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PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2015 12:43 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 8:32 pm
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Location: Southport, UK Member No:411
Tyres were a difficult choice, not because I wanted to go tubeless, but because I wanted an XC all rounder - fast rolling, but grippy when it's wet. I've been using Continental Explorer Pro's for a few years now and although they're a 2.1, they're pretty skinny, and limited to fairer weather. If it's winter, then I switch to 2.3 Vertical, and the difference is instantly noticed for braking and grip, albeit with a slight penalty on outright speed. I've used Panaracer Fire XC pro's in the past, and found them really compliant, plus they're doing a Japanese made tubeless version currently. They come in at just over 600g each, which is 50g more than the Explorers, but the Explorers are getting thin on the ground these days, while these are readily available. So, Panaracers it is!
Setting up using the Stans sealant is really easy, and takes minutes to do.

Anyway, here's a quick photo of the tyres mounted on Stans hubs with Stans Alpine rims. The wheels are crazy light, but within my rider weight limits - the Podium MMX won't take anyone over 12 stone, but we're my first choice until I read the max rider weight. The wheels come in at 1269g a pair from memory. The forks are DT Swiss XRC 100's, which are incredible. They weigh 1156g, without the steerer cut down a few cm's.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 06, 2015 7:50 pm 
Retro Guru

Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 4:26 pm
Posts: 816
Location: Chorlton, where you knit your own yoghurt.
This is a heck of a build. It never occurred to me that wheels could be built to such fine tolerances for rider weight in order to get the weight of the wheel down.
My Alpine Trail has Fire FRs on it currently and I will be changing them at some point for Fire XCs because of that difference in weight - it's massive.
what brakes will you be using?

Reckon it'll be finished before the really foul weather sets in? If not do you envisage any changes to take into account heavy mud etc?


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2015 1:32 pm 
South East Deputy AEC
South East Deputy AEC
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Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 7:27 pm
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Location: Angmering
I've found my Fire XC Pro's to be pretty good even in reasonable amounts of mud. Air pressure accounts for a huge difference in handling I've found though


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2015 8:31 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 8:32 pm
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Location: Southport, UK Member No:411
These tyres will be the winter ones, as I've used them before, and they were great. Tyre pressure is king!

The rear end came with the very difficult to find disc adapter. I like them, but the fact that they're virtually irreplaceable now, makes me nervous. So, I decided to copy it.
The original...

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The piece of 5mm grade 6082 T6 engineering aluminium...

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The finished item next to the original...

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The photos make it look easy, but the amount of worn Dremel cutting discs tells another story...

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Quick test fit, and it's fine...

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As for brakes, I've opted for the new XT ones. If I like them, they'll stay. However, long term may see some Hope ones.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2015 8:43 pm 
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That is true dedication!


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2015 10:53 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 8:32 pm
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Location: Southport, UK Member No:411
Brand new out of the box - 10 speed XTR cassette...

Image

Next up, I fitted the lightweight rotors using titanium bolts. The rotors are only 1.7mm thin, so weigh in at 74g for a 160mm.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2015 12:38 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2012 4:26 pm
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Location: Chorlton, where you knit your own yoghurt.
That's some fine work there :-) With a DREMEL! :shock: :shock: I get a mate who's an engineer at the Airport to help with that kind of thing. ( he lets me use his gear ) Nice Rotors too.
I am just starting to use Hydraulic Disks myself and starting to realise what I have been missing, especially at what they cost these days.
How many chainrings are you going to be fitting?


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2015 1:00 pm 
South East Deputy AEC
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Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 7:27 pm
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Location: Angmering
that disc is quite pretty!


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2015 8:39 pm 
Devout Dirtbag

Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 12:41 am
Posts: 144
What a great thread. Only now picking up on it after a day in the saddle of my MV. If you don't mind I have a question about the forks. I'm running pace rc36 but feel they don't complement the rear. Can 100mm or 120mm modern forks be fitted without spoiling the goemetry. Thanks Lee


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 13, 2015 10:51 pm 
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
retrobike rider / Gold Trader
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Joined: Thu Aug 24, 2006 8:32 pm
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Location: Southport, UK Member No:411
Sorry, no pics in this post, but I'll remedy that for the next time. There's been plenty of progress this weekend, and I'll give a full update in a couple of days.

In answer to some questions...

1) I'll be running 2 x 10 on the gears.

2) Regarding front shocks and geometry - I hear you about the RC 36's being poorly matched for the rear. 100mm forks will work with the frame providing you get the hands-on-bars position low enough. Low rise stem, and flat bars do the trick. When I first rode the bike, I really struggled with finding a pair of period forks that balanced with the rear end, especially when I was using a modern DT Swiss air shock. I eventually had to go to a 2003 Rock Shox SID World Cup fork to get the same plush action as the rear. This was great until I realised that 80mm wasn't quite enough for my riding. 100mm is the maximum I'd recommend for this frame though. If you want more travel than that, then a B-17 or Wildcat Trail from the same era will give you the option of allowing a 120mm fork comfortably. If you find the rear of one of these has too much travel, then a 200/50 stroke shock will limit it slightly (they normally use a 200/57).


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