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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:04 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Location: At the pinnacle of fuckwittery
I'm in the midst of building my first SS project, and I need to know how to set up, or achieve, the best chainline, to avoid the associated problems.

Anyone got any advice? OR a link to tech info on this little job?

Cheers


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:10 pm 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner
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Its not that difficult really, and nowhere near as many things to consider as when setting up geared systems.

If you are using a SS kit on a freehub, with the spacers that fit on the freehub, just shuffle them and the sprocket around to acheive the straightest chain with the chainwheel.

This is assuming a "magic gear" or verticle droupouts. If you have a tensioner, you might have to either adjust that to suite the position of the chain, or fiddle with the spacers a little more to get it lined up.

Chainwheel can be fitted either inside the cranks (middle ring) or outside (large ring) to get the best results


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:10 pm 
BoTM Winner / PoTM Winner
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Is this for real?


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:12 pm 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner
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hollister wrote:
Is this for real?


:?: :!:


G


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:13 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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With my TREK SS i just used the Mk1 Eyeball!!!! you can see it the chain is not straight. Having a selection of spacers for my rear sproket means you can at least try differenct combo's out till you get it spot on. :D


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:30 pm 
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You can do it by eye or measure from the centre of the seat tube to the teeth on the chainring and then make sure the rear sprocket is the same distance from the centre of the hub.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:56 pm 
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Quote:
With my TREK SS i just used the Mk1 Eyeball!!!!


I have the newer MkII and that's even better, it comes with the "not walking into things" app. :P


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2012 1:58 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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xerxes wrote:
Quote:
With my TREK SS i just used the Mk1 Eyeball!!!!


I have the newer MkII and that's even better, it comes with the "not walking into things" app. :P


I must up-grade, although my broken little toe has fully healed from walking into the Bed a few months ago. havig the Mk2 will prevent further mishaps........ ;)


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2012 2:36 pm 
retrobike rider
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Location: A wretched hive of scum and villainy...
I run a long steel straightedge across the chainring and see how it lines up with the sprocket. Straighter the better, but don't worry about the odd few millimetres.

Actual chainline (relative to the centreline of the bike) makes very little difference.

There are too many combinations of chainring positions, chainlines, hub widths etc to be more definitive.

All the best,


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2012 4:40 pm 
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"I run a long steel straightedge across the chainring and see how it lines up with the sprocket. Straighter the better, but don't worry about the odd few millimetres."

Precisely so. I built/converted many fixeds, where chainline is more important than single free. Mount the ring as far inboard as bottom bracket/frame allow, then the straight edge to indicate ideal placing of sprocket (it's nearly always easier to fine tune the rear than the front). Even with fixed, +/- 5mm is OK.


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