Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Sun Dec 04, 2016 3:06 am

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Bad Backs and Bikes ?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 1:44 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:44 pm
Posts: 2159
Location: Tamaris
I am beginning to get the impression that many here suffer bad backs, so I have just got to ask, of those who have bad backs how many of your ride a hardtail ?

You see, sitting on that saddle any terrain hits the bike receives goes straight into the spine, ok, there is a bit of damping via saddle and tyres, but that all depending on what tyres you are running and at what pressure, also the seat, is it a racing seat of a nice big squishy gel comfort seat. If one is geared up for racing, high pressure road orientated thyres for speed and uncovered seat, you actually in a worse position than what you are when walking as your legs act as shock absorbers.

So, is it a good idea riding a hardtail with back issues, would it be better to have rear suspension and the weight that goes with it or at least those shock posts that everyone seems to eschew.

I compromise, I ride a hardtail with big 2.1 tyres at 40 psi, loads of rolling resistance, but the damping of trail shocks is pretty good, my back does not complain too much.

So with our apparent love for retro hatrd tails, we just have to remember our age and experience related ills, bad backs are it seems way too common, and if you are fond of diuretics, alcohol, tea and coffee, it makes the situation worse.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 2:31 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2008 9:19 am
Posts: 2093
Location: Sheffield, top city
I'm not big into MTBing, but from what I have done and from riding over rough roads, is it not the case that the weight is borne by your legs, not bum/spine. Just sitting there like the prov bag of spuds means no weight redistribution and just a case of crashing through the potholes. its the same argument against many in the CTC mag bemoaning the use of a rucksack for off road biking instead of using panniers. Eventually the rack/pannier fasteners would fail, as well as your back wheel if it wasnt all supported by moveable springs (ie your thighs). But then Im no offroad expert


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 2:39 pm 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
User avatar

Joined: Thu Apr 10, 2008 4:16 pm
Posts: 9609
Location: brigg, home of the gypsies
i have 1 propper full sus bike (99 specialized fsr), a 92 proflex (flex stem and an elastomer out back - very little travel) and a modern hardtail. (retro hardtail sold and awaiting replacement) so i feel i can comment on this.

i find riding the specialized i tend to sit down and plough through. what little finesse i have dissapears.

i ride the pro flex like a hardtail. when the trail gets bumpy you raise your ass slightly off the saddle. not stand up and arse still in contact but my weight is on the pedals allowing my legs to take the bumps.

the advantage of the pro flex is that the tiny vibrations are smoothed out - the kind of thing you'd normally just ride out. i guess that is the same principal as a shock post?

soft tails are the future in my opinion


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 2:48 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:44 pm
Posts: 2159
Location: Tamaris
pigman wrote:
I'm not big into MTBing, but from what I have done and from riding over rough roads, is it not the case that the weight is borne by your legs, not bum/spine. Just sitting there like the prov bag of spuds means no weight redistribution and just a case of crashing through the potholes. its the same argument against many in the CTC mag bemoaning the use of a rucksack for off road biking instead of using panniers. Eventually the rack/pannier fasteners would fail, as well as your back wheel if it wasnt all supported by moveable springs (ie your thighs). But then Im no offroad expert


For road I have always fancied the WindCheetah SL from way back, but I resist due to cars, ( dont trust any of them) and the fact that here it is very hilly, don't fancy pushing one of them up a hill.

But for loads and because of my back, I use panniers and just slow down on bumpy terrain.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:19 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 04, 2006 11:25 pm
Posts: 1913
Location: North Herts
Quote:
bad backs are it seems way too common, and if you are fond of diuretics, alcohol, tea and coffee, it makes the situation worse.


that explains it then :lol:

I think it's the position on the bike, if my back is playing up I ride a modern with it's sit-up-and-beg riding position it helps alot.......even had to resort to this at Mayhem which resulted in much derision mid-lap from EdEdwards :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:31 pm 
Gold Trader
Gold Trader
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2010 10:17 am
Posts: 7889
Location: Mid Suffolk
If you were riding lumpy terrain that would send shockwaves up yer bum, surely you would be out of the seat?

Been a long time since I done any off-roading but I'm out of the seat even going up a kerb..

That said, I have read a coule of times that people have gone full-sus at least partially due to back issues so maybe there is something to it?? :?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:32 pm 
Gold Trader / rb Rider / Special
Gold Trader / rb Rider / Special
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2009 12:26 am
Posts: 16165
Location: Rurally close.
i ride full sus but rarely sit down (mostly just for coasting really)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:32 pm 
Special Retro Guru
Special Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 29, 2008 11:34 am
Posts: 5663
Location: Don't mess with monkeys, man
silverclaws wrote:
So with our apparent love for retro hatrd tails, we just have to remember our age and experience related ills, bad backs are it seems way too common, and if you are fond of diuretics, alcohol, tea and coffee, it makes the situation worse.

Conveniently ignoring alcohol for a second (well only really when taken to excess) - there's talk about the natural diuretic effect of things like tea and coffee (because of their caffeine content). Well the mild effects of caffeine where water is concerned, tends to be a drop in the ocean (quite literally :wink: ) in comparison to their normal delivery mechanisms - if you get my drift.

In short, compared to the "carrier" liquid, it's largely irrelevant.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:39 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:44 pm
Posts: 2159
Location: Tamaris
either way, whatever leads to a dehydrated state does not help the packing between the vertebrae, why people get shorter as they age, the packing, disc things get thinner with obvious results, less shock absorbing, tie that with aged bones and we have breaks of less flexible areas which is common in the elderly, hips and knees leading to replacement surgery. My mother has just had two knee replacements done.

I suppose the rule of thumb is if you feel the need to drink, then you are dehydrated, but if you are constantly drinking then something is wrong let alone ones back disc things.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 3:45 pm 
Special Retro Guru
Special Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 29, 2008 11:34 am
Posts: 5663
Location: Don't mess with monkeys, man
silverclaws wrote:
either way, whatever leads to a dehydrated state does not help the packing between the vertebrae, why people get shorter as they age, the packing, disc things get thinner with obvious results, less shock absorbing, tie that with aged bones and we have breaks of less flexible areas which is common in the elderly, hips and knees leading to replacement surgery. My mother has just had two knee replacements done.

I suppose the rule of thumb is if you feel the need to drink, then you are dehydrated, but if you are constantly drinking then something is wrong let alone ones back disc things.

I think you're conflating things, that's all.

If I was to speculate, most people who have back issues, it tends to be soft tissue / muscle.

Now I can't say as I've ever researched the impact of dehydration on people who have back issues actually related to the spine itself, but what I would say is that for most people (unless to some weird excess) that drinking caffeinated beverages will have precious little effect on them being dehydrated, because the amount of liquid in them vastly compensates for the mild diuretic effect of their caffeine content.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group