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 Post subject: Brake disc question
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 10:28 am 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Location: Perfect Sound Forever
Hi

Hydraulic brakes are all a bit new for me...

Anyone know what size rotors i need for an M585 LX hydraulic setup?

Also, am i best with floating disks, I don't fully understand the terminology but having never even ridden a disc bike, I'm concerned with how much the pads will rub the disks when not braking! hell, i still run U-brakes for gods sake!

Any info gratefully received!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 10:47 am 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Disc Brakes set up correctly should not rub on the rotor.

Shimano usually have quite good clearance and are easy to set up.

Floating rotors are a stainless outer with an aluminium centre to reduce heat build up, it's design is to let the outer expand slightly when hot and return back to its original shape once cool. That's for extreme us though.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 11:21 am 
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Location: Herts UK
^^^ wot he said. when you release the brake lever, it draws the pistons in resulting in pad to disc clearance. the pads are kept away from the disc using spring (formula, shimano, avid) or magentised pistons (magura).

rotors come in two types of mount: 6 bolt and centre locking rotor so this must match your hub. (actually hope did a 5 bolt mounting but you can discount that unless you have those hubs)

rotors come in variety of diameters, from 140 to 230 - typically 160 is the common for both front and rear , with 180 often going on front. you will need to find out what is the max. disc diameter for the fork and have the appropriate adapter.

brake calipers come in two fittings: IS and post..... but that is another topic.

floating rotors look bling and are generatlly lighter than the steel equivalent; the advantage touted is that they will not warp - they tend to run hotter since the heat finds it hard to cross from the rotor to the alloy carrier due to the construction. there are floating discs with carbon carriers available, very very bling but £££££


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 11:56 am 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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^^^^And what he said too better explained though :lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 7:40 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Thanks guys - top info... :D


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