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PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2009 7:39 pm 
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Location: Nederland
I am planning to build a tourbike, to go for longer rides with my son.
Now I have a frame, but as some of you might have read, I am still doubtfull to use that because of it's geometry.
Anyway, I have most things already sorted out, groupset and other details, now I am in the market for a frame.
Can you suggest a quality roadbike/tourbike (reynolds 531 etc) from the first half of the 80's (or late 70's) that has preferably double eyelets on fork and rearstays. I could fix up a frame and braze new eyelets on, but if it is not needed....
I was thinking about a nice Raleigh, but I have no clue on the types.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 9:13 am 
Old School Grand Master

Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 1:55 pm
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Location: New Forest, UK
Raleigh Randonneur springs to mind, also Dawes Galaxy or Claud Butler Dalesman / Regent.

The Randonneur was in 708 tubing, which is a bit more exotic than 531.

There are also plenty from small UK framebuilders, such as Mercian, M Steel and loads more.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 10:20 am 
King of the Skip Monkeys
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Orbit made a good tourer. I had a mint 1988 Schwinn tourer with proper shimano 105 touring groupset which I stupidly, STUPIDLY gave away....

Unfortunately, famous names can give terrible rides. I have, so far, found road geometry on a frame better as these can give a decent ride as well as carry all your 'stuff'.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 11:18 am 
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hamster wrote:
The Randonneur was in 708 tubing, which is a bit more exotic than 531.

Only from the mid nineties on. Prior to that they were 531ST. The Royal was (in some years at least) an identical frame with cheaper components.

I'll add Condor (Cadet), FW Evans, Argos, Chas Roberts, Dave Yates...

One thing to watch is that older British touring frames are often built for 27" wheels. Those intended for caliper brakes will often have enough reach for a 700c, but the difference in pivot placement can cause problems for some designs of canti. By the late eighties everyone was on 700c in any case, but this can be a problem for mid-eighties bikes and older.

The CTC forum is a likely place to pick up nice old touring bikes:

http://forum.ctc.org.uk/


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 12:57 pm 
King of the Skip Monkeys
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some nice wheat amongst the chaff:

http://sports.shop.ebay.co.uk/Bikes-/33 ... 1e58102070


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:32 pm 
Dirt Disciple
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You asked for it!

Since I responded to Senri's question the other day, I was hoping others would answer this one first because I researched this matter just a bit the other day myself because in fact, I have a Touring frame, with original Suntour "Mighty Shifters", it never quite worked well for me despite full servicing.

Now, I'm going to toss out a lot of links: Discussion on this topic.

http://www.bikeforums.net/archive/index ... 04119.html

http://www.bikeforums.net/archive/index ... 87164.html

I was unable to find the exact 1 I'd read in the past but these are similar.

Common Wheel Glasgow, definition of a Touring Bicycle:

http://www.commonwheel.org.uk/touring-bike

"The classic touring bike looks much like a sports bike, but has a longer wheelbase, more clearance for slightly bigger tyres and lower gearing. Some have cantilever brakes. Most have drop handlebars.

A trekking bike is the German version, which has flat or butterfly handbars and V-brakes. These are a bit overspecified but will perform adequately." (I think you'd like the whole article)

Most Americans will acknowledge the superiority of Raleighs made in England. What is interesting about the chat at Bike Forums is how some Raleigh USA Touring bikes are recommended.

Here is an illustrative catalog shot of some of the bikes they speak of, the Raleigh Kodiak for example: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/retroraleig ... ges/2.html

I gave a Raleigh Marathon to a good home which I could still check up on, I had a Raleigh Wyoming that was too big. Still, when I had them, I was not aware they seem to actually be perceived as pretty good bicycles. I had to whip that Marathon into shape a few times to make work and other deadlines so I guess it was working.

I've got my own questions on Touring, there is a lot on Touring on the internet. Like this: http://www.fullyloadedtouring.com/ and one of those list serv groups too.

From reading about those Raleighs, it makes me think, for a lot of them, there being made of steel makes them good candidates for touring.

I even read a Motobecane Nomade can be a good touring bike. It is a bit of an entry-level bike Motobecane, the Nomade is, not too heavy but probably more than one wanting a 531 Reynolds steel bike. Coming from the Rocky Mountain West, I've pondered this whole matter though now where I am it is pretty flat.

That Nomade seems like a very responsible dependable bike, it's Huret derailleurs make it the best shifting bike I've ever had. Motobecane themselves even called one of their Mirages good for "light touring."

The Nomades had a Solida Crank which I believe I came to find is an entry-level Stronglight crank. It's lowest gear is actually pretty good for Mountains and hills. I've toyed with the idea and feasability of putting a low chainring on or a triple chainring crank on but to me, it doesn't work to start changing the bike set up too much.

Back to the Raleigh Super Tourer for a moment, 531 Tubing, Tang fork, chrome on the back and the front, http://media.photobucket.com/image/rale ... leigh2.jpg this is the exact bicycle down to the colour that I have except the guy obviously put in some bar end shifters and no white handlebar wrap on my bike. This bike is at least a 1981 Raleigh because it has the decal on it that commemorates Raleigh winning the 1980 Tour De France with Joop Zoetemelk.

Nay, no one may have read this far, but, the bike is in storage but I've tracked down the serial number before and it seems to have the Worksop serial number that it was made in 1976. No big deal except the same colour again and the same looking bike but with "Riser Bars" are the 1976 Raleigh Super Tourer from this catalog shot: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/retroraleig ... ourer.html . So, I've got to believe it is the same bike. I have some extra derailleurs and all, the derailleur I got it with was Simplex, again, so-so. Maybe this bike might work out. It's transmission never really worked well for me and as of now, it is a single speed and a very light bike, easy to lift over my head. Possibly the Super Tourer is one of those Carlton Raleighs additionally, however, those Raleigh USAs actually seemed highly recommended too.

Also, unless you are touring "fully loaded", like the Common Wheel article seems to say, a lot of bicycles may suffice within reason.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 9:53 pm 
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Thanks for all the suggestions, guys. I have already seen a very nice Roberts frame for sale as well as a Condor. Good tip also about the 27" wheels. As I still have to buy rims for it, it is not such a problem, but of course the tire choice is limited and the use of standard caliper brakes is doubtfull as well.

I am still doubting to use a roadbike frame and braze some extra eyelets on. It won't be as sturdy as a bike especially for touring (reynolds 531ST etc), but it was not intended for carryingheavy loads anyway.
With all the suggestions I have enough to search for!

By the way, talking about french bikes, I think Peugeot also made a lot of tourer type bikes. Normally I stay clear of french bikes, because of there strange BB, or as with the later Motobecane, strange Swiss thread. Maybe I should reconsider?

FtM, your Raleigh Super Tourer sounds like a fine example. Maybe you could post some pics sometime?


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2009 2:33 pm 
Dirt Disciple
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Yes, I will seek to get photos of all my rides, it may take a few weeks. I have missed some of the technological revolution. I do have access to one of those computer cameras, I'm just not very knowledgeable about it.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2009 3:04 pm 
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Senri wrote:
By the way, talking about french bikes, I think Peugeot also made a lot of tourer type bikes. Normally I stay clear of french bikes, because of there strange BB, or as with the later Motobecane, strange Swiss thread. Maybe I should reconsider?

Touring with a load seems to have been a minority interest in France compared with its relative popularity in the UK. Although it's always been there in the background, the cyclosportif and brevet events have always been far more popular, and the result is that good bikes for real touring are quite thin on the ground. Add the obsolete threads (not only the bottom bracket, but also the headset, hubs, pedals, and freewheel) and metric steerer to the equation, and there are plenty of reasons not to look for a classic touring bike in France...

Of course there are gems like Singer and Herse that deserve special attention, but those are real collectors' bikes and command the very highest prices.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2009 5:00 pm 
South East AEC
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FW Evans are a personal fave, Dawes Galaxy are good, try looking for a Audax bike


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