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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 5:16 pm 
Old School Hero
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Location: Bristol
I recently stripped this aluminium frame back to the metal for a new build.

very happy with the results 8) and want to keep it looking this way.

Image

I got advised by a car body shop this week, and a couple of friends, to protect the finish with a couple of coats of clear lacquer.

Then, other people have advised me against this, and said to leave it as it is.

As this is my first build and I don't know much about what to do, I'm posting on here in hope that someone "in the know" can tell me what I should do.

hoping someone can help, thanks!


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 5:37 pm 
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I'd lacquer it. Leaving it raw as it is now will invite the inevitable oxidation which can weaken the frame.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 5:48 pm 
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thanks SF, that's the way I was leaning to be honest, especially with the english winter coming up and all...


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 6:09 pm 
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I would lacquer it. It will oxidise whether you lacquer it or not (at least, that's my experience with steel frames), but the lacquer will slow the process.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 6:15 pm 
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You don't own an MGB do you? :lol: Any metal frame (car or bike) that's painted properly and completely will not oxidize. By definition, metal needs oxygen to oxidize and paint provides a barrier to oxygen bonding with the metal.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 6:26 pm 
BANNED USER
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lacquer it now, and lets ride! 8) 8) 8)


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 7:49 pm 
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I'm 100 percent absolutely positively against lacquer. After a while you WILL get moisture under there and it will look an absolute mess. Granted left bare it will oxidise but you can easily rectify that and also help prevent it. I would polish it then apply rim wax from a car shop. The wax will protect from oxidation and everyone now and again you'll need to repolish it. It works for my car wheels so i don't see why it is any different for a frame. Dave


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 10:03 pm 
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If it is a full aluminim frame, oxidizing is nbot really a problem. It will happen almost within seconds, and as aluminium oxide forms a closed layer, it will stop the process (unlike steel).
We all have plenty of bare aluminium parts on our bike, like stems, handlebars, seatposts, cranks, hubs and rims. Just a bit of polish now and then to keep them shiny (only needed for the visual aspect) is what it takes. Just be carefull with very salty enviroments.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 10:20 pm 
Old School Hero
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it is a full aluminium frame.

now im confused... different opinions from people again :oops:

edit : I'm not in a salty environment


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 1:47 am 
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From Wikipedia:

Aluminium oxide is responsible for resistance of metallic aluminium to weathering. Metallic aluminium is very reactive with atmospheric oxygen, and a thin passivation layer of alumina (4 nm thickness) forms in about 100 picoseconds on any exposed aluminium surface.[5] This layer protects the metal from further oxidation. The thickness and properties of this oxide layer can be enhanced using a process called anodising.


I think the point is, if you like a shiny look to your aluminum frame and don't want to burden yourself with a regular routine of polishing and waxing, lacquer it.


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