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PostPosted: Sun Oct 13, 2013 6:52 pm 
Dirt Disciple

Joined: Sat Feb 16, 2013 4:37 pm
Posts: 58
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Yeah, I love white GIOS frames! A beautifull "Professional" in good and caring hands :wink:
It seems to come from professionel or amateur Racing- use because of the Race number Holding Pin. Do you know anything of the pedigree? Has It allready got a frame number?


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 13, 2013 7:00 pm 
Devout Dirtbag
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Joined: Fri Sep 27, 2013 11:18 am
Posts: 124
Location: Holland (if it's still there)
The holding pin for race numer was added before the repaint. The bike was from a cycloturist. Paint was bad and with the repaint job he added the pin. Decals are original from Gios Torino.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 1:04 pm 
Devout Dirtbag
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Joined: Fri Sep 27, 2013 11:18 am
Posts: 124
Location: Holland (if it's still there)
This morning spend some hours tot this project

Remove the steering and the fork and clean them all.

The finally polish I do when the bike is ready. Every time those greasy fingers :mrgreen: Not a good idea :idea:
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The magic wooden prop. For protection or just a dirt stopper? Look at the bullit rifling. It's from the Columbus steering tube that has some enforcement ribs on the inside off the tube. Looks like a gun barrel 8)
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A bike is not very comfortable without. But it was hard to find one old (at least 25 years) that looks great. But I put on my Sherlock Holmes modes.....................18 Euro? Not bad and lit looks like new.
Image

The project is speeding up. Every thing now is clean and fixed. Looking for just a few items and then: LET'S MAKE A PARTY!
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Cleaned the frame with auto shampoo

Need some outer brake cable in blue, brake set and handlebar tape. But all of these items are coming withe the postman. I hope he rings twice!

Next update this weekend (two days of hard working are waiting for me :shock: )


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 16, 2013 4:59 pm 
Devout Dirtbag
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Joined: Fri Sep 27, 2013 11:18 am
Posts: 124
Location: Holland (if it's still there)
Gastheerg wrote:
Next update this weekend (two days of hard working are waiting for me :shock: )


Shopping this afternoon was a quick job so found a few extra hours:

Al components are clean and work well. Few are on there way but build up the bike can take a start.

First mark your project :idea:
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A look at my retro-bike cave. Everybody will mention the lack off chainwheels. Waiting for an outer chainwheel!
Also waiting for some brakes
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This gone be a lovely bike. But when it's ready it goes to my friend :shock: MISTAKE!!!!!
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Low budget approach: saddle 18 Euro and pins like this you can buy for 5-10 Euro. For a showbike maybe not ok, but this bike will meet the most hardest and toughest roads in Europe. The cobbles in Belgium and Nord of France and the strade bianche in Italy (most of them in Tuscany).
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That's all folks...................

(if there is an another big update in this topic before this weekend...............believe me I lost my job :mrgreen: )


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 9:46 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2011 12:46 pm
Posts: 962
Location: Montpellier, France
You can always find another job... Keep'em coming... :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 10:39 am 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:10 pm
Posts: 669
Quote:
The magic wooden prop.


Ah, that's interesting... I've heard of this practice of hammering a close-fitting hardwood 'plug' into the bottom half of the steerer-tube, but I've never actually seen one in real life. I can just about count the bikes that have passed through my hands over forty years on the fingers of one hand, so my 'sample' is a bit small. I was never curious enough to enlarge it by sticking a little finger up random steerer-tubes on bikes parked in the street!

In my ignorance, I suspect this practice to be more common in mainland Europe than in the UK. OTOH, it's equally possible that I am the only foolhardy two-wheeler who hasn't got this hardwood plug up their steerer-tube.... I've never seen one on Retrobike before, either.. not that I've scoured every thread, looking for one, but you'd expect to find one mentioned somewhere?

My theory, based mainly on ignorance, is that this plug is security in the advent of a failure of the steerer-tube/fork-crown junction. I'd guess that brazing a steerer-tube into a big fork-crown casting might need a bit more heat than brazing frame-tubes into lugs, which might make the steerer a bit brittle.... plus you have the unavoidable 'step' between the crown-race seat and the steerer-tube- another 'weakness', and of course, unlike the frame, there is no 'triangulation' in the forks to keep things together... So, god forbid your steerer-tube gives up its integrity at any speed, but if it does, that hardwood plug hopefully keeps things functional enough to stop your bike in something like the usual gentle fashion, rather than the ultimate emergency-stop of burying the bottom of your head-tube in the tarmac.

How often do you come across these hardwood plugs, Gastheerg? Sometimes? Always? Nearly always? or Hardly ever? Same question to anyone else- mainland Europe or UK- I'm interested as to how common this practice was, or is...


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 6:54 pm 
Old School Hero
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Joined: Sat Nov 24, 2012 5:06 pm
Posts: 231
Location: Diepenbeek
torqueless wrote:
Quote:
The magic wooden prop.


Ah, that's interesting... I've heard of this practice of hammering a close-fitting hardwood 'plug' into the bottom half of the steerer-tube, but I've never actually seen one in real life. I can just about count the bikes that have passed through my hands over forty years on the fingers of one hand, so my 'sample' is a bit small. I was never curious enough to enlarge it by sticking a little finger up random steerer-tubes on bikes parked in the street!

In my ignorance, I suspect this practice to be more common in mainland Europe than in the UK. OTOH, it's equally possible that I am the only foolhardy two-wheeler who hasn't got this hardwood plug up their steerer-tube.... I've never seen one on Retrobike before, either.. not that I've scoured every thread, looking for one, but you'd expect to find one mentioned somewhere?

My theory, based mainly on ignorance, is that this plug is security in the advent of a failure of the steerer-tube/fork-crown junction. I'd guess that brazing a steerer-tube into a big fork-crown casting might need a bit more heat than brazing frame-tubes into lugs, which might make the steerer a bit brittle.... plus you have the unavoidable 'step' between the crown-race seat and the steerer-tube- another 'weakness', and of course, unlike the frame, there is no 'triangulation' in the forks to keep things together... So, god forbid your steerer-tube gives up its integrity at any speed, but if it does, that hardwood plug hopefully keeps things functional enough to stop your bike in something like the usual gentle fashion, rather than the ultimate emergency-stop of burying the bottom of your head-tube in the tarmac.

How often do you come across these hardwood plugs, Gastheerg? Sometimes? Always? Nearly always? or Hardly ever? Same question to anyone else- mainland Europe or UK- I'm interested as to how common this practice was, or is...


I found one in an Olmo competition (sold by a Belgian shop) that I'm cleaning up at the moment. Strange, cause I've never seen it before and then a couple of days later I see these posts coming up :p


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 7:16 pm 
Devout Dirtbag
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Joined: Fri Sep 27, 2013 11:18 am
Posts: 124
Location: Holland (if it's still there)
torqueless wrote:
How often do you come across these hardwood plugs, Gastheerg? Sometimes? Always? Nearly always? or Hardly ever? Same question to anyone else- mainland Europe or UK- I'm interested as to how common this practice was, or is...


I've seen it before but not very often. It's a nice detail when rebuild a bike like this but I don't give a lot off value to the real purpose.

But remember you never will look at a fork as you did before :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 4:46 pm 
Retro Guru
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Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:10 pm
Posts: 669
I once had a book that implied that fitting that hardwood plug- (and the book stated unequivocally that it should be a HARD hardwood, and a tight fit in the steerer)- was a universal practice. The book was in English, but everything about it suggested that it had been translated from French.. all the pictures were of French bikes.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 6:15 pm 
Devout Dirtbag
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Joined: Fri Sep 27, 2013 11:18 am
Posts: 124
Location: Holland (if it's still there)
WEEKEND!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Yes! Speed up this project. Cleaned some white hoods tot compare them with some brown Galli (size the same as Campa). The owner of the bike prefer the brown ones. Fine choice and a little more classic.
Image

This weekend I can make some progress :mrgreen:


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