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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 9:37 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2011 11:57 pm
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Location: Antwerp, Belgium
I might have to check out my Formulas then, because they don't use a reservoir. I know Hopes and Shimanos do use a reservoir indeed. Not too sure about Avid and other brands, because I never paid much attention to those.

Still, an open system will only really affect the master cylinder. Calipers should work regardless of what kind of master cylinder you use.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 10:16 am 
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Avid, Formula e.t.c are open systems to my knowledge ortherwise they would not be able to deal with the heat build up. The reserviour is hidden in these.

I don't understand though why Formula, Hayes and Avid all have unusual bleed procceedures. Well the are unusual compared to every car disc brake system made, where you fill the reserviour, open the bleed nipple press the brake pedal, close the bleed nipple and repeat until no air comes out. Avid's bleed proceedure is a recipie for the home mechanic to get air into the system.

A cheap way to disc brake is with Avid's BB7 brake. It may be cable operated but it works so well.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 10:19 am 
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Location: Staffordshire
I've been trying V brakes for the first time. Very impressed I am too.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 11:22 am 
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Location: Wales
To be honest, well set up V brakes only let you down on rides where there is lots of gloop. and gnarly downhills.
My main preference for Discs comes from the fact that you can ride for longer/harder without suffering from wrist bonk.
In the dry, I don't think that V brakes are far behind.
It's more hassle cleaning a disc set bike, as you need to make sure you dont get water dispersers and lubricants near the calipers.


Last edited by ratbane on Tue Apr 24, 2012 11:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 11:24 am 
Old School Grand Master
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Location: Behind you with the duct tape pulled out.
Magura HS's best brakes I have ever used. Not so good if your a gorrila on the brakes but with a gentle touch they are excellent.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 1:02 pm 
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Quote:
I might have to check out my Formulas then, because they don't use a reservoir.


They do, it's just not as obvious to look at as some. It's between where the hose comes out and the bar clamp.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 1:30 pm 
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Location: Whiskey bent & hellbound!
I don't quite get people when they talk about discs being hard to set up and a hassle to maintain etc. nothing touches them in the mud/wet, easy to bleed as well (Shimanos)

Vs are great in the dry though and I do like the looks :D


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 1:59 pm 
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Location: Herts UK
last year I converted totally from V-brake to disc.

can't say my V-brakes ever let me down, apart from one occasion where the pads wore out 1/2 way through a ride due to mud ... oh and the cable snapping on one pair so that is two occasions.... but they did the job of retardation veyr splendidly

my main motive to changing to disc is that the rim is no longer worn away - far easier to undo 6 bolts to replace the disc than to spend several hours dicking about replacing a rim and trueing up the wheel.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 4:23 pm 
Gold Trader / rb Rider / Special
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Agree with that, and buckles tend not to affect disc brakes - that was the main thing for me although i dont buckle wheels as much as i used to.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 8:02 pm 
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Neil G wrote:
I don't quite get people when they talk about discs being hard to set up and a hassle to maintain etc. nothing touches them in the mud/wet, easy to bleed as well (Shimanos)

Vs are great in the dry though and I do like the looks :D

Completey agree with this. Don't get the discs are hard to maintain thing - fit and forget. With my avid the brake pads can be replaced in about a minute and haven't had to bleed them in over a year with no loss in power. NOt saying I don't like v's as I do, but from a maintenance thing discs are much easier IMO


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