 for a pin - what I remember themn costing - is outrageous!!!!

here is the photo. I have split and rejoined the chain twice now - it is on the commute bike so we'll see how long it lasts. :?

I believe this is the original joining pinm the the replacement break away type as it is flat on both sides - seem to rember the breakaway pin being dimpled on one side and then once fitted, have a waist where the bit that is broken off was attached.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 23, 2012 6:07 pm 
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That looks like the original joining pin. It won't be a break away type as it doesn't need to be, it will have been pressed into the outer plate by a machine at the factory (so no need for the breakaway guide). New Shimano chains come like this with a pin all ready pressed into one of the outer plates at the end. The oversized joining pins with the breakaway guide are for re-joining chains that have been split.


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