Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Mon Oct 22, 2018 2:24 pm

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 31 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Sid Mottram rebuild
PostPosted: Fri Feb 12, 2016 2:11 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2015 10:17 pm
Posts: 22
More pictures. This time with a camera - not a telephone. The right tool for the right job.


Attachments:
052.JPG
052.JPG [ 76.02 KiB | Viewed 563 times ]
047.JPG
047.JPG [ 44.41 KiB | Viewed 563 times ]
042.JPG
042.JPG [ 74 KiB | Viewed 563 times ]
041.JPG
041.JPG [ 57.59 KiB | Viewed 563 times ]
032.JPG
032.JPG [ 96.49 KiB | Viewed 563 times ]
010.JPG
010.JPG [ 95.67 KiB | Viewed 563 times ]
009.JPG
009.JPG [ 99.23 KiB | Viewed 563 times ]
006.JPG
006.JPG [ 96.69 KiB | Viewed 563 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sid Mottram rebuild
PostPosted: Fri Feb 12, 2016 2:15 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2015 10:17 pm
Posts: 22
More pictures


Attachments:
096.JPG
096.JPG [ 56.75 KiB | Viewed 562 times ]
089.JPG
089.JPG [ 70.83 KiB | Viewed 562 times ]
085.JPG
085.JPG [ 51.32 KiB | Viewed 562 times ]
081.JPG
081.JPG [ 52.02 KiB | Viewed 562 times ]
076.JPG
076.JPG [ 101.21 KiB | Viewed 562 times ]
072.JPG
072.JPG [ 54.65 KiB | Viewed 562 times ]
064.JPG
064.JPG [ 83.71 KiB | Viewed 562 times ]
055.JPG
055.JPG [ 54.25 KiB | Viewed 562 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sid Mottram rebuild
PostPosted: Fri Feb 12, 2016 2:18 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2015 10:17 pm
Posts: 22
More pictures


Attachments:
127.JPG
127.JPG [ 55.45 KiB | Viewed 560 times ]
122.JPG
122.JPG [ 68.83 KiB | Viewed 560 times ]
121.JPG
121.JPG [ 63.11 KiB | Viewed 560 times ]
114.JPG
114.JPG [ 58.53 KiB | Viewed 560 times ]
099.JPG
099.JPG [ 57.93 KiB | Viewed 560 times ]
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sid Mottram rebuild
PostPosted: Fri Feb 12, 2016 2:57 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2015 10:17 pm
Posts: 22
Just taken it for its first ride. It was wet so less than a mile. The frame feels good. A bit like a titanium road bike.

The handling was pretty tight and no over steer or wallowing in the corner. It takes a line and feels firm. Not an overly harsh ride. I am used to carbon forks and this seemed road buzz free, but no hard miles yet. There must be a reason why people have carbon. I am impressed at first call. Mostly by the lightness. I haven't put it on the scales, but is a lightweight bike, rather than a clunker. I could easily take it on a club run. The gear shifters are also fun. Set off in the big dog and felt pretty foolish. You have to plan your ride more.

The brakes squeel! I had forgotten this. I had been warned they split your ear drums! I was worried about braking distance.. and it turns out for good reason. How have they improved modern brakes so much? Is it the blocks? I really concentrated on rebuilding them with the right washers and spring tension, to try and get the maximum out of the design.

I am riding tubs. I was worried about punctures, but haven't applied the flint catchers yet.

I discovered I haven't routed the front mech cable properly, but it didn't affect the shifting. Very pleased with the shifters, as I had not expected them to be up to much. I expected a lot of drift, but none so far. They re also firm but light. Just a reach when you are used to Stis.

The bars? Well I was expecting the worse. They are narrow and the brake leavers are at a hell of an angle and look a little ungainly. But they seem to fit ok when riding on the hoods and not as un-natural as I expected. It reduces my profile to the wind and probably gives me a few extra watts. More importantly I love the look. It is so old school and remind me it is not a normal bike.

I have yet to really test everything on a really long ride. As you can see I have set it up with a tall seat post with a set back. That is to fit me. A straight candlestick post would not be enough of a saddle set back for my fit. This is really a race fit rather than a touring position, but hell I am sure that is what track bikes are for.

The paint I am really pleased with. I surprised myself. Applying CLR stopped the need to treat every area with a Dremel and sand paper, or fill in with paint smudged by hand. It meant I had to remove the minimum of the paint (I only lost a few flakes when polishing with 0000 wire wool). It looked really bad at first with no CLR treatment, but that just evened it out taking away the bright orange of rust and turning it to dark steel-grey rather than a deep black (as you get with some rust treatments). The lacquer has taken it down a shade or two in colour and made the pitting black.

But the four coats of lacquer has evened out the pitting. The colour sanding I did after with 400., 800, 1000, 2000 paper and finally T-Cut gives it a professional finish which is more rubust. Because there was so little paint I was worried my idea would make the bike look really rat. I did think my mates would be more impressed with a re-spray. But I stuck to my guns. To me it has preserved the originality of a period bike more than sending it off to Bob Jackson for a re-spray and paying £260. Yes a respray look is fabulous, but in the post war era of Britain on rationing such a look does not fit.

There are a couple of reallt desirable frames on ebay - a Legano and a Viking which look great resprayed. But they dont seem to be attracting much attention and have been on for a good six months. Maybe its the money - a bargain why you know how much a good respray cost. Or the fact the people who liked these bikes in their hey day are now in their late 70s and are unlikely to be buying them. I don't know.

But I am pleased with my little Mottram.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sid Mottram rebuild
PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 9:37 pm 
Old School Hero

Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2014 12:29 pm
Posts: 157
Location: SE Wales
This is a great rebuild, with an excllent choice of components. I was very interested in you using the 2 pack laquer to preserve the original paint job.

I know what you mean about the lack of braking power with these old brakes. How I raced in the 1960s on bikes with GB Couriers without scaring myself I do not know. Modern compound Koolstop blocks are available for Mafac brakes, but are a bit pricey. Here is a link that may be of interest (they are also available in pink) http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Vintage-Mafac ... SwU9xUP5Lw.

The vintage Koolstops may be cheaper bought direct from the States.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sid Mottram rebuild
PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2017 12:08 am 
Newbie

Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2017 11:46 pm
Posts: 4
I have a road / path machine with an identical frame and forks to Viscount's orange & black Sid Mottram, which I have been trying to identify for years! The ironic thing is that when I was a teenager in the 1970s in Leicester, Sid Mottram was my local 'proper' bike shop and Sid was very helpful with finding me all sorts of parts, particularly when I needed repair the Sturmey brake / gear hub on my Dad's 1938 Paragon tandem after the axle broke. Sid was such a pleasant and knowledgable chap! I would be interested to know the frame number of Viscount's SM? Mine is 7417 and has the same curved originally un-drilled stay bridge, reinforced track ends, distinctive fork ends, nicely finished seat stays and double-plate fork crown. It has been a puzzle and I would love to know who built it, as it is a superb frame. I can post some pictures if there is interest.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sid Mottram rebuild
PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2017 12:48 pm 
Newbie

Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2017 11:46 pm
Posts: 4
The rebuilt Sid Mottram looks a treat! I really like the way you have conserved and finished the paintwork, it is superb. I have a similar handlebar bend on mine, except they are a modern Charge version. I have ridden with them for about 15 years and I find them very comfortable, especially as mine have a shallow drop, which is good for my back! A bit of adjustment of the angle of the brake blocks may stop your brakes squealing - may be a bit of trial and error required. I have always ridden mine with a Weinmann 500 side-pull, but with fixed-wheel it gets much less use anyway. I love sprints & tubs, but I keep them for the boards indoors, as Manchester's roads need Marathons to avoid constant punctures! Enjoy the Mottram! :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sid Mottram rebuild
PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2017 6:22 pm 
Devout Dirtbag

Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 10:15 pm
Posts: 147
Location: Gloucester
Viscount here!
@Bikey Andy.

Haven't looked at the thread for ages. Sorry: )
I always keep good photographic records of all my bikes & if I have the SNs, whatever, I'll look & see what I have...
I know a good bit of history about mine.

I just looked & Serial No. 4791 on BB, repeated on steerer.
Any Qs, PM me or I'll answer on the thread.

SMs are cool: )


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2017 7:11 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2015 10:17 pm
Posts: 22
Thanks for the kind words. I still ride Sid. I would love to see your bike. They are rare. I am riding fixed at the moment, and no punctures for a while. The paint is stable a year on..so it worked


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Sid Mottram rebuild
PostPosted: Wed Apr 12, 2017 7:03 pm 
Newbie

Joined: Mon Apr 10, 2017 11:46 pm
Posts: 4
Sid Mottram Road-Path model

My SM has been in use in its current form (apart from the colour) for about 15 years. It is fitted with a Stronglight 49D crankset and an Alcorn Engineering 47T x 1/8” chainring, SPD pedals, Charge early pattern ‘Bowl’ bars, SR stem & 2-bolt seatpost with a Brooks B17 saddle. The wheels are Mavic 700c MA2 rims on Normandy LF hubs - double-fixed rear with a 20T sprocket and ‘chain-tugs’; tyres are currently 28mm Schwalbe Marathons for comfort and toughness. The brake is a Weinmann 500 side-pull with a Weinmann lever.

I use the Mottram all year round for commuting into Manchester as well as V-CC and CTC rides and it is a lovely bike to ride. As there is little chrome on it, the weather resistance is good, although it spends most of the winter covered in spray grease!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 31 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 14 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group