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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 2:12 am 
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Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2009 8:52 pm
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Location: Costa-del-Oldham
After recently purchasing the 2006 kona king kikapu frame from EarlofBarnet (excellent & trusted trader btw), I have built it up using all the components from my Gary fisher hardtail.

Took it out with my mates at weekend & I really struggled with the uphill bits. Downhill & over bumps is was brilliant & I just wish I had some left in the tank to push the bike to its limits but I was buggered.

Weighed it at work on some big arse digital scales and it is 30.2lbs

Now looking round on the net, this seems to be dh bike territory.

I'm unsure if it's just me being a mard-arse & needing more time to get used to the bike or is it really a bit on the porky side?

What do your fs xc bikes weigh?

Where's the best weight saving to be made?

Thanks

Adam

I'll post spec when I get home tomorrow to see if I can get some pointers.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 8:14 am 
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My personal opinion is that is heavy for xc. Assuming you like the handling and fit of the frame the best opportunity for weight saving is to change the wheels and tyres. I'd then consider forks next, though that might be an expensive thing to change.

You wont save much weight easily or cheaply from derailleurs, shifters and brakes. Pedals, bars, seat and seatpost are all worth a look though. Cranks too. However if you consider changing so many parts, it might be better to consider a different bike.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 9:07 am 
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Thanks for that

Yeah I think the wheels are definately on the heavy side & bars & seatpost could do with lighter versions


Ill look into it.


on the plus side, I appear to have actually lost 2lb from Konas original weight !!

Haha


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 9:36 am 
Moderator /Lincs, E & S Yorks Deputy AEC
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Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2007 6:16 pm
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Location: RetroModding™ since 1988
DH bikes weigh from 35lb (pro spec) to well over 40lb

XC bikes can weigh from under 20lbs (weight weenie) to ~30lb

I have had FS bikes weighing from 25lb (120mm travel carbon frame) to 28lb (140mm travel alloy frame)

Without knowing the spec of your bike it's hard to say where the weight is, but tyres & tubes are a cheap way of shedding weight. Bars, posts and saddles can also hide a lot of weight


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 9:58 am 
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I've got a factory spec proflex XPX and it tips the scales at 28lb, It's probably just going to take some time to get used to.
Also it took me a while to get used to the bounce going up hill and it seems to require a more gentle approach to pedaling to get the best out of it. (Before the argument ensues it's different not better/worse)


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 10:07 am 
retrobike rider
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this is good to know, as i'm just completing an XC FS build. when weight saving, do chains come into this at all? along with rear cassettes? also, i'm guessing cutting seatposts down to your desired length would help - as well as choosing one made from a light weight material/construction....or am i delving into weenie territory there....???


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 11:00 am 
retrobike rider
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Part of the weight issue is that you are more than likely running disks on your full-suss. This'll add some weight over Vs

I think there's a element of weight-saving that can be acheived - but by virtue of the the fact that you'll be hitting a lot harder, I'm not sure I want the lose strength.

I could use the 100g inner tubes I use on lighter bikes - but would they stand up to the beating they will get.

I'm running X317 on Hope hubs - with fairly generic disks.
I'd be interested if there is a cheap, light and strong alternative.
Is there much weight to be saved on disks?


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 11:10 am 
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The strength issue is worth considering if it's a bike you intend to use regularly and properly.
I suspect a sub 25lb FS XC is going to cost a considerable sum ( my rigid XC is more than that :shock: ) and then for me there would be an element of protecting it and not fully enjoying it.
Just think of it as weight training :wink:


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 11:21 am 
retrobike rider
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NAILTRAIL96 wrote:
The strength issue is worth considering if it's a bike you intend to use regularly and properly.
I suspect a sub 25lb FS XC is going to cost a considerable sum ( my rigid XC is more than that :shock: ) and then for me there would be an element of protecting it and not fully enjoying it.
Just think of it as weight training :wink:


I could probably get my full sus sub 25lb - but what I don't want to sacrifice is reliabiilty.

My Weight-Weenie consultant has already offered me carbon bars - maybe I should see it as a challenge - but I don't want to be stranded haflway round the red route at Brechfa cos some lightweight part has given way.

@ Twain - yes chains and cassettes can offer a significant saving. I'm running a KMC SL9 and an XTR cassette on my lightweight.


Last edited by Carge on Thu Nov 17, 2011 11:35 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2011 11:29 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2011 11:57 pm
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Location: Antwerp, Belgium
Same here, my rigid is slightly over 29lbs. However it goes uphill just as fast as my modern 26lbs hardtail does with the fork on lockout.
Actually the rigid is faster if I don't use the hardtail's lockout.

So the question is : Is it the weight that's slowing you down on climbs or is it the suspension?


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