Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Tue Dec 06, 2016 11:17 pm

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 30 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2012 5:26 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 11:55 am
Posts: 946
Location: Swansea/Birmingham
Been meaning to post this up for ages but seeing as its persisting down and there's nothing better to do I thought what better than an sunday afternoon in front of the laptop fuelled by tea & biscuits! 8)

I noticed while on ride in October last year that the headset felt a bit lose but after tightening everything during the ride when I got back it still felt slack so I decided to take everything apart and take a closer look and to my horror I found the dreaded Pace head tube crack....ARGH!!!

Image

How I didn't spot this crack while I was on the ride I'll never know but when I look back and think what I got up to during that ride I'm lucky that it didn't completely fail, especially when during part of the ride was down a very steep B road where I must have been hitting 30mph+ ......scary!

After a lot of searching on this and other forums I found that other people had encountered this fault but managed to get it repaired and so I set about contacting Pace to see what my options where. Pace put me in touch with Spondon Engineering but after I had sent them photos they claimed they couldn't do anything with it and it was either wall art or scrap metal. This, I thought, was unacceptable, I couldn't bear to part with my owned since brand new beloved Pace, it was, and is still, one of two of my dream bikes so I contacted a few other companies but with no joy. Then I remembered one of my customers is a motorcycle engineer and after a lot of dead ends and being told it was scrap I heard the words I had been wishing for: 'Yeah, bring it to me, I'll sort it.'

I dropped the frame off just before Christmas and understandably didn't expect it back before the new year but to my surprise in the week between Xmas & new year I received a few photos of the before and afters of the welding work with the message: 'Its ready, come and get it'.

The repair procedure involved cutting a V-groove into the headtube on top of the crack, which was then welded and grinded flat and then a strengthening piece added to the top and bottom faces of the headtube.

Image Image

Image Image

And this is how it looked when I picked it up, ready to be ground, sanded and polished into shape.

Image

So I started off with a grinding wheel on an angle grinder to shape the weld and strengthening straps ready for sanding.

Image Image Image

Once I had got the shape I was after I started sanding using 800, 1500, 2000 and then 4000 grit pads to get a nice smooth finish ready for polishing.

Image

And then the finish after polishing for which I used various different metal polishes and then sealed with a metal sealant to help protect the bare metal from oxidising.

Image Image

And here she is re-built with a few updates including new Flite, ProClass2 forks, a set of Hope Hoops and Hope headset ready to give me another good few years of happy Pace riding..................hopefully! ;)

Image
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2012 5:55 pm 
Gold Trader / rb Rider / Special
Gold Trader / rb Rider / Special
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2009 12:26 am
Posts: 16165
Location: Rurally close.
My reaction:

Ouch thats nasty!

Ooooo thats messy!

Hmm not bad!


Wow thats splendid, good work.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2012 5:59 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 11:55 am
Posts: 946
Location: Swansea/Birmingham
cyfa2809 wrote:
My reaction:

Ouch thats nasty!

Ooooo thats messy!

Hmm not bad!


Wow thats splendid, good work.


Cheers ;)

Ha, yeah, if I'm perfectly honest when I went to pick the frame up I wasn't expecting it to look so rough, I did know that I was going to be doing the tarting up work but my heart did sink a little at first, well chuffed with the result though :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2012 3:34 pm 
Temporary Ban
Temporary Ban

Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2010 10:25 pm
Posts: 339
Location: lIVERPPOL
Looks better than the original.
Just to be curious , would it not have to be heat treated to make it strong?
Reason i ask is i want a frame repairing.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2012 3:59 pm 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 11:55 am
Posts: 946
Location: Swansea/Birmingham
ramstein-dh wrote:
Looks better than the original.
Just to be curious , would it not have to be heat treated to make it strong?
Reason i ask is i want a frame repairing.


Cheers :)

I did ask that exact same question before the repair was done and was told that the head tube area would be heated before and after the work to help the bonding and strengthening process. I'm not sure if it does need doing though, there are many arguments for & against depending on the thickness of the material used but I trust the guy that did it as he is a very good engineer, he machines and builds motorbike engines from scratch amongst other things 8)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 10:35 am 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 11:55 am
Posts: 946
Location: Swansea/Birmingham
Quick little update on this, just increased the front disc from 160 to 180 and I think all the tweeks on the 200 are finished now 8)

Image
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 10:47 am 
South West Deputy AEC
South West Deputy AEC
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 4:53 pm
Posts: 1182
Location: Devon
Looking good :D dinky looking frame isn't it?

Pretty sure Proclass forks have a maximum disc size of 160. The force of bigger ones can cause the drop-outs to unbond.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 10:53 am 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 11:55 am
Posts: 946
Location: Swansea/Birmingham
ajantom wrote:
Looking good :D dinky looking frame isn't it?

Pretty sure Proclass forks have a maximum disc size of 160. The force of bigger ones can cause the drop-outs to unbond.


cheers, my first ever MTB was a 16" Marin Palisades when I was a nipper and although I have grown a bit since then any bike that I ride thats bigger than a 16" doesn't feel right. the red RC200 that I owned was an 18" and although it fitted me it felt way too big underneath me

oh shit, don't want that too happen, thanks for the heads up, will check it out


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 11:04 am 
Retro Guru
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 11:55 am
Posts: 946
Location: Swansea/Birmingham
ajantom wrote:
Pretty sure Proclass forks have a maximum disc size of 160. The force of bigger ones can cause the drop-outs to unbond.


yep, you're right, maximum recommended disc size is 165mm, balls! back to 160 then :roll:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 11:08 am 
Gold Trader / rb Rider / Special
Gold Trader / rb Rider / Special
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2009 12:26 am
Posts: 16165
Location: Rurally close.
Those brakes are powerful enough anyway!?


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 30 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: P20 and 17 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group