Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Sat Dec 10, 2016 2:04 pm

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 61 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 2011 10:26 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Sun May 29, 2011 7:25 pm
Posts: 220
Location: Swansea
WD Pro wrote:
Horses for courses ...

Looking forward to a TDF winner using a FS bike ... :lol:

WD :D


Seems more plausible than a world cup cross country winner using a road bike.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 2011 10:38 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Sat May 20, 2006 2:56 pm
Posts: 4776
Location: No brakes? Way to commit soldier.
d00m wrote:
WD Pro wrote:
Horses for courses ...

Looking forward to a TDF winner using a FS bike ... :lol:

WD :D


Seems more plausible than a world cup cross country winner using a road bike.


Or even a rigid mtb for that matter.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Oct 09, 2011 11:50 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 12:33 pm
Posts: 11108
Location: The Home Of Mountain Biking, And All Great Things.
World class xc riders generally use hardtails at the moment, I can see a point where they mainly use full suss as a preference at some time, but it may not be in the forms currently popular.

There would be 0 benefit to full suss as currently known on the TDF.

Any springiness and dampening required can be engineered into the rigid bikes.

It is all down to the size of the obstacles.

Someone mentioned cobbled roads, well I will totally agree on most rigid forks these are a pita, but try them on a Jones.

There is nothing about 'suspension' that some clever steel working cannot achieve, albeit with vastly different geometry.

When you ride a hardtail out of the saddle you are using the front suspension and your legs as full suspension, everything going forward rotates around the front contact point.

You load that up, and the rear is trailing.

Rear suspension generally only becomes efficient when seated.

Modern or not.

Standing makes me a dynamic and responsive machine, sitting makes the terrain dictate most of the time.

Getting back to the thing about the New Forest, I would have to say it is one of the most beautiful places I have ever been and whatever reason takes you there please go and experience it, to prove a point or not.

:)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 2011 10:12 am 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:32 am
Posts: 1596
Location: Worcestershire / West Midlands
Can't let a thread containing road bikes and cobbles pass without mentioning the Paris Roubais (never heard of this race until my brother mentioned it to me the other week). Road bikes on classic cobbled streets; a race for hard nuts if ever there was one. Everyone flat out and sideways on tiny tyres, no suspension and clouds of dust.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z24N1GhAM70

And I used to think downhillers were mad... much respect to the roadies. :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 2011 10:56 am 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 08, 2008 4:18 pm
Posts: 2336
Quote:
the point I think I am making Confused is that even on a flat (i.e not hilly) and rough (i.e. not road tarmac) surface, an FS will be faster, reasoning being that the bumnps are soaked up by the suspension so the rider CoG is not moving as much as it would on rigid so less energy is wasted by the rider.


It needs to be rougher than a gravel track, which is what jonnyboy's loop is on. It's also not a long enough route for the fatigue-reduction benefits of FS to make themselves felt, and (I suspect) lacks the kind of climbs upon which the traction benefits would be apparent either.

I love FS bikes, but they're clearly not the fastest bikes under all off-road circumstances. The bumpier and longer it is, the better, and the threshold of bumpiness is certainly not all that high, but it's higher than gravel ;)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 5:58 pm 
Gold Trader
Gold Trader
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 11:19 pm
Posts: 1859
Location: Gwlad Gwlad to be here
If you think the Paris-Roubaix is craziness you should see what the 3 Peaks Cyclo Cross is like. I'm going at 30 miles an hour downhill across 'gravel' the size of footballs occasionally glancing down to see my carbon forks deflecting backwards and forwards about 50mm in each direction.

What is surprising is how much abuse a rigid bike will take especially with a good quality modern carbon fork. First time I did the Tour of Flanders ride I thought that the bike was going to disintegrate. It didn't and I found out I rather liked riding cobbles at high speed once I trusted the technology.

Not sure how you'll test this as mostly it's down to technique.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:38 pm 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 12:33 pm
Posts: 11108
Location: The Home Of Mountain Biking, And All Great Things.
Carbon is amazing.

I used to messenger on a totally rigid klein with a carbon seatpost, given the geometry it was acting like a suspension unit, very effectively until it sheared.

:)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 11:14 am 
retrobike rider
retrobike rider
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:32 am
Posts: 1596
Location: Worcestershire / West Midlands
highlandsflyer wrote:
Carbon is amazing.

I used to messenger on a totally rigid klein with a carbon seatpost, given the geometry it was acting like a suspension unit, very effectively until it sheared.

:)


You see what you need there is some full suspension to take the strain off the components... :lol: (ducks and runs for cover)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 12:36 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 11, 2011 11:21 pm
Posts: 1389
Location: Bristol, UK
petitpal wrote:
Can't let a thread containing road bikes and cobbles pass without mentioning the Paris Roubais (never heard of this race until my brother mentioned it to me the other week). Road bikes on classic cobbled streets; a race for hard nuts if ever there was one. Everyone flat out and sideways on tiny tyres, no suspension and clouds of dust.


Just an excuse to post a pic:

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 13, 2011 1:50 pm 
98+ Moderator
98+ Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 05, 2011 10:53 pm
Posts: 4098
Location: Single Speeding in the Capital of the FoD,UK
My full susser is very confortable, great and fast on technical sections,

BUT

Feels very heavy compared to my RB's and importantly not as much fun to ride.

I enjoy mixing it up and the different riding styles involved (even if i find myself aiming for the big roots on my rigid's as I would on my modern susser !)


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 61 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: keitht and 18 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group