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 Post subject: Pinching the Inner Tubes
PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 7:09 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 8:06 pm
Posts: 224
One thing I hate about bikes is dealing with the tyres. In every 3-4 times I'd pinch the inner tube with the levers.

I've tried soap, KY personal lubricant :) but I haven't found a 100% efficient way.

Point me out to a good thread or share your experience.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 7:21 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Thu Nov 26, 2015 7:29 pm
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Location: peak district
You dont need to use levers :wink: just pop them on with your hands, end of pinched tubes 8)

Mark


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 7:55 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Thu Apr 30, 2009 9:47 pm
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Location: Newbury, Berkshire
npn wrote:
One thing I hate about bikes is dealing with the tyres. In every 3-4 times I'd pinch the inner tube with the levers.


Slightly inflating the inner tube helps to cushion it from the poking around of the tyre levers if you do use them.... and use good quality like Park Tools.

npn wrote:
I've tried soap, KY personal lubricant :) but I haven't found a 100% efficient way.


I wouldn't introduce anything water based inside the tyre carcass :shock: - I always use Talcum Powder 8) .

Anyway.... like Mark said, just use your hands. Unless they are a real tight fit, you should be able to cope without levers.... even a skinny waif like me can manage most of the time.

Pip.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 8:09 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 8:06 pm
Posts: 224
Some tyres I could pop them my bare hands some I couldn't. Powder is what i'll try next


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 8:23 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:42 am
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Talc is the first thing to try, tbh, when i started out it used to be on the instructions for some top end tyres and tubes.
And technique, you've got to get the bead right into the wheel well. Or you'll never get the rest of it on.

Only time i've come close to using levers in recent memory was trying to get some CX tyres on tubeless MTB rims. Came within about 5 minutes of getting the levers out...........


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 8:25 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Location: peak district
Mostly technique. Used to swap Dh tubless tyres regular, learnt how to do it with just hands after snapping a lever claiming to be unbreakable :roll: that really hurt..

Talc is a good idea, not sure how it would help putting them on, unless really hot day and the tyre compound is super soft :) but good for stopping the tube sticking to inside of tyre and spinning round with the tyre when you brake hard, causing the valve to tear out :evil:

Mark


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 8:46 pm 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2008 9:42 am
Posts: 3156
Proper talc is a pretty good lubricant. Though you've not been able to get proper talc for ages.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 8:47 pm 
GOLD | PoTM | Rider | rBOTM
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Combination of slight tube inflation and opposite bead in centre of wheel well/rim is my bestest tip. Have yet to be beaten by an MTB tyre just using thumbs. Save the valve area till last and push the valve out slightly to seat the bead properly around it.


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 11:41 pm 
Old School Grand Master
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Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 2:33 am
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Location: daaan saaaf
This is the technique I use:



Stand the wheel on the floor, make sure the beads are in the centre "trough" of the rim, then push the tyre around the rim towards floor, then pop the last bit on with my thumbs.

Some tyres are tighter than others, but I can generally get them off without levers too, using a similar technic, where you push the tyre around the rim to create some slack, then rolling the tyre over the rim; if that makes sense.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 25, 2018 11:49 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 10:52 pm
Posts: 208
Location: manchester uk
I swapped the Ritchey wheels on my rockhopper because the tyres were so tight I ripped the sidewall on a tyre trying to get it back on after a puncture repair. I wasn't even using levers I pulled the bead out with my thumbs trying to stretch it over. I'd already snapped a plastic lever and bent a metal one. Luckily I was off the trail and found a second hand shop. The only thing they had in that would do the job was a massive straining spoon with a flat handle. Felt like I was changing a tyre with a crowbar but it went on.

Seriously though old cutlery makes an excelent tyre lever. Old spoons the likes of which were found in your nan's kitchen work better than any tyre lever I've used. Apart from the strainer but fitting a pair of 18" spoons in my seat bag is a bit much.


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