Retrobike Forum Index

It is currently Tue Dec 06, 2016 9:44 am

* Login   * Register * Search  * FAQ



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 7:06 am 
Old School Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2008 12:21 pm
Posts: 5785
Location: Lost in Translation
cchris2lou wrote:
Cyclotourist are numerous in france , but they just dont ride randoneurs bikes .

in my town of 26000 people on any sunday morning , you can get up to 100 riders , plus the audax ( slower group , older ) and a few on mountain bikes .

most of them ride modern carbon fibre bikes .

Yeah, that's a given. There are plenty of cyclists in France. They're just not continuing what (rightly or wrongly) is perceived to be French touring heritage. There's nothing unusual about a guy of 75 in lycra on a carbon Kuota with 10-speed Dura Ace on a Sunday club run, or 1000 young men on modern mountain bikes on an organised Raid VTT in some departmental forest, or 1000 cyclosportifs on a pseudo-race in the Alps, or a team time trial at the village kermesse. What you don't see is a French family on bikes on a camping holiday, or new bikes built with luggage-carrying in mind, or with integrated lighting, or any discussion of bikes outside quite a narrow mainstream in the mass-market cycling press.

I'm not saying that things should be any different, only that there's a gap between the perception of France's cycling heritage by the non-French (which is probably an invention of the internet age, and focuses on the things that, while very idiomatically French - the 650B campeur Alex Singer for example - may never have had quite the mass popularity one might assume) and cycling as practised in France, by the French - Decathlon, carbon, century rides and sag wagons.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 02, 2009 11:12 pm 
Dirt Disciple
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 10:52 am
Posts: 78
Location: USA
Quote:
...I'm not saying that things should be any different, only that there's a gap between the perception of France's cycling heritage by the non-French (which is probably an invention of the internet age, and focuses on the things that, while very idiomatically French - the 650B campeur Alex Singer for example - may never have had quite the mass popularity one might assume) and cycling as practised in France, by the French - Decathlon, carbon, century rides and sag wagons.


For example, here is a contribution that is widely attributed to the French concerning cycling and I can look up a source if need be but that which says that putting shellac on the handlebars is a French innovation http://briansbicyclebanter.blogspot.com ... -tape.html say like discussed on this webpage.

I think it is a good thing overall about the Rivendell thing, biking like Rivendell, that seems to be how some of this has originated. Enter Grant Peterson (ref: http://www.adventurecorps.com/way/petersenprofile.html & the company http://www.rivbike.com/) who is their head of operations. He use to work for Bridgestone and designed some of their more sought after models. Anyway, Bridgestone and Peterson eventually set on different ways and Rivendell became a bit of the company that was Peterson's sector at Bridgestone. (Peterson made their XO model or whatever it is called which also calls to mind to bring out the Nitto handlebars, etc. etc.)(Rivendell may be a good company in making bicycles but I think if one puts their noggin to good use, you may be able to come up with comparitively fine bikes using vintage frames).

You know, I think they keep some traditions alive and that is good. I can not make too informed of statements on those said traditions but it is certainly interesting.

I just pulled the above Shellac link off of google, a real good one I use to read from a few years ago, I can't quite find readily. It seems generally perusing the google results seems to say Shellac seems to have some history their in France. I have indeed shellacked my handlebars. If it is so good at "preserving" or whatever purpose it has, the handlebar tape, I'd think such practises could be useful in the UK but I see little reference for it.

I think Velo Orange is doing a bit of the same thing like Rivendell has been doing for years. I'm glad the bike industry seems to be on an imaginative note right now. It seems a few years ago, it was mainly about getting a fast bike, a Trek or a Cannondale, etc.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2009 10:00 pm 
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
Gold Trader / PoTM Winner / RB Rider
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 7:45 pm
Posts: 10942
Location: kent
yes bike industry is having a new breath .

a bit like in 90s with arival of Mountain bikes , and now with 29er and fixies .


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 20 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

About Us

Follow Retrobike

Other cool stuff

All content © 2005-2015 Retrobike unless otherwise stated.
Cookies Policy.
bikedeals - the best bike deals in one place
FatCOGS - Fat Chance Owner's Group

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group