Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Thu Dec 08, 2016 6:05 am

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 34 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:50 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 23, 2010 9:29 pm
Posts: 625
Location: He doesn't live in "The You-Kay"; he lives in GREAT BRITAIN!
Will new shed have a pitched roof? That can create more space. Also have you thought about some kind of fold down work bench. I'm not sure if it will be particularly sturdy but it will save space and flat surfaces tend to accumulate "Stuff" on them...
Also remember bikes take up much less room if they have their stems twisted through 90degrees and their pedals taken off. That makes them almost flat.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 5:18 pm 
BoTM | Gold | PoTM
BoTM | Gold | PoTM
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 2:20 pm
Posts: 8684
Location: Sunny Cornwall
Rich Aitch wrote:
Will new shed have a pitched roof? That can create more space. Also have you thought about some kind of fold down work bench. I'm not sure if it will be particularly sturdy but it will save space and flat surfaces tend to accumulate "Stuff" on them...
Also remember bikes take up much less room if they have their stems twisted through 90degrees and their pedals taken off. That makes them almost flat.


More than likely have a pitched roof depending on price that is


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 5:38 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 12:33 pm
Posts: 11105
Location: The Home Of Mountain Biking, And All Great Things.
Is your size limit purely based on cost?

Based on what you have right now, and the positioning, I would go for something with the largest footprint I could get away with.

Height restrictions?

Asymmetric roof can provide more user friendly internal headroom without excessive height.

Extending the base and roof out for a veranda would provide the perfect area to shove your work-stand up for most of the year, being Cornwall.

Large sliding door onto veranda most practical as well as doors at either end.

The issue of cost.

Several ways to overcome this.

Recycle some of your existing shed. (Probably least desirable, looks like it has been overlooked a little of late.)

Start by concentrating on the base and a waterproof shell, you won't need to insulate it until autumn. This could be achieved for very little money. Just a bit of graft really.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 5:52 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 2:48 pm
Posts: 1323
Can't you just put your foot down and buy a second smaller shed for the rubbish?

Keep the larger shed for you, it's okay when you put all your wages into house and family and say hey this is mine..deal with it

Then buy a smaller shed for the kids crap and rubbish and gardening tools

Everyone needs a man only space. I tell swmbo..in that space I recharge to do the crap she and the kids don't want to do, interupt that then money will be spent on tradesmen and that will impact on her and the childrens shopping trips.

My man cave remains child and female free, has a small beer fridge, old stereo, all the tools I need, a comfy chair, but mostly importantly it has the space for me and me alone.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 5:54 pm 
BoTM | Gold | PoTM
BoTM | Gold | PoTM
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 19, 2012 2:20 pm
Posts: 8684
Location: Sunny Cornwall
highlandsflyer wrote:
Is your size limit purely based on cost?

Based on what you have right now, and the positioning, I would go for something with the largest footprint I could get away with.

Height restrictions?

Asymmetric roof can provide more user friendly internal headroom without excessive height.

Extending the base and roof out for a veranda would provide the perfect area to shove your work-stand up for most of the year, being Cornwall.

Large sliding door onto veranda most practical as well as doors at either end.

The issue of cost.

Several ways to overcome this.

Recycle some of your existing shed. (Probably least desirable, looks like it has been overlooked a little of late.)

Start by concentrating on the base and a waterproof shell, you won't need to insulate it until autumn. This could be achieved for very little money. Just a bit of graft really.


Believe me there's absolutely nothing salvageable from the old shed! I've got a decent sized garden so it's all about the cost really. Would love something bigger with a veranda but budget won't stretch to that and because the new shed will be going where the old one is it needs to be up and watertight in a day.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 6:40 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 12:33 pm
Posts: 11105
Location: The Home Of Mountain Biking, And All Great Things.
I see. Well you can always extend it at the front or side later.

Main thing with making it good is the roof, so I would have that ready to lift on before killing the old shed. Corrugated bitumen works well, as you can incorporate clear panels for light. Depends if you want an insulated, warm in winter shed though.

Depends on what you plan to use for the floor, but one option to get a roof up fast is to use Postcrete to erect corner posts, hanging joists to tie them in. That would take less than a couple of hours, then you could lift the roof on. I used this approach to make a pal's bike shed, as we had only a few hours of daylight to get the job done.

You could use prepped panels to finish the job, or a nailgun and cladding. My favoured option would be prepped panels, windows, doors and all done ready to go.

If you use T&G cladding, you can expect it to be fairly weather tight from the get go. Once you have capped the corners and finished the doors and window voids it should work.

If you wanted it snug for winter you would need to insulate it, but that is a long way off.

How are you taking your power to it?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 6:46 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
User avatar

Joined: Sun Nov 23, 2008 10:44 pm
Posts: 3265
Location: Rushden......ish
[/quote]Believe me there's absolutely nothing salvageable from the old shed! I've got a decent sized garden so it's all about the cost really. Would love something bigger with a veranda but budget won't stretch to that and because the new shed will be going where the old one is it needs to be up and watertight in a day.[/quote]

Just make sure you have the floor lifted off the ground as high as possible so water doesn't work its way upwards.

Mines got 3 four by two's on breeze blocks keeping it off the ground. Wrap them in plastic or waterproof membrane too if you can (wish i did).

But even if it's just for bike kit it'll still get filled with cr*p :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 7:01 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Sun Jun 27, 2010 9:37 am
Posts: 3976
Google pallet sheds. Make it huge for very little cost.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 8:08 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2011 10:42 pm
Posts: 2189
Location: milton keynes
heres my effort


Attachments:
IMAG0041 (800x533).jpg
IMAG0041 (800x533).jpg [ 364.16 KiB | Viewed 645 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 9:51 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 14, 2010 11:27 pm
Posts: 1421
Location: mid cheshire
i've got to agree with the veranda idea - if you are on a pitched roof rather than an apex job you can extend a small area (a 4x4 run of 3x2" flags gives a decent space) buy a couple of shiplap fence panels & run them in an L shape from the back of the shed across the back & down one edge of the flagged bit, the shed fills in the other edge & you leave the front open to make maneuvering in / out easier. if you put in substantial enough posts in the corners you can also hang a matching pitched plywood roof & throw some roofing felt on it (or use the clear corrugated plastic roofing sheets fom b&q) to give you a good covered work area where the stand can live or where things can be put while you are inside.

you can sell this to the missus as an ideal place to store the garden furniture etc. through the winter (& even use it for that if you really wanted!)



my own man-cave arrangements are a bit messed up at the moment. I'm currently in a 20x7 foot block shed however it is destined to be a prep kitchen for my new business so once the outside is rendered & i have the cash to start wiring up & plumbing the internals then I will be moving into a 6x4 ish lean-to on the end of the outbuildings. it is a fairly steep pitched roof so i'm planning to stick a few hooks along the wall at the high side to hang the bikes from & an old filing cabinet in the corner for spares. maintenance will be done in my 'other' block shed that is earmarked for equipment storage for the business but it will have a long enough free wall to have a home made fold away stand mounted on it with my tools sitting in the drawer unit on the worktop opposite.



half of the current shed...

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 34 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group