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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 7:18 pm 
Old School Hero
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Location: Hull, Humberside
AHEADSET for me is far better:
~ Comes loose far less often
~ Far easier to adjust tension
~ If parts strip threads, (i.e. Star nut washer, bolt and stem) then these can be replaced pretty cheaply.

I know the older conventional nut headset, can be good, I had a 1 1/4" conventional nut headset on my rigid Cannondale M700, it was smooth for years, hence when it works why mess about and replace it, but when you have a naff setup it's really annoying that you end up throwing money at.

Anyway my Cannondale's conventional nut headset, I replaced with reducer cups (1 1/4" to 1 1/8") & aheadset, just so I could have suspension forks at the time, Marzocchi Bomber's, as then, no manufacturer or bike shops did any sus forks in 1 1/4". My initial reservation about using reducer cups, is this might be a bit of a bodge, but it wasn't no creaking, sweet.

Anyway back to conversation about bearings. I bought standard 5/32" bearings in a race from HALFORDS for my 1 1/8" aheadset.
THE TOP RACE WAS A GOOD FIT
THE BTM RACE WAS A BAD FIT, SO I USED my old top race that was a perfect fit.

(L/H) HALFORDS 5/32" BEARING RACE top of AND (R/H) MY ORIGINAL 5/32" BEARING RACE top of:
Image

(L/H) HALFORDS 5/32" BEARING RACE btm of AND (R/H) MY ORIGINAL 5/32" BEARING RACE btm of:
Image

Of course I could have justed packed bearings in with lots of grease without a race, but I'm not keen on this idea, as bearings could become dislodged more easily on final adjustment OR riding.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 8:11 pm 
retrobike rider
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Location: Yorkshire, England
Bearings and their races change. For a start most are cartridge bearing now and not loose (or loose in a cage) though you do still get them, but they are not so common.

Pop the balls out of your old cages if the cages are ok and put the new balls into it.


Last edited by FluffyChicken on Thu Jul 21, 2011 8:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 8:13 pm 
Retro Guru
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srands wrote:
Of course I could have justed packed bearings in with lots of grease without a race, but I'm not keen on this idea, as bearings could become dislodged more easily on final adjustment OR riding.


It's the best way ... ;-)

WD :D


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 8:36 pm 
Old School Hero
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WD Pro wrote:
srands wrote:
Of course I could have justed packed bearings in with lots of grease without a race, but I'm not keen on this idea, as bearings could become dislodged more easily on final adjustment OR riding.


It's the best way ... ;-)

WD :D


Well NOT a good way, ESPECIALLY for those who like to SWAP their FORKS around a fairbit (Slang for often), imagine all the bottom bearings scattering all over the floor EVERYTIME you swap your FORKS.

Well many fork steerers won't just pop out once top cap and stem has been unbolted, normally I do the following:
~ Get somebody to hold the front end of the bike off the floor (Or bike in stand off the floor)
~ Place a bit of wood (wide and strong enough to sustain impact from lump hammer) on top of the fork steerer, then hammer top of wood on top of fork steerer until fork pops out.

NOTES:
~ The purpose of the piece of wood is to prevent the hammer from damaging the top of the fork steerer.
~ The hammer I would use is a LUMP HAMMER, because it weighs more then a normal hammer (Approx double), and it has a bigger head (It is more of rectangle flat face, then a conventional hammer) hence more force.

LUMP HAMMER:
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 8:40 pm 
Retrobike's #1 Comedy Genius
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 10:07 pm 
Retro Guru
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srands wrote:
WD Pro wrote:
srands wrote:
Of course I could have justed packed bearings in with lots of grease without a race, but I'm not keen on this idea, as bearings could become dislodged more easily on final adjustment OR riding.


It's the best way ... ;-)

WD :D


Well NOT a good way, ESPECIALLY for those who like to SWAP their FORKS around a fairbit (Slang for often), imagine all the bottom bearings scattering all over the floor EVERYTIME you swap your FORKS.


I didn't say it was the easiest way - especially if you like swapping forks :lol: but it is a good way, in fact it's rumoured to be the best way ... ;-)

WD :D


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 10:51 pm 
Retro Guru
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Location: It's not easy being a dolphin.
:shock:

I for one would not bring a lump hammer anywhere near a carbon fork column.....or alloy....or to be frank the entire bike (especially when trying to hold a piece of wood too)!

Try this;
- take the top cap and stem off the fork column.
- screw the top cap back on the fork column.
- have one hand holding the bike up.
- have one hand holding a rubber mallet.
- strike the top cap with the said rubber mallet.

This is normally enough to dislodge the fork - without the fork and bottom bearing race flying out limiting more potential damage. A bit of grease on the fork column wouldn't go a miss. Hope it helps your journey into Aheadsets.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 11:08 pm 
Retro Guru
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This sounds like a job for fork removal man ...































Image

:lol: :lol:

WD :D


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 11:11 pm 
Retro Guru
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Location: It's not easy being a dolphin.
Just come back from the bathroom, but still ROFL....


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 22, 2011 10:33 am 
Old School Hero
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Location: Hull, Humberside
Fair comment, a RUBBER MALLET if you have one. B&Q or Wilkinsons or Screwfix Direct or Boyes (All UK DIY shops), probably sell these.

OR a LUMP HAMMER with a bit of wood.

The end result is the same, loose forks!

A RUBBER MALLET doesn't weigh as much as a LUMP HAMMER, but you wouldn't have to mess about with a bit of wood.

A LUMP HAMMER is heavier, but you need a bit of wood to prevent from damaging the steerer, of course, there would (Aha) be some wood splinters to clean away from the top of the steerer and star washer.

But of course not everybody will conveniently, have a solid chunky length of WOOD, handy to use (In a draw, cupboard or tool shed somewhere!).


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