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PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 8:51 am 
retrobike rider
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MikeD wrote:
(Air pressure isn't preload, by the way, you're directly affecting the spring rate. The collar on a coil spring _is_ preload but doesn't affect the spring rate, which is a property inherent to the spring -- the only way to change it is to replace the spring).
[/quote]

I don't know rear shocks much (or modern forks) but do they have a similar oil bath or other such adjustment for air volume so you can maintain the spring rate/progression at different pressures ?


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 2:18 pm 
Old School Hero
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Anyway in an absolute kind of way, suspension (Unless way too SOFT) is better then no suspension.

And

AIR SUSPENSION, is lighter and more adjustable then COIL SUSPENSION.

Hence

COIL SUSPENSION, is heavier and less adjustable then AIR SUSPENSION.

Undoubtedly they are ride differences between coil and air.

And without a doubt many people will swear that their coil shocks are brilliant, and aren't interested in the newer air suspension on bikes these days, as long as your bike rides the way you want it, who cares.

In another philosophical statement, I like my suspension firm. I’m not a large person by anybodies description (Perhaps the world is heavier for me, then it is other people, perhaps the ground is harder for me then it is for other people. Perhaps McCoy of StarTrek would be baffled by the extra gravity, Physics defying phantom unseen second nature menace that follows me everywhere).

So what mountain bikes do obese people ride?

Well really fat people drive cars, or get driven around in cars. Not that being fat is a prerequisite of being a car driver, or passenger in a car, cars are far more convenient aren’t they.

So obese people don’t really ride suspension bikes because to generalise they’re not interested in exercise, or an alternative method of commuting/travel to work (etc) in cars/taxis/motorbikes/mopeds/buses.

Hence for larger bikes, bike manufacturers fit forks/shocks of higher rebound tune and higher compression tune.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 5:25 pm 
Devout Dirtbag

Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2011 5:03 pm
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Quote:
AIR SUSPENSION, is lighter and more adjustable then COIL SUSPENSION.

Hence

COIL SUSPENSION, is heavier and less adjustable then AIR SUSPENSION.


I think we all get that ;-). I am not sure you understand the rest of what is being said though.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 10:49 pm 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
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I am obese and I ride a bike!

My suspension bikes include air, coil and elastomers. Spread between a specialized fsr with rock shox reba sl fork, 2 coil pro flexes and one elastomer, coil equipped Klein mantra with a bomber and a trek 9000 coil rear, air oil front.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 11:57 pm 
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Quote:
I don't know rear shocks much (or modern forks) but do they have a similar oil bath or other such adjustment for air volume so you can maintain the spring rate/progression at different pressures ?


Not usually. An air shock is just like a coil shock except that instead of the spring there's an air can. The spring and the damper are completely separate. Shocks are available with bigger or smaller cans but that's usually a choice made by the frame designer to work with their suspension layout. Fox did do an adjustable volume shock (the AVA) for a couple of years, but it didn't really catch on.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2011 2:05 am 
Old School Hero
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Well that is alot of MTB's, for 1 person.

I guess since your riding time is spread across some/all of your MTB's, maybe the time they take to get knackered is less.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2011 11:46 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Srands, you ride your bikes the way you want. There is nothing wrong with doing things your own way.

Do you have a lockout position on your shock?

It might be worth trying a pressure advised for your weight and then locking it out, if you hit anything big it will bypass anyway.

Incidentally, you have a job waiting for you if you ever want to come and work with my family doing wood panelling. ;)


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 Post subject: Lock out, of course
PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2011 12:39 am 
Old School Hero
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highlandsflyer wrote:
Srands, you ride your bikes the way you want. There is nothing wrong with doing things your own way.

Do you have a lockout position on your shock?

It might be worth trying a pressure advised for your weight and then locking it out, if you hit anything big it will bypass anyway.

Incidentally, you have a job waiting for you if you ever want to come and work with my family doing wood panelling. ;)


Rider preferences, are that preferences, but terrain changes, hence softer or harder.

FOX RP2 & FOX 32 F120RL, of course LOCKOUT is a feature!

Locally I only get big travel (8cm+) on drop offs, or jump landings, the local descents aren't that long or bumpy.

Well I'm not a joiner, but the CLADDING wood lengths are only cheap in packs from B&Q, I just made wooden frames on each side of the loft, and nailed the CLADDING lengths, to the wooden frame, looks good all done, getting there seemed to take forever, and looked messy whilst getting it all together, but was worthwhile doing, glad I didn't fit plasterboard, then plaster, then wall paper.


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 Post subject: Re: Terrain?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2011 2:21 am 
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Location: Cornwall.
srands wrote:
Well, when the terrain changes, isn't it nice to have setup that you can easily remember how to make softer/harder/quicker/slower, etc.


I suppose that depends on the bike, the rider and how well that rider has set their bike up.

I have pro pedal on my EX9, I never touch it, saying that I seldom lock out the forks unless I have a long climb on a fire road.

Granted, it took a little time fiddle with everything until it was just so, but now it's all set up I just ride it.


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