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PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2014 12:57 pm 
Old School Hero
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Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2012 5:06 pm
Posts: 232
Location: Diepenbeek
Hi all.

I have another (slow) project going on at the moment. Some years ago, I picked up a Flandria frame . The frame was rusty but no dings or dents. It stayed in my bike cave for some time, but then I got it powdercoated. It stayed like that for a couple of months, but then I decided to build it up with an early Dura Ace group.

Why Dura Ace? Because Flandria had important bonds with Shimano. They introduced the brand in the pro scène around 1973:

Quote:
In 1973, Flandria initiated another major development. The Japanese component manufacturer Shimano was eager to enter the European market but had made little headway. Bicycle components were mostly supplied by Italian and French manufacturers, and the thought of a Japanese manufacturer equipping professional bikes was considered laughable. Flandria, however, had acquired a reputation as a progressive and open team, willing to try new ideas, and they struck a deal with Shimano. In return for feedback and suggestions for improvement from the riders, the Japanese company would develop a brand new line of components specifically for the Flandria team: the Dura-Ace range. The Flandria-Shimano team was born. This was the first time that an Asian manufacturer’s components had been seen in the European races, and the association with Flandria saw the prestige of Shimano soar. Source:http://www.flandriabikes.com/history/chocolate-components-and-conspiracy
.

Also, the frame has Shimano SF dropouts, which I have never seen on these frames. And the tubing is probably Ishiwata, also a Japanese company. So this frame just screams for a tribute to this Belgian-Japanese connection :). The frame dates back to the end of the seventies, so I'm building it up with end seventies-beginning eighties components. I'm not going for perfectly period correct, but I'll choose for aesthetics and availability first.

I'll try to update the topic as much as possible, but don't expect this to be full built in some days :) Hope you enjoy!


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2014 1:14 pm 
Old School Hero
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Posts: 232
Location: Diepenbeek
1. The frame

I bought this frame with headset and bottom bracket. BB was Campagnolo record, headset Hattaswan. I guess the bike was built up with a record group, considering the marks they left in the rust on the frame. The frame is a real Flandria from the end of the seventies. One of the last iterations of their famous red-and-white race frames. They did rebrand them and those frames were sold by some bikeshops along Belgium, as this one. I compared such rebranded frames with the original Flandria painted bikes I also have in my fleet (viewtopic.php?p=1774893#1774893) and can't spot any differences. Same lugs, same dropouts (with this one as an exception), serial number in dropout, same geometry, same braze ons,... . The tubing also seems to be te same: Ishiwata 022. There was no decal on this frame, but I guess it's the same. Anyone knows how I can be 100% sure?

The frame, before the red coating:

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2014 1:57 pm 
Old School Hero
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Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2012 5:06 pm
Posts: 232
Location: Diepenbeek
2. The frame, ready for another 35 years

After a week or so, the frame was ready. I chose for a cheap powdercoat because I had a positive experience before with the firms work. Of course it's not the quality you get for a wetpaint, but it's not the same price either :). I'm quiet happy with the result. Back home, I took some time for the decals and lug lining. The lugs were lined with gold enamel, the cutouts with black enamel. The decals on the seat and downtube are designed by myself according to the originals and printed on vinyl by a local printshop. The headtube decal is NOS. The chrome on the chainstay and forks is not perfect, but good enough for me! The fork isn't on this pictures, because I hadn't cleaned it back then. The Campagnolo decal between the downtube shifters is not underneath the clearcoat, and will have to go since I decided to build it up with dura ace :)

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2014 2:54 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2010 6:31 pm
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That looks fantastic! The lugs still seem sharp and the paint is very clean looking. Can I ask who did it? Might need to have a frame powdercoated some time, so would be good to find someone who can do a decent job.

Funnily enough, I was just reading about Freddy Maerten's eexperiences with Flandria. I won't quote what he said here because it was not very positive, but turns out he had his frames made by an Italian builder called Lupo, who he contacted through Roger De Vlaeminck. So he did not use Gios frames as I previously thought. Just a bit of useless trivia there :D


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2014 6:31 pm 
Old School Hero
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Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2012 5:06 pm
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Location: Diepenbeek
Johnsqual wrote:
That looks fantastic! The lugs still seem sharp and the paint is very clean looking. Can I ask who did it? Might need to have a frame powdercoated some time, so would be good to find someone who can do a decent job.

Funnily enough, I was just reading about Freddy Maerten's eexperiences with Flandria. I won't quote what he said here because it was not very positive, but turns out he had his frames made by an Italian builder called Lupo, who he contacted through Roger De Vlaeminck. So he did not use Gios frames as I previously thought. Just a bit of useless trivia there :D


I've sent you a PM with the details of my powdercoater!

I knew Freddy had it frames built by another frame builder, but always thought he got them from Torino! Do you have any link to your source, cause I'm interested too :). I know the frames are not of the same top notch quality as the 'big' brands. I can see a big difference between this frame and a Colnago I'm also working on at the moment. But still, they are decent frames and definitely worth a restoration!


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2014 7:23 pm 
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Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2010 6:31 pm
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It was from reading the book 'Mannen tegen Merckx', which compiles interviews with Merckx's Belgian team mates and rivals. It is a fantastic book, loads of cool photos and stories. Put it on your Christmas list if you've not already got it :D


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2014 7:30 pm 
Old School Hero
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Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2012 5:06 pm
Posts: 232
Location: Diepenbeek
3. From donor bike to some parts

The next update will show you some parts that will be fitted on the bike. The plan to build the frame up with DA had been spinning around in my head for some weeks but only got real when I picked up a rather nice donor bike for next to nothing. I found the bike below on a local 2nd hand website and did a magnificent deal for €25. The pictures below don't say so much, but it turned out be a Olmo Competition in rather good condition with an almost complete dura ace group, 1R old logo stem and criterium bar and a Campagnolo Super Record seatpost. Yay!

Image

So the cleaning started. First: the cranks. The donor came with a used but technically in good condition DA first generation crankset. The date code is CD so it was produced in april 1978. Excellent match with the frame! Unfortunately I don't have a 'before' picture, but the crankset had some battlescars. Some scratches and the anodising came of on the usual places. Threads are in very good condition and the original dust caps are still in place . So I took some time with the buffing wheel and polished it up, with this result:

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Next: the brake levers. The donor came with a nice set of DA levers in good condition. Date code BL so from december 1977. Some scratches though, so I decided to polish them too. Before:

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During the polishing process. First, I've sanded the scratches out of the levers. Then I gave them a bath in ovencleaner to get the anodising off. Afterwards polishing!

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Cleaning the small parts and the hoods (which turn out to be in great condition):

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And the result of this work:

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Other parts on the donor bike that I can use are the brake calipers, headset and rear derailleur. Bottom bracket is also DA, but italian threaded.

So at the moment I'm still looking for a dura ace BB (english thread) and downtube shifters! If someone has some of these parts somewhere,... let me know ;)


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2014 10:43 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Fri Dec 28, 2012 5:02 pm
Posts: 1273
Location: north hamshire
nice buffing ! i reckon ive got to get some b/hoods like those for my koga from somewhere. its that shade, amber and slightly translucent and of course yours do have 'shimano' written on them.


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 10:23 am 
Gold Trader | rBoTM Winner
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well that is starting well 8)

and 25 € for a full dura ace group :facepalm: I am a bit jalous :shock:
I had to pay a 100 but for a bike with a black one :lol:

I confess I did not know powdercoating could give such a result 8)
maybe a bit thicker than wetpaint ? but if its between 60 and 80 euros that's ace :lol:

put a pic of the downtube shifters you are looking for - maybe able to help you but dont get overexcited - I don't promiss yet :wink:


Last edited by bduc61 on Tue Oct 28, 2014 12:50 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 12:48 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:10 pm
Posts: 944
Hey Flandria- don't know if you remember my thread about Dura-Ace brake lever variants? Your Gazelle CM seemed to be wearing a pair of levers like mine- the old 'bulbous' shaped body with slotted blade with non-diagonal logo. IIRC you said those levers were date-coded BL (Dec. '77)

These levers on this thread are I guess DA 7200- the new waisted-shape body with diagonal logo on the slotted blade, and you are saying that these are also date-coded BL?


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