Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Sun Dec 04, 2016 1:37 pm

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 49 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 12:43 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2010 11:45 am
Posts: 1135
Location: Poppy Fields
Truly sounds like a bonkers set up. Not sure why you would get a suspension bike and then set it up to barely use it. I have about 165 in my RP2 and weigh about 190. Works perfectly and soaks up what I need it to and rarely even use Pro Pedal. If you wanted to ride like you have this setup you may have well gone for a hardtail IMO.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 2:53 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 3:39 pm
Posts: 1846
I've been riding full suspension for a few years now after being instantly sold on both the uphill, downhill and level of fun improvements.
Recently took my M2 hardtail round my favourite route and really noticed the lack of traction and increased frustration on bumpy uphills. I'm no FS fanboy, I still enjoy the purity and skill required to ride hardtails or rigids, but in certain situations FS bikes give more smiles per mile.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Depends doesn't it
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 3:57 pm 
Old School Hero
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 2:09 am
Posts: 235
Location: Hull, Humberside
Suspension depends doesn't it.

The Terrain, the person. A ride can have some harsh downhills, and some smooth XC trails.

Too hard suspension, and you'll be fatigued more quickly.

Too soft suspension, and it will absorb your effort, lessen your reaction time. Or you could say it will take the wind out of your sails, as your bike will react unexpectedly, like a big dog yanking hard on it's lead surprising you, odd analogy I know.

Locally where I live we all grew up riding RIGID mtb's, the roughest trails locally you could ride on a RIGID mtb, and all you'd think was that was bumpy.

I appreciate other counties bridleways and cycle parks, the downhills are far longer, with rougher terrain, hence the need for many to riders to have SOFTER suspension setups, then I ride with.

Whatever suits you, when you know what is too soft suspension or too hard suspension for you, for the terrain you're riding.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 4:02 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 08, 2008 4:18 pm
Posts: 2336
Quote:
I still think many people ride with their shocks too soft, I ride my rear suspension at highest reload (300psi), slowest rebound and with ProPedal on (Hardest setting). And I ride my Front Suspension at highest reload (125psi), 2 clicks away from slowest rebound, and with LockOut on at ½ (Medium approx).


Um. If you weigh over 20 stone that'd be about right. Although even then you'd be over the recommended maximum pressures for both fork and shock. Lots over in the case of the shock, max is 200 if I remember right. You definitely won't need Propedal if you're running 300psi. You're right that rear suspension enhances traction, but it won't with that setup.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 4:19 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2007 9:05 pm
Posts: 9245
I've always found on my own bikes that uphill performance is always hampered by the fat, lazy, 20-a-day, beer and kebab loving bastard riding it.

Uphill riding, uphill gardening- Its all the same in my book. Downhill is where the fun starts kids!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Whatever suits.
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 4:21 pm 
Old School Hero
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 2:09 am
Posts: 235
Location: Hull, Humberside
Whatever suits.

Where you live, I have not ridden trails you have ridden.

Where I live, you not ridden trails I have ridden.

What is right for me, is not right for you.

What is right for you, is not right for me.

People of the same height, have different leg lengths, different upper body lengths and different length arms.

Hence people of the same height, need different size bikes.

Also people of the same weight, ride differently to people of similar weight, they ride different areas, and they have different riding styles.

Suspension setup that is correct for a person, will be too soft or too hard for persons of very similar weight.

If people were all the same height/weight and rode identical trails, we wouldn't need different size bikes, adjustable suspension, etc. But the world is different all over, and people are all different, and ride with different styles, on different seasons/days of the year, at different times of their lives.

The point, adjustable suspension is a good thing, written guides, are only that a guide, starting point, as is advise from bike shops, magazines and websites. What is right for one person, is not right for another.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 4:24 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 08, 2008 4:18 pm
Posts: 2336
Quote:
The point, adjustable suspension is a good thing, written guides, are only that a guide, starting point, as is advise from bike shops, magazines and websites. What is right for one person, is not right for another.


Absolutely. But your settings are WAY, WAY outside any sort of sensible range. The idea is to start at the recommendations and then tweak (as in "adjust very slightly") to your preferences.

How much static sag are you getting with 300psi in your shock?

I mean, it's your bike and your business if you want to essentially haul completely ineffective suspension around the countryside. We're just trying to help. Believe it or not, some people here have considerable knowledge and experience of this stuff...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 4:34 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2010 11:45 am
Posts: 1135
Location: Poppy Fields
How much of your available is actually being used on the trails while you are out. You would need to be gargantuan to make it work as it should and I know from previous posts you aren't that big.

If your sag isn't really there and lets face it it can't be at those pressures then what happens when you go through a dip in the trail? Took me about a month to get to a setup I like and I am currently running my fork at about 40psi less than it says on the fork leg and about 10 psi less than that recommended for the rear.

I would stress that you should have a play with it, try a much lower pressure in either end and see what a difference it makes to the ride. Go for it, you may be surprised by what happens.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 4:45 pm 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 08, 2008 2:36 pm
Posts: 16743
Location: Yorkshire, England
Andy B wrote:

Sag should be set @ 30% on forks and shocks whilst sat on the bike in your riding gear...


Before or after breakfast ?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 5:12 pm 
Old School Hero
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 27, 2011 2:09 am
Posts: 235
Location: Hull, Humberside
MikeD wrote:
Quote:
The point, adjustable suspension is a good thing, written guides, are only that a guide, starting point, as is advise from bike shops, magazines and websites. What is right for one person, is not right for another.


Absolutely. But your settings are WAY, WAY outside any sort of sensible range. The idea is to start at the recommendations and then tweak (as in "adjust very slightly") to your preferences.

How much static sag are you getting with 300psi in your shock?

I mean, it's your bike and your business if you want to essentially haul completely ineffective suspension around the countryside. We're just trying to help. Believe it or not, some people here have considerable knowledge and experience of this stuff...


As Fox suggest approx 1.1cm/0.44" (For a 7.25"/18.41cm eye to eye, with Shock Travel 1.75"/4.4cm).

Even then, it's only a guide. It's nice to have the adjustability, isn't it.

Look at this way, on rear coil suspension, what you going to do, measure how much a spring compresses? Ok coil adjustments are more simple, turn one way for HARDER, turn the other way for SOFTER.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 49 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: 02gf74 and 15 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group