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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 4:18 pm 
Devout Dirtbag
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Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2011 3:48 pm
Posts: 132
Location: Hertfordshire
I havent been too motivated on doing much on my bikes but I have a new cruiser and want to paint the wheels but also want to build my own from scratch so now I have decided to teach myself.

I see there are a few books about on Wheel building but I was hoping for some advice/tips and which one is the easiest to make sense of. I am into cruiser bikes so I dont need anything too much geared towards race bikes

Any help much appreciated as wheel building might keep me busy over the winter months :-).

Thanks


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 4:49 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
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Joined: Fri Aug 08, 2008 2:36 pm
Posts: 16747
Location: Yorkshire, England
If you are a beginner or even with some knowledge from years gone by and wnt to refresh it.
Then spend £9 on
http://www.wheelpro.co.uk/wheelbuilding/book.php
The Professional Guide to Wheel Building
Written by Roger Musson



Easy to understand, explains what you need (and how to make some) and why things are done that way.
A few videos as well if needed and soon to be updated a little bit.

and if you don't like it or the style then you can get your money back.

Honestly I used it after 15 odd years of not building a wheel, it was clear and concise. It seemed perfect for a beginner as well.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 8:29 pm 
Gold Trader / rb Rider / Special
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Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2009 12:26 am
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Location: Rurally close.
There was a thread about 2 weeks ago, try and find that one for some useful info.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 10:02 pm 
Devout Dirtbag
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Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2011 3:48 pm
Posts: 132
Location: Hertfordshire
great thanks both. I have never built a wheel as I not the most patient person but I know once I know what I am doing it it easier than it seems plus I want the satisfaction of doing it myself

Thanks for the tips on the book and the other thread


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 2:49 am 
Gold Trader / rb Rider / Special
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Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2009 12:26 am
Posts: 16165
Location: Rurally close.
No problem.

As you say it is sooo much easier than it is often made out to be. And it is very satisfying and sometimes frustrating when you cant build wheels but it would be oh so helpful if you could!

I taught myself this year around june and have built approx. 10 wheels or so already. Really really enjoy it.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 3:16 am 
retrobike rider
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Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2010 12:17 am
Posts: 877
Location: At The Gates Of Dawn
I've just built my first pair of wheels and very satisfying it was too. I found Sheldon Brown's site very helpful here:

http://sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html

I am also going to buy the Roger Musson book mentioned by FluffyChicken - there's also a link to it in Sheldon's site.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 3:37 pm 
Devout Dirtbag
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Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2011 3:48 pm
Posts: 132
Location: Hertfordshire
thanks, I will give that book a go. I havent worked on bikes since I was a kid, so am learning the hard way again :-).

Bought some 9/16 pedals for my cruiser and then found out the thread was too wide, aaaarrrghh. Pity as I really like the pedals, DMR V12 Mag.

Oh well not sure what to do now, do I get new cranks to suit the pedals (they dont come in 1/2 inch on the V12) or do I send them back and settle for a different pedal. I dont like any of the others, so will have to wait and see


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2011 6:39 am 
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Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2011 5:14 pm
Posts: 341
Location: Newcastle
i just used one of the MANY guides on youtube to be honest.

Built my first wheels just a few months back, they are still going strong with no issues, a lot of my MTB mates thought i was crazy, and i would balls it up as its so technical and hard :roll:

But then they all said the same when i started building 2.5 engines for my old impreza, or when i learned how to map the ecu, or when i started modifying the turbo etc etc.

Heres a vid of my first wheel build a few months back, its not 100% as it has a little "hop" but its pretty dam straight, and to this day its still in the same condition (around 250 miles later, although i did remove the red alloy nipples as they were too soft)

http://youtu.be/njQfrhLNK_4

I have no doubts that the next one will be spot on, its an easy job to do tbh.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2011 10:32 am 
Devout Dirtbag
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Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2011 3:48 pm
Posts: 132
Location: Hertfordshire
Nice attempt, what tools did you need to do it? I want to start off with the basic tools and wing it that way. I did buy that book online some of the others recommended but cant seem to know what tools I need.

I will be only really building wheels for my bikes and future ones, so will be beach cruiser bikes with 26'' or 24'' wheels with rims from about 30-50mm, so need the right tools for those.

Thanks all so far. I am feeling a bit daunted but am going to give it a go. Some tools seem so expensive so I just want to start off with the bare minimum I need to get the job done. Not sure about a tensioning gauge or a truing stand but I mean the otehrs like the bit to get the tyres off, the nipple tool etc


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2011 1:09 pm 
retrobike rider
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Joined: Fri Aug 08, 2008 2:36 pm
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Location: Yorkshire, England
The only tools you need are the spoke key and something to put the wheel in to true it up. Like the bike frame/forks. Everything else just makes it easier and more accurate.

You can put a side gauge on the bike, like brake black, zip ties, rulers taped to the frame etc.
The ebook has a dishing tool setup that is worth having (the cardboard thing), though turning the wheel around in the frame will get you close.

Up/Down bob in the wheel is harder but again a ruler in the Frame/Fork or some other idea you can come up with will get you close.

It might be worth getting a spoke key, finding a wheel you have that could do with a true up and have a go at that first and get used to it. That is the hardest part after all. Once you've done that, actual lacing of the wheel from scratch is just following a pattern or instructions, then the rest is the true up part.


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